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Been doing a few smaller projects but we just started getting into the bigger ones. Our D8N was getting exhaust in the coolant. I was hopeful it was something cheap and simple like a head gasket. Of course it's never that simple lol.

Popped the head off and the fire rings look good so we sent the head out to be pressure checked and magnafluxed. Should know in a day or two how it is. The liners are glazed and the crank journals have some scratches and will need to be polished or ground so we're pulling the engine and torque out. Of course I forgot that I needed a bigger chainfall so tomorrow we just have to pull the motor mounts and out she comes.
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Also replacing some front axle kingpin cups and balls on a 4760. They only have 700 hrs on them. Must have been a few cups not properly hardened as they have probably 3/8" wear on them and have been greased at least every 10 hrs.

The ones they replaced had over 10k hrs and only had maybe 1/16" wear on them. Pretty disappointed.

Going to replace the hub bearings and seals, axle output bushings and seals and planetary needle rollers while we're in there. If they make another 17k hrs I'll be happy.
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I like seeing what everyone else is up to so let's see your projects.
 

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I wish we had a heated shop to work in in the winter. Once the snow melts it is a mad dash to get everything done through out the season until the snow flys late in the fall. I would love to go through our combines over the winter.
 

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My shop looks like that all winter with customer units. Always have a project on the of our own thow. Have to piant my 5020 this month hopefully
 

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Having a heated shop is probably one of the best investments a guy could ever make. Even if you aren't capable of major repairs, taking care of all the little grimlins that would otherwise not get done or never really get done right is well worth it. We don't have a lot actually going on in our shop this winter except for the general maintainance of all our equipment, of course unless we find something lurking in the shadows while doing a service. Only real project is a 94 Mack we bought to swap a box to from our old tandem that is finished. Not much to do to the truck, 2-3 things to get it to pass a safety. Have a welder in town that will swap the box from one truck to the other so nothing there for us to do, then put it back in the shop to rewire the box and plumb the hydraulics. Might have a little project if we decide to add a remote hoist, but that can be done at any time. Also going to run our old camper through and do a few repairs and clean out before we sell it. Kind of nice to not have a list a mile long like some years, maybe finally getting ahead of the game??:ROFLMAO:
 

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This intrigues me, we have a heated shop and I don't mind doing oil changes and fixing little things, this winter we want to do the meter housings on our 1910 air cart, stuff like that, but to yank an engine or axles or transmission apart seems like way too daunting a task for me to tackle myself.

Do you guys who do these major repairs just wing it? Or do you have training? My fear is always I could probably tear it apart no problem. But I'd have a bench full of leftover parts when I'm done. Haha.
 

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Besides our own stuff in the shop we usually have a couple of customers projects on the go. Currently have the planetary from a Apache sprayer and clean grain auger from a S690 combine.

A number of years ago I bought a new Lathe and kept track of the money I made with it I did enough work for others that I had it paid for in 3 years.
 

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Need to put a new transmission in a 4440 (PS)

Go through the combine.....again

Do a major overhaul on the baler

Put a new rear end on one of the semis

Numerous other projects too numerous to say. I don't have enough time.
 

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A number of years ago I bought a new Lathe and kept track of the money I made with it I did enough work for others that I had it paid for in 3 years.
Do you think you could pay for it by just doing your own work?
It seems every once in a while I wish I had one, mostly for small parts. But when I try to justify the cost I can’t seem to. I look at them at least once a winter but can’t seem to pull the trigger. We are only 30 min from local metal shops, I could definitely see the need more for more remote farms.
 

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Do you guys who do these major repairs just wing it? Or do you have training? My fear is always I could probably tear it apart no problem. But I'd have a bench full of leftover parts when I'm done. Haha.
I start with a workshop manual, read it through from start to finish of the proposed job and then decide if I have the capabilities, tools, etc.
You pay for a workshop manual whether you do the job or someone else does.
You have to be able to understand what you are reading and then do it that way.
 

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Small projects so far... still working on the electrical and plumbing the air lines in the shop. Trying to get things organized and I needed a cabinet to store my hydraulic jacks. Made it all out of scrap lumber. Turned out heavier than I expected so I might have to go to wheels with a bigger than 1/2" bore. Pipe bender hangs on hooks on the back.
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This intrigues me, we have a heated shop and I don't mind doing oil changes and fixing little things, this winter we want to do the meter housings on our 1910 air cart, stuff like that, but to yank an engine or axles or transmission apart seems like way too daunting a task for me to tackle myself.

Do you guys who do these major repairs just wing it? Or do you have training? My fear is always I could probably tear it apart no problem. But I'd have a bench full of leftover parts when I'm done. Haha.
Many years ago a very respected mechanic told me "just remember that someone put that thing together and there's no damm reason why you can't take it apart and put it back together" so I took the carb back home and tore it apart and cleaned it and I've been living by that advice for the last 70 years
 

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Or as one person told me about something broken and not working, do you think you're break it more if you take it apart and try to fix it.
Nothing is ever completely broken. That is until I fix it!!!!!
 

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That there is the main point before I tear into something. I can't break what is already broken but if something is still functioning I might make it worse by tearing into it or damage something a shop may have saved. But these days with everything getting bigger and more complex I would be more inclined to send the machine in for major repair. The physical size of things has become the biggest factor for what I will undertake. Don't have the help, tools or equipment to do the engine on a 500 hp tractor where as I would take out and rebuild the engine on a 50 hp one.
So this winters project is rewiring the Kenworth W900a. Been putting it off for a few years. The important circuits work but so much wiring has been cut into, changed, or simply not used over its 45 year life that started as a tractor and now a grain box truck that I can strip out most of it and give it a life extension. Easy enough to get a shop to fix an engine or transmission but if the wiring is a bundle of spaghetti and causing problems then hours go by getting an otherwise sound truck back on the road.
 

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Been doing a few smaller projects but we just started getting into the bigger ones. Our D8N was getting exhaust in the coolant. I was hopeful it was something cheap and simple like a head gasket. Of course it's never that simple lol.

Popped the head off and the fire rings look good so we sent the head out to be pressure checked and magnafluxed. Should know in a day or two how it is. The liners are glazed and the crank journals have some scratches and will need to be polished or ground so we're pulling the engine and torque out. Of course I forgot that I needed a bigger chainfall so tomorrow we just have to pull the motor mounts and out she comes. View attachment 157993 View attachment 157994 View attachment 157995
Also replacing some front axle kingpin cups and balls on a 4760. They only have 700 hrs on them. Must have been a few cups not properly hardened as they have probably 3/8" wear on them and have been greased at least every 10 hrs.

The ones they replaced had over 10k hrs and only had maybe 1/16" wear on them. Pretty disappointed.

Going to replace the hub bearings and seals, axle output bushings and seals and planetary needle rollers while we're in there. If they make another 17k hrs I'll be happy. View attachment 157996 View attachment 157997
I like seeing what everyone else is up to so let's see your projects.
We have a 6C in same state right now. Whom ever rebuilt the engine before we had it used all Cat parts but didn’t tighten the bolts enough on the connecting rod.
Been doing a few smaller projects but we just started getting into the bigger ones. Our D8N was getting exhaust in the coolant. I was hopeful it was something cheap and simple like a head gasket. Of course it's never that simple lol.

Popped the head off and the fire rings look good so we sent the head out to be pressure checked and magnafluxed. Should know in a day or two how it is. The liners are glazed and the crank journals have some scratches and will need to be polished or ground so we're pulling the engine and torque out. Of course I forgot that I needed a bigger chainfall so tomorrow we just have to pull the motor mounts and out she comes. View attachment 157993 View attachment 157994 View attachment 157995
Also replacing some front axle kingpin cups and balls on a 4760. They only have 700 hrs on them. Must have been a few cups not properly hardened as they have probably 3/8" wear on them and have been greased at least every 10 hrs.

The ones they replaced had over 10k hrs and only had maybe 1/16" wear on them. Pretty disappointed.

Going to replace the hub bearings and seals, axle output bushings and seals and planetary needle rollers while we're in there. If they make another 17k hrs I'll be happy. View attachment 157996 View attachment 157997
I like seeing what everyone else is up to so let's see your projects.
Have engine and torque out of our 6C right now. Found out previous owner did a rebuild with genuine Cat parts but forgot what a torque wrench was. Bolts come loose on cap holding connecting rod to crank. Broke crank and cam shaft in 3 places. Not to mention put a hole through the block. Took block to Edmonton and got hole welded. Surprised how cheap parts are to rebuild those engines. Brand new crank $1500, cam shaft $400. Parts like $6000 to do complete rebuild. Now looks like our mechanic friend has the engine done and ready to put back in. Unfortunately the shop it’s in has a blue roof.
 

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We just got our shop built this summer so lots of time has been spent organizing and moving stuff. Along with putting up shelves benches ect. Here is a waste oil pail and oil drain. And I’m currently working on our forage harvester. No big projects yet but you never know what’s going to break.
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Going to start on trackhoe undercarriage in the next day or so, travel motor blew out in to final drive, unfortunately it is not in the shop
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Do you guys who do these major repairs just wing it? Or do you have training? My fear is always I could probably tear it apart no problem. But I'd have a bench full of leftover parts when I'm done. Haha.
I have no formal training. My dad is self taught. I learned lots from him and different guys who have worked with us over the years. Have one neighbour who's a machinist and told me the same thing as gleanerman.

I have a couple filing cabinets of service manuals and that has probably been the best ROI of a anything on the farm. Deere, Versatile, and Cat have good manuals with decent picture. Some of the NH ones I have are less than user friendly or descriptive.

Part of the equation is knowing who to deal with. I deal with a great engine guy who will straight up tell you whether a head, block, crank etc is good, salvageable, worth repairing or a boat anchor.
 
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