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Do you think you could pay for it by just doing your own work?
It seems every once in a while I wish I had one, mostly for small parts. But when I try to justify the cost I can’t seem to. I look at them at least once a winter but can’t seem to pull the trigger. We are only 30 min from local metal shops, I could definitely see the need more for more remote farms.

Absolutely. Once you have it and learn how to use it you will use it all the time. Keep your eye open for a good used one fore reasonable. I even use ours for drilling holes and threading pipe. I don't think we have eve bought a universal tool, no matter the price, that hasn't been well worth it in the long run. Currently looking for a good cheap mill to set beside the lathe.

The lathe isn't where the money is. The bits and attachments are the expense.
 
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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Not the farm shop, but continuing this one at my home shop. Currently starting interior work. Building door panels from scratch.
I have a huge amount of admiration for guys who can do body work. Done a little on some salvage vehicles that I got recertified. Let's just say it was "functional". Lol. I learned being a body man wasn't my calling.
 

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Another small project while I was plumbing the shop for air lines. One of the causes for air compressor tank failure is rust. This leads me to ask the question, "If rusted out tanks are an issue, why do we store water in them?" Yes, I know all about automatic drains and that you are supposed to drain the tank regularly, but why allow the water to accumulate there at all? What I decided to do with the new (about a year ago) Ingersol Rand was to create a collection point below the tank that will gravity drain the fluid out of the tank constantly, and then drain the collection tank when I flip the lever. My collection tank was a dead hydraulic cylinder with the piston replaced by a large bolt. It sits on a slight angle so the water drains to the bottom near the discharge line. The cylinder and 1/4" lines were kicking around for free, and are rated somewhere around 3,000 lbs/sq. in. so my compressor topping out at 175 psi shouldn't be an issue. I also have a pellet style drier downstream from the compressor that I haven't put pellets in so it acts like a sediment bowl as well. There are 3 drops in the shop, each with a regulator, filter and automatic drains so moisture hasn't been an issue for me lately. The ball valve on the wall beside the compressor drains the collection tank into the old windshield washer fluid jug on the floor. The top has been vented to allow air to escape. The compressor is housed in a dog house I attached to the side of the shop last summer.
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I have a huge amount of admiration for guys who can do body work. Done a little on some salvage vehicles that I got recertified. Let's just say it was "functional". Lol. I learned being a body man wasn't my calling.
I plan on doing 99% of this project myself. The only thing I won't be doing is replacing/repairing the roof (stretched dents), and upholstering the seats. I'm currently building custom interior door and side panels. Will upholster those on my own however.
 

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Ken Adams
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Re-configuring a Morris 8336 cart. Almost ready to remove tanks, then will build back up.
New near axle with 6", 35000lb axles with 800r38 duals replacing 4.5", 20000lb axles with 30.5L32 singles.
Moving 150 bu tank ahead and installing 2800 us gal tank on rear for UAN.
Mounting 550 us gal tank on front for starter fer.
Constructing smaller tank to fit ahead of 150 for canola and innoculant.
These new axles have brake discs but might not get configured till next year.
Sure wish this was Nov 16 instead of Feb 16
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Discussion Starter · #51 ·

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Hi anvil.

Is that an air and screen over an indent?

Where did you find the belting?

Looks good.
You are correct it is a air suction and a shaker deck over a triple indent.
The belt is actually a used roll of 24" belt from a local fertilizer supplier... not sure why it was changed seems in quite Good shape still... we lined it up with a good long fence on a table saw and cut it in half.

Heres my double conveyor... nearly complete

 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
Needed to cut hole for axle tube. Bolted plate to stub axle and rotated plate, leaving plasma stationary(worked pretty slick)
Had frame outside to flip, so just set 2 of the tanks in place - certainly going to look a bit odd ball!!
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That looks way handier than my circle cutting attachment for my torch. I'm definitely borrowing that idea next time I need to cut a circle.

Keep the pictures coming ?
 

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You can buy kits from most manufacturers. Mine has a center with a magnet, needle or bolt attachment. Can cut circle on a bevel as well, or use it as a straight line guide
 

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During the cold spell in January I ruined a hydraulic pump on a smaller tractor that was left outside for several days. I should have put some heat on the transmission also, instead of only plugging in the block heater. Normally I would dilute the fluid on a tractor that’s used regularly in the winter.

These style of gear pumps likely were produced under a few names, some of them are Webster’s I think. They have bimetallic wear plates with one brass side positioned on the sides of the gears. These things crack or break in an abusive situation like that and either stop pumping or have poor performance. They also have a two part seal system that nests in the housings and seals against the wear plates.

This little pump has one large set of gears and wear plates for the remotes and the three point hitch and another set of very thin gears for the power steering and transmission pressure. After marking the pump sections for orientation, this is what the trouble looks like inside.

Notice the missing piece in the red circle on the first plate in the first photo. About 50% of that squiggly blue seal and most of its not shown rubber backer is also shredded and missing. Sometimes the seal lands are also blown out of the aluminium housings not shown as well.
In the second photo there is only a crack in the wear plate on the other side of the same gears. I have a crate of similar old pumps and a few new gasket seals so parts weren’t a problem. It only took about an hour but I’ve done it many times. A new pump is likely unavailable or unrealistically expensive. Proper orientation of all of the pieces is critical because it could probably be assembled dozens of ways. Set things down in a way that you don’t get mixed up if it doesn’t make sense.
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Seeing a failed hyd pump from cold weather reminds me.... I worked on a Bobcat years ago aluminum housing gear pump similar to above....
Make damn sure that your hydraulic oil is not Milkey looking... sure sign of water mixed in it... that WILL cause a pump to split open in below freezing weather. 😌
 

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This was a job we tackled a while ago but thought it was worth sharing. We haven't done a ton of work on construction equipment but decided to try to replace the pinion gear on our how. Figured if we got stuck we'd just call the service guys. Turned out to be a pretty easy job, just had to unhook about 5 hydraulic lines from the main motor, take out a lot of big bolts that held it in place, and then lift it out with a forklift. The angles were kinda tricky but once everything lined up it came right out. Then we just had to spin the hoe around by hand (fortunately the shop was big enough! Can't wait for our new shop to be finished!) And dig out all the pieces of the pinion gear and feel for any damage to the ring gear.

The gears in these machines are pretty huge! The pinion is maybe 9 or ten inches in diameter and about 6 inches tall. I guess they take quite a bit of force! This machine has about 12000 hours, this new gear should last quite a while, especially since we only put a couple hundred hours on it each year.

Everything went together pretty smoothly, smoother than coming out for sure.

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A last fall project of buying a SuperB AS1000 grain dryer and getting it moved home from South Dakota turned into a winter project to get it set up and working. It got pretty high to load on a truck to haul so I bought 3 8,000 lb axles to put under it and built a gooseneck hitch to get some weight on the one ton dually and pulled it home myself. I spent a few weeks going through everything to make it right. I have had a spare 100 kw genset with zero hours as my backup and installed it into a nice little skidshack with fuel tank and breaker panel and electrical to sell as a power supply for the dryer. The dryer sold but the buyer had his own generator so I spent a month and a half sourcing all the wire and boxes and contactors and motors and with a little help from a local electrician we got it all running
 

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