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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone running one of these in Edible beans? Say like navies? Anyone ever germ tested them for seed, if so what % germ can you achieve?
 

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Here's a photo of the sample I was able to get with my Lexion 750tt in regar Mungbeans using all round bar, APS grates & concave pretty good I thought ;)
 

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In what way does a Combine effect germination quality?
Splits and foreign material in the sample is always my concern as you can see a properly set up Lexion alleviates any of those issues, germ quality is more to do with storage and moisture content of the seed and how it's looked after once it has left the field. If I am missing something please enlighten me :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I raise a lot of seed beans and there are always germination clauses in the contracts usually with incentives. For example: Base minimum germ is 85% so anything under this gets sold as commercial edible beans for a reduced price of course. 90%-92% usually will see a 1 cent increase, 93%-95% will see a 2.5 cent increase, 96% + will see a 5 cent increase. So it can make you quite a bit of money to get the premiums.

Now as for how the combine affects that there are several factors. Moisture, if you are below about 8% moisture you are just going to get germ damage.....more splits and skin checks. Prefect moisture would be 14% this is where the least amount of seed damage would occur. Skin checks are determined by doing a soak test, take a sample, pick out 100 beans and dump them in water for 30 seconds (for navies) some beans take more time in the water but navies have really thin skins. After 30 seconds you take them out and pick through them to see which ones have a tear in the skin. You want to be below 5% I prefer to be between 2.5 and 3%. The combine inflicts this damage through augers, elevators rotors ect............ No one uses a conventional machine around here to do seed beans with, all of it is done with rotaries. The standard used to be the old case/ih 1460-2188's. Increasingly you see them being out done by the STS Deere's which is what I use currently.
 

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CSFI I assume with beans you will be running a slow cylinder speed to prevent damage. Slow cylinder speeds and tough crops are good recipe for burnt APS belts and plugging. I do not know anything about the beans you grow but it would be worth while to confirm from other Lexion owners that grow those type of beans whether a Lexion is any good at doing that type of crop. When we were buying a 590r we were looking at buying a machine that a guy was getting rid of because he said it was terrible for doing the type of beans he was growing. Having plugged my APS in tough canola swaths 4 times in a couple hours a few days ago I can tell you it is not fun to pull material that is wrapped tight around the APS. If it was not dark I would have went to the shop for the chain saw to cut the stuff out.
 

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Thanks for explaining the finer points of bean seed production, for that sort of high quality work I would go the STS as well, our Lexion goes pretty good with the changes I have made, HHS interchangeable concave so we can run all sorts of concave and APS combinations and the rotor flow kit and impeller wear kit, all these changes made our Lexion into a far better machine than standard and it is certainly a superior combine with what we do but I could not say it would be a better machine in your situation than an STS, good luck ;)
 
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