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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When lexion came with new roto grates in 2019 and they are no good .
Did those units all got upgraded by dealer or could there still be units around if dealer just sold them as .
Are 2020 rotors same as 2022 ?
what else is different?
 

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When lexion came with new roto grates in 2019 and they are no good .
Did those units all got upgraded by dealer or could there still be units around if dealer just sold them as .
Are 2020 rotors same as 2022 ?
what else is different?
Rotors never changed.
All impellers should be changed up, only the small run preseries ’19’s got straight paddle impellers.
Not sure how long raised finger (****ty) grates were installed, perhaps just ‘19 but I’d check if a ‘20 is being looked at.
 

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Check the rotor grates like Don mentioned to make sure they are not the wide open finger ones that let too much material onto the sieves. They went back to the original rotor grates that were used in the 500 and 700 series.
 

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I would think that running maybe a combination of the two grate styles might be a good choice. With the addition of cover plates, it might be better in a wider variety of conditions.
NO!
Those finger grates had a very special talent, they could increase shoe loss AND increase rotor loss at the same time.
Quite an accomplishment really.
 

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Those finger grates had a very special talent, they could increase shoe loss AND increase rotor loss at the same time.
Quite an accomplishment really.
Nobody wants to know why?!
To swag how that is even possible, the flooding shoe part is easy, greater grate open area.
As to rotor loss, that requires a study of the both the shape of the fingers and their positioning.
The fingers were not flat on top, they were dished with a rise at the tip causing them to throw grain back into the crop mat.
The old and now same new raised “bump“ wire grates are much more likely to send grain to the sides down to the pan
They were also staggered rows of fingers which may have increased grain reentry to crop mat.

Lacking the multitude of testing equipment I would like to think Claas has that is my swag.
If they have such equipment however that does not explain how this junk ever saw the light of production day.
Nor the straight paddle impeller.
Nor the 1 to 1 impeller drive.
Nor the primary auger drive belt.

All fixed now but still…
 

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Nobody wants to know why?!
To swag how that is even possible, the flooding shoe part is easy, greater grate open area.
As to rotor loss, that requires a study of the both the shape of the fingers and their positioning.
The fingers were not flat on top, they were dished with a rise at the tip causing them to throw grain back into the crop mat.
The old and now same new raised “bump“ wire grates are much more likely to send grain to the sides down to the pan
They were also staggered rows of fingers which may have increased grain reentry to crop mat.

Lacking the multitude of testing equipment I would like to think Claas has that is my swag.
If they have such equipment however that does not explain how this junk ever saw the light of production day.
Nor the straight paddle impeller.
Nor the 1 to 1 impeller drive.
Nor the primary auger drive belt.

All fixed now but still…
I assume all their new stuff gets tested hard in Germany? Are their crops lighter with straw that the rotor grate issue got past initial testing? I assumed Euro crops had tons of straw.
 

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I assume all their new stuff gets tested hard in Germany? Are their crops lighter with straw that the rotor grate issue got past initial testing? I assumed Euro crops had tons of straw.
Not just Germany, protos are tested in many areas.

Your last part is correct, they have tons of straw but the MOG/G ratio tends to be considerably lower giving higher t/hr grain productivity than possible in Western Canada.
 

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Ive also heard the new fan on the feeder house is not all that it’s cracked up to be (looked to be really bad with soybeans). Is this true? Why can they not figure that one out?
Remember my first ride in ‘75 in a New Holland TR70, the first combine with axial threshing, no crosswise components to stir dust forward and the total lack of feeder entry dust was pretty impressive. Granted, with a pickup header.
That design is gone from all machines now, beaters added mainly for rock trap reasons, so the clean air flow through is gone.
Result is all machines will be dustier than my ‘75 TR 70 ride.
Hybrid Claas never had direct flow though so were inherently dustier, feeder fan added to reduce dust, expanded to full width on sea greens even with HP feeder.
While it likely tightens the dust gap it’s pretty steep dust hill to climb.
Crop conditions also complicate, I’ve seen where header alone can generate enough dust you can’t tell if the combine feeder house is adding dust or not (it is).

Would not be my radar at all for machine consideration.
 

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I almost believe the prep pan adds to the dust coming out of the feeder in front. I often see dust being "paddled" out of the front, as the prep pan is shaking back and forth. It acts like a large pump, moving a lot of air on each stroke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
seen more 2020 s with the “ bad “ rotor grates in .
Claas confirmed that no updates are done and customers are on their own .
Guess no money left to solve mistakes.
maybe have to look at Deere now
 
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