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Doing my homework on a lexion combine currently. Looking at a 460 or 560. Just heard from someone that a lexion might do more damage to soybeans than an older case combine (2166 or 2388). Any experience?
 

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ReinhardVL,
that's true. A conventional walker system like the 4-560 does a lor more damage to the beans than a rotary combine. Main reason is that especially in beans with "rubber" pods or beans around 15% moisture you have to set the concave very aggressive to get a good sample. It works better when you install a special round bar concave under the main threshing cylinder, but this is a lot of work. From my experience it is up to 20% broken kernels, depending on circumstandces and variety!

TOM
 

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Yes single rotor combines are more gentle on soybeans. However if set properly the Lexion is nothing to be afraid of.
My Lexion experience is only with rotor machines. I believe almost all the soybean threshing is done before it gets to the rotors, so I don't think whether you have a walker or rotor machine much matters. A walker combine may even perform better in green stem beans, because green stems can bridge after the impeller on R models, a walker would eliminate that.
If you are looking at R models a Sunnybrook impeller is a must.
Sunnybrook cylinders are also a big advantage because you can slow the cylinder down more without as much risk of plugging.
The APS grates are easy to change. Make sure you have the large hole ones installed, round bar are better.
 

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A. A walker combine may even perform better in green stem beans, because green stems can bridge after the impeller on R models, a walker would eliminate that.

B. The APS grates are easy to change. Make sure you have the large hole ones installed, round bar are better.
A. I always thought impeller plugging was between cylinder and impeller, the pinch points jamming the impeller?
Didn’t think any plugging occurs between rotors and impeller but perhaps beans are different.

B. Was going to try large 40 mm oval hole APS grates this year in peas, have used round bar but thought more open area better?
 

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For me, impeller issues mainly originated between the impeller and nose piece of the rotors. In fact, it would bridge tough stems there and they would build up to the impeller and rub on the impeller all day long. Add in a tougher spot on the field and the material wrapped around the nose could give issues. That is why I removed rotor nose and installed a knife on it, to keep it clean. This helped so much. After a few years, I had a separate impeller issue and installed a SunnyBrook and retained the knife on the rotor nose. This was even better, as the SB is more aggressive, heavier with staggered, deep paddles. Along with all of this increased capacity, you are able to run the cylinder slower, for better seed quality.

The C9 engine is decent. It has very good power and torque. It does not start very well in cold weather. It requires good clean oil and more frequent intervals than some of the newer engines. The oil is critical in this engine because of the HEUI fuel system. The HEUI and injectors is the weak point on the engine. They can give trouble, but usually, don't run them out of fuel, and keep fresh oil in them, and they can run many hours.
 

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I ran a lexion in over dry seed beans this year. Samples were same for broken seeds compared to a sts deere. I have sunnybrook impeller and cylinder and I was able to harvest chest high soybeans at 5.4mph. Was very impressed after hearing lexion soybean horror stories. So far so good here. Could out cut a deere which is a great soybean combine here this year.
 

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A. I always thought impeller plugging was between cylinder and impeller, the pinch points jamming the impeller?
Didn’t think any plugging occurs between rotors and impeller but perhaps beans are different.

B. Was going to try large 40 mm oval hole APS grates this year in peas, have used round bar but thought more open area better?
A. Seed cleaner nailed the explanation. When the stock impeller gets wear in the centre, is can make harvesting green stem beans terrible. Never tried a knife kit, but apparently it helps a lot. A impeller wear kit is a good fix until they wear. The sunnybrook is the cure.

B. Yes I use the 40mm big oval hole. The round bar I was referring to would probably have more open space? The ones with the big round bars, I've never used them. A neighbour switched to them for edible beans and thought it was an improvement from the large oval hole. I just assume that means they would also be better in soys as well...and maybe peas.
 
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