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What are the lifespans on the 2188-2388 combines. The neighbour says the dealer told him 3000 sep hours. I am wondering because we are looking at a 1997 2188 with 2500 sep hours on it. It needs some new augers and belts but other than that it looks solid.
 

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what really is a life span on a machine where all the components are replaceable? As long as you're willing to pay and install, it can run forever. I know of a colony that had 4 1640's for 19 seasons and they looked really good when they traded them in. They had a metal shop and were able to build all new tin for them as it wore out
 

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9520, I understand what you are asking. Kirschenman sounded a little bit evasive, but I understand his point, too.

From what I hear, "3000 hours" applies more to the Deere rotors than the CIH. [From what] I understand (about the CIH), you can add about 1000 hours to that (about 4000 hrs) before you start pouring the dollars to it.
Sure, everything ~can~ be rebuilt. To me, though, there comes a time....or...a point is reached where it might be better/more ecnomical in the long run to look for an upgrade or replacement.

That is why I am sticking with the Deere walker machine(s). For the crops I harvest, and the length that I like to keep a machine, they (the walkers) are the best option.
 

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I hear 1500 on a sts and their shot a 2388 will last forever esp if you put extended wear parts in them the augers and tin work are the weak point
 

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Quote:O you mean the combine with the glass a**?

Don

"Glass ass"? Give me a break! Even if an STS was DONE at 1500 hrs. (which they are not), do you realize how much material has gone through one of those machines in that amount of time?
I really get things put into perspective pertaining to my [relatively small] combine when I am plowing, and the plow gets bawled-up with straw--the straw won't shed through... It is nothing short of amazing how much straw is on the ground! When a plow bawls-up, say in 20 yds.; and makes a pile 40 feet wide (width of plow) and 3 feet tall, and 4 feet deep...that is a lot of straw!! And that was just 20 yds. worth!
Yeah, the CIH machine may be (or may NOT be (?)) longer lived....
I can not say, myself, with any certainty, as I do not own a STS....
Do you own a STS, Don? or do you have a CIH Rotor? If so, how many hours do you have on yours?
 

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I don't understand how poor straw management proves that a 9600 is a durable machine.

There may be a point where it makes more sense to trade a machine than fix it, but you can always get parts for an axial flow case.

From what I have seen the augers in a case will be shot at 2500, as you said. Belts will depend on how it has been run and where it was stored. The tin on the bubble up in the grain tank may be shot, at least the lower tube of the bubble up and the top piece where the grain is flung by the elevator.

Feeder chain and sprockets, rotor ears, rub bars, maybe a cone (look out for that, they arent fun to replace), cage vanes maybe. And most likely it will have new sieves and rails already, its just a question of how many times!!!

On a case, there is nothing major that will be damaged that can't be replaced. no problems with gearboxes or anything, so there shouldn't be any trouble in that area.

Not very many combines enjoy rocks...
 

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Quote:It's amazing how everybody puts down JOHN DEERE, it's OK. Have not seen it in the JD threads that they go blast any other maker. WE KNOW BETTER. The more you blast JD the more they are number 1.

That must be the same reasoning used to get the goverment that you have.

Don
 

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The thing is, it's such a loaded question. (Thats not ment as a jab at the author) It is so important to understand the variables here, but no-one seems to want to. In my area of the pnw, the crops are non-abrasive, and the weather in season is hot and dry. We run turf tires and smoothies. No 4wds around here, but you can tell when a farmer buys an out of state machine, it has R1s and 4wd. The local grain growers dont run tank extentions, but the grass seed guys are starting to since grass only weighs 1/3rd of what wheat does. So locally a 5,000 hour machine, if shedded and taken care of is like brand new. Thats not to say that anyone much runs a machine to that age. But there are a few of us that are giving it a try.

Some folks use the line about there coming a time when it dont pencil to keep a machine, so you need to upgrade. While that may be true in some areas, locally it is better said that, a new machine cant be pencilled, but if its what the farmer "wants"it, he'll find a way to get it. Or if its perceived that a new machine will eliminate a labor cost, the farmer will have the new machine no matter how wrong the perception was.


I have 3100 hours on a 1680 with the original tin under the tank augers and both original cross augers in the tailings and clean grain. Still has the original beater and tin work under the beater. However the bouncing around in the grass fields does break rear axles on the big size red machines, and breaks walkers on the big size green walker machines.

So my 2 cents on the "usable" life span of a red rotor is really quite location and crop specific. If you do custom work or have a crop that has a very narrow time window to harvest, or is abrasive to the machine, and dont have the labor or desire to do your own maintainence and repairs, that will lower the usable life span considerably. If its your own machine and your crops are spread out time wise, and you are mechanically inclined, that lengthens the usable life span considerably. JMO
 

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There is a huge difference between running 3,000 hours in rice or 3,000 hours in wheat. I've heard that one hour of rice is comparable to two hours of corn and four hours of wheat from a wear standpoint. We ran a 1440 to over 4,000 hours without any major work and a 1460 to 3,200 hours without much work at all but they weren't seeing near the volume of grain that an 88 series machine would be running.
 

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Doorknob, I sure understand what you are saying about relative wear and abrasiveness of certain crops compared to others. Having talked to a few other PNW grass growers/harvesters, I am amazed by how just youthful their combines all look on a grass "diet" as opposed to our typical central Plains machines.


Yes, rice is the example of the opposite extreme.


However, most combines live and work in the balance of wheat, corn, soybeans and sorghum. I'm going to bite here and say that without total replacement of any but the normally-"disposable," high-wear parts, most combines should deliver a life of around 5,000-6,000 hours before major issues come up. This is again, not brand-specific.


BTW, Doorknob, I just recently learned that your type of tires used, have a required by law, heavier carcass and ply rating. However, just due to your terrain and stresses put on them, they only last about as long as ours do on the Plains.
 

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Okay, enough already! I've seen enough here to know this is deviating from the original topic, so please stop the combine wars or off-topic posts will be deleted. The first 3 posts are the only ones really on topic, here.

I have to agree with Kirschenman and TxFarmer's first posts. I sure did not see Kirschenman as being "evasive," but rather just saying the life of a combine is indefinite. Only an indeterminate answer. I concur. One only needs to look back at Jon Hagen's old combine to understand this.

TxFarmer also has a valid point. Not everyone wants to keep replacing tires, separator components, sheet metal, finals, trannies and even engines as well as all the normally-replaced, high-wear parts for a single combine to be eventually passed down to second and third generation farmers.


Realistically, 3,000 sep hours does seem like a rather short life--in fact, way too short--for any combine. If I could only expect a $260,000 or more combine to only last 3,000 hours, I'd HIRE it all done! I see a lot of 5,000-or so houred Flows and Max's with as much, too. Still decent, sound bines.
I don't know what all has been replaced over the years, but I seriously doubt it's been through 3 sets of tires, 2 finals and 3 engines by then, either! Good grief!



Quote:I hear 1500 on a sts and their shot a 2388 will last forever esp if you put extended wear parts in them the augers and tin work are the weak point

That's another thing, Farmertony. You just said yourself, you "only hear it." Now I want YOU to stop and just THINK about what you said because it is mindless ramblings just like this, that CAUSE much of the color, brand or even combine bashing that goes on here......
Just what kind of logic could possibly dictate that one combine will only last a paltry 1,500 hours while another could last forever.....???

Don't you think that either or more logically, BOTH brands of combines could "last forever" if given all correct replacement parts, including those special high-war ones along with augers and tin?

Get back on track! Stop the annoying bickering over who has "the best...."

9520, I do hope the 3 of us have given you a basic answer, based on what we've seen with combines.
 

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A mate of mine has a 2388 with 2500 sep hours and I think it could do that many again if it was looked after...

For the record, I traded a 9650STS with 2200 Sep Hours on it last year and she was still going strong. I think the dealer spent about $20,000 Australian on it in his yard after i traded it though
 

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Quote:Doorknob, I sure understand what you are saying about relative wear and abrasiveness of certain crops compared to others. Having talked to a few other PNW grass growers/harvesters, I am amazed by how just youthful their combines all look on a grass "diet" as opposed to our typical central Plains machines.


Yes, rice is the example of the opposite extreme.


However, most combines live and work in the balance of wheat, corn, soybeans and sorghum. I'm going to bite here and say that without total replacement of any but the normally-"disposable," high-wear parts, most combines should deliver a life of around 5,000-6,000 hours before major issues come up. This is again, not brand-specific.


BTW, Doorknob, I just recently learned that your type of tires used, have a required by law, heavier carcass and ply rating. However, just due to your terrain and stresses put on them, they only last about as long as ours do on the Plains.


Oh??,...that is interesting Combiness. I know the new R3's I just put on our 1680 were in fact 16 ply. The old good year R3's were 12 ply. I wonder why the law requirement. ?

I'll have to remember your line about the "grass diet".
It applies well to what the combines do.
 

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I don't think it's the kind of law that you will see the police running about and checking your combines' tires for. Instead, it is a manufacturing standard for the hillside [aka diamond tread, turf] tires. I just learned that tidbit of info from an engineer/technician.
I DO plan on further visits by phone with this party, as I'm collecting lots of data on hillsider combines.
 

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Quote:I don't think it's the kind of law that you will see the police running about and checking your combines' tires for. Instead, it is a manufacturing standard for the hillside [aka diamond tread, turf] tires. I just learned that tidbit of info from an engineer/technician.
I DO plan on further visits by phone with this party, as I'm collecting lots of data on hillsider combines.


Ok, now I know what you mean.
Hillside machines are a different deal are'nt they?
 

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Quote:I don't understand how poor straw management proves that a 9600 is a durable machine.
We had a very good, heavy, high-yielding wheat crop this year. We were/are very blessed. I could not get to all the wheat I had to cut, this year, in a timely manner, so I got one of my neighbors to help. He came over with a JD 9500, and it did not have a chopper, only a straw spredder. That is where the "poor straw managment", as you call it, came from.
 

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We had 3128 hrs on our 1997 2188 when we traded it in on the 8010. We ran a 30 ft 1020 and a 8 row corn head. We put about 2400 acres of wheat corn and beans on it a year. Average wheat yield is 75-100, corn 150-225, beans 35-60 bupa. Here is the major stuff we had done.......

Elevator Chains.......Clean Grain & Tailings
4 feeder chains
2 feeder drums
4 sets impeller blades
6-8 bubble up augers
bubble up auger tube
2 unloader augers & 2 full Tubes(Helmet & all)
Poly liners under Grain Tank Augers
1 set Grain Tank Augers
1 full set of chrome moly rasp bars(originals were not chrome moly)
1 set of vanes in the transition cone
1 set of PTO clutches every year
1 set of gears & shaft that run the auger bed
1 set of shaker bushings
Top of the clean grain elevator was replaced twice(Both side panels)
Bar that braces final drives
In 2005 we replaced every bearing regardless if it needed or not.

This is a list of major parts over the years not counting the small stuff. When it left it needed this......

Feeder house floor
Feeder chain
Rotor balanced
Bubble up auger
Top of clean grain elevator side
Auger bed
Tube from re cleaner elevator to rotor cage

Does this give you a idea.....
...... If this is wore out then a old Gleaner or Massey , or a 1480 is what?
 

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combiness I see you on here as moderator what are your credentials ? I've been running harvesting machines 35 years 915's uni's of all types every axial flow made byron's I personally wore out a 2388 in two years. took $16000 to make her go again. so just where are all the old 7720' and 9500's none around here all made in to scrap so many sts's traded in on 7010's my dealer has just been swamped (as well as 88's ) one of the new owners said he didn't know what a combine was. well?
 
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