The Combine Forum banner
1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at a new Lode King or Doepker tridem grain trailer. Are lift axles worth the weight and cost for farm use? Don't haul in the winter so just spring and fall and some hauling in the summer. 90% would be field to home.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,997 Posts
Looking at a new Lode King or Doepker tridem grain trailer. Are lift axles worth the weight and cost for farm use? Don't haul in the winter so just spring and fall and some hauling in the summer. 90% would be field to home.
About how many miles per year would you be using it for?

I agree with offroadnt, but we don't know how much using it then is. I know on my trailer that only gets about 30 000 km a year, it would be a waste IMO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,595 Posts
We went through that debate also when we bought our 2013 aluminum tridem Lode King and decided against the option for our use and figured that for resale the commercial guys who might want it would be buying a new one anyway !. But for ourselves, the reason we came to the conclusion it was not for us was hearing from both sales people up here and also truckers that had experience with our roads in the Peace Country and said look, see those black marks on the highway by every crazy frost heave we have, that's tires from lifted axles that hit the ground and skid which means its ruining the non turning tires as they will wear funny, be out of balance and have to replace them far sooner then if they had just been left on the ground. Some of our highways are just plain crappy up here, its not California Cruising. Also if driven in the winter with the axle in the lifted position, the one that is carrying all the weight and extended further down, if a pile of slushy type snow flies up and packs into the fender in just the wrong condition, then the trailer sets back down when loading, it could cause the tire to go against the hard build up and literally bend the fender and pipes on the frame as its trying to support the weight and if not noticed in time it could cause more damage if driven that way. Now it could have some merit on good roads for fuel mileage and might be better on gravel roads but it just sounded like another potential problem so we just crossed it off the option list and instead put all aluminum wheels on rather then steel inside and aluminum outers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,162 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Would probably be less that 15 000km/yr.

I like the idea of aluminum wheels all around, will look into that. Am planning on getting the tiremaxx inflation as well and that should help with tire wear. Tires will probably rot before they wear out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
459 Posts
Would probably be less that 15 000km/yr.

I like the idea of aluminum wheels all around, will look into that. Am planning on getting the tiremaxx inflation as well and that should help with tire wear. Tires will probably rot before they wear out.
I just bought a new set of Super B's with aluminum wheels and I got the Dura bright wheels for the out side and it was only $1300 more for them
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,776 Posts
Would probably be less that 15 000km/yr.

I like the idea of aluminum wheels all around, will look into that. Am planning on getting the tiremaxx inflation as well and that should help with tire wear. Tires will probably rot before they wear out.
If you have lines crossing between the tires you have to be careful in mud. Mud pushing up between the duals will break valve stems off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
I no longer do most of my own hauling, as a local company is willing to do it for much cheaper than I can. We got on the topic of those lift kits and he started to grumble about them. He thinks that due to the poor roads, he gets less mileage from the lift tires than the roaded ones. It was between blowouts and tires with skids in them that don't pass safety anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
869 Posts
We have lift axels on our doepker super bs and we found the main benefit is the ride is better on rough roads. On wash board gravel or frost heaves the trailers ride really smooth. No jarring and flexing on big bumps. I would want the lift axel to be the middle tire on the bridge, ours is the rear one and we had to replace the front bridge lift axel tires because it was scalping the top of the frost heaves and was damage like mentioned above. If it was in the middle I think it would help prevent this. Pretty nice option but not at all nessary for around the farm use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
338 Posts
I was doing a safety on a newer set of load king trailers about a yr ago. upon completion of measuring the tread depth I thought I would see if the raised axles were indeed wearing less than the other trailer tires . the trailer was farmer owned and maybe had 60000km at most. in fact all measurements were very close in depth with the tendency of the raised tires being a 1/32 to 2/32 less tread than the non lift tires . not saying this is the golden rule but that's how it was on this set
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,156 Posts
They came with the trailer I bought, but would not recommend them for your use. When loading in a soft field you will find the one tire that is down sinks in a bit before the others come down. Takes a while to come down also, so the suspension is lacking for a time. This is due to how fast a combine or grain cart dumps in the truck. Assuming you have automatic lift axles. If you have manual lift axles you will always have them down anyway, because who wants to stop and flip the switch every load from the field.

All aluminum wheels are a no brainer, resale will be much better if the trailer is kept clean.

Watch where the hopper openings are on the tridem trailers you are looking at and the size of the hoppers. If filling air seeders in the spring you want to make sure the products you use will fit in the trailer. For example I use a 3 hopper doepker and use seed, phosphate blend and urea. The urea hopper needs to be very large and the phos very small for me. I looked at a 3 hopper Wilson and there was no way the hopper split was going to work for me.

Also unloading at harvest may have an influence on your trailer choice. Lode King super b and 3 hopper tridems have the front hopper too close to the landing gear and it is very, very hard to get a swing auger under the truck and unload at max capacity. The trailer tends to dump on one side of the swing hopper. 2 hopper lode kings and doepkers do not have this problem. Adding a set of michels augers would also make this a non issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,595 Posts
It may not have been mentioned ( would depend on the brand you went with ) as to the whole unit being an open end steel/aluminum sloped unit or an all aluminum trailer, but with whatever unit you buy and if you are able to keep the thing OFF the winter roads so it never sees the salt or the insanely corrosive calcium chloride, that will make all the difference as to how long your unit lasts, wiring and all. And to further that, if you never hauled fertilizer with it, big bonus there too as its guaranteed that it will find its way into places you don't want it. A strictly grain hauled trailer that never sees any corrosion substances and has been taken easy speed wise on the loose gravel roads would last a very long time and still have a decent resale value at the end.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
I have two tri-axles with lift axles. They don't get a ton of miles so likely won't pay based on tire life. The nicest thing I find is that in winter when empty there is only one axle down and naturally it has three times the weight on it as a trailer without lift axles. For anyone who has skidded tires in the past:eek:, having a bunch of axles with almost no load on them is a real hassle! Lift axles helps with that.;)

Fena farms those Dura-Bright wheels are likely a waste of money on a trailer, because of gravel rash they won't last. Not bad on the front axle of a truck but otherwise too harsh of an environment unless you are strictly pavement.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
459 Posts
I have two tri-axles with lift axles. They don't get a ton of miles so likely won't pay based on tire life. The nicest thing I find is that in winter when empty there is only one axle down and naturally it has three times the weight on it as a trailer without lift axles. For anyone who has skidded tires in the past:eek:, having a bunch of axles with almost no load on them is a real hassle! Lift axles helps with that.;)

Fena farms those Dura-Bright wheels are likely a waste of money on a trailer, because of gravel rash they won't last. Not bad on the front axle of a truck but otherwise too harsh of an environment unless you are strictly pavement.
This trailer will be mostly just on pavement my furthest field is 2 mile from hiway and my yard is 1/4 mile from hiway which is where it will be hauling from but on another note I drove a winch truck with all Dura Bright rims for three years and it seened a lot of gravel mud everything you could imagine and they still looked great after three years
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,595 Posts
Hmmm interesting, the sales person we made the deal on our trailer also said don't bother getting the Dura Bright wheels if we drive gravel as that coating will start chipping off or at least that's what I thought it is, like a clear coat. Anyway I had no experience with it and just went on his advice.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top