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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

Running a 1980 N5, The previous owner put stacked flat bar helicals in the thresher side, appears to have done the floor mod at the feeder chain transition from front to rear. PO also put a series 3 feeder house on.

we took all but cover plate "a" off. running a 1985 N830 header.

we are grinding the cob pretty bad, we have the concave pretty open, and dad keeps cutting the cylinder speed.

Dont we need to be running it faster for less time in the rotor? concave is about right for cob diameter.

also, what kind of shoe settings should we have? dad keeps tightening it up and closing it down, down to 4-5 on wind, I think we need to open everything up and hog it, but you can only hog it so far in our ****ty corn, so I am thinking he may not be completely insane closing it down.

THe corn ran out of moisture this summer, and only about half of the plants have ears. there is a few green ones out there, but the rest is testing 12-14 percent.

Also, with the floor mod, I left the rear chain in the middle hole on the bottom stop. Do I need to raise it fully? top stop is at max height, aka bottom hole. front chain is definitely all the way high.

Any input appreciated,
Thanks!
 

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speed header up, crowd it as much as possible, if corn I shelling good open concave and speed it up till it starts carrying corn out. I had same problem with an N5 a couple years ago and I never could get it perfect but the more I crammed in it the better it did. if ears are small let feeder house drums down all the way to keep it from bunching up at transition points. This worked for me. if you keep running so much through tailings it will eventually shear roll pin in drive sprocket and that will be another fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
I think we should put the big finals and some 30.5s on and run the 12R30. This corn will probably be 25-35 bu. Just not keeping it full. Really should be running a M2 with a 8 row. :)

pulled cover plate A today, so its all open.

I checked accelerator rolls, and I think that is alot of our issue, getting a little wide in the middle. Dad ran along side, and said the kernels come skipping out, so I am thinking they arent being grasped fully by the accelerator rolls, and are being blown out.

we have cut air further, cut rotor further, and it seems to be doing better.

Will definitely need to do rolls before next time, but it should finish this year.
 

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With the p1 I always had to keep cylinder speed at or above 450 or I broke cobs and overloaded shoe. Cylinder clearance was set to just squeeze the cob a little. No reverse bars. Eliminating cob pieces allow wider chaffer and less air. It sounds contradicting but while high cylinder speed damages more grain it damages less cobs. Guess it has to do with the cobs staying in the cylinder longer and they roll more at high speed and at slow speed try to tumble and ride over the helical more. This may be why channel helical allow slower cylinder speed and maintain whole cobs more.

I set feed drums to float with bottom stop all the way down and top stop all the way up. Would have been better if it had the shocks on but mine did ok without them. Run as fast as corn head will strip the ears. Determine for sure if you have cylinder loss or shoe loss before adjusting any more.
 

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Running the rotor faster, generally breaks up the cobs less. That is true. I've never been able to run over 350 RPM and usually 300 RPM to keep the rotor loss in corn down to an acceptable level with 6 and 4 row corn heads. 450 RPM where I come from with no reverse bars would have 3 to 5 bushels per acre going out the straw chute. In your conditions, the concave should probably be at an inch opening. Very hard to give advice on the concave because I don't know if it is the old original design with the old "good for nothing" rock door, or the newer rock door that is independent of the concave settings. If you're trying to harvest corn with the 1 5/8" round end deep tooth chaffer, you'll never get a good sample. 1 5/8" square tooth is usually the best in corn, especially with the first 8 rows on a lever of their own. Run them up to 1/4" wider than the rest of the chaffer for better samples and still retain capacity. Like 5/8" on the front and 3/8" all the way on back for example This chaffer can deal with a whole bunch of cob breakup if you adjust it correctly. Air settings never above 5 as a rule. I even have slowed down the top RPM of the engine on N-5's by 200 to 250 less for low output corn crops to allow for slower shoe shake. In that case you just adjust rotor and fan up a little to match the lower engine speed. It really helps in a poor crop situation for cleaning. Drive as fast as you can and keep rotor as full as possible helps too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
we finished today.

cut cylinder speed even more, (down to 300-330) opened concave a little more (adjustment is getting very stiff as you open it further, freely goes from closed to about 1 inch, but further, it gets extremely stiff, allready buckled one ratchet adjuster. :) )

We also played with the shoe a little, (chaffer open a little more, sieve a tick tighter, more air)
And we finally achieved perfection in the bin, and near perfection on the ground. a few stray kernels, but considering the poor accelerator roll condition, very good.

just a few occasional kernels out of the discharge, usually 2-5 sitting on super spreader dic on shutdown.

Dr. Allis, this has the "S" update package, and I am 95 percent certain it is the new style door. there is a little bit of torch trimming on the body to make room for the latch. didnt seem to bother anything adjusting from closed to open.
 
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