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Whenever hay gets short we seem to chase every blade of grass we can see with the cutter. This, all too often, results in driving into places that we absolutely should not be and taking risks that would normally be avoided. Most of the time we get away with it but it only takes one tiny erroneous decision for things to become very serious.

The most important thing to remember in a short crop is that the hay is not worth being permanently injured or killed. Remember why you did not cut that piece of hay before. Hay can be bought to replace shortfalls, cattle can be shipped and replaced, you are the only part of the equation which can not be replaced.
I'm not following you , where death came in the discussion. It would take more than a drought to kill me.
You quoted lander, then edited that part out.
 

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I thought those were sweetgrass hills in that pic, but was thinking it was north side of them. I too would be very interested in value that gets placed on that triticale.
 

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I hear here in sask the govt is opening up some provincial forest to grazing. In 2002 guys were letting them go on their own. Usually when dry the bush has grass. Wonder how long before community pastures start calling.
 

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Seen some old crop advertised near Thorsby, AB, 3x4x8 bales shedded, $300/ton. New crop $375/ton, with feed analysis.

Remember, we're in a continental cattle market. Feeders will start moving further south or east if prices drop 8-10 c/lb. my brothers boss just got 100 900 lb-ers down from alberta... And he's in Ontario. Even if they only break even on trucking vs. buying local, they now have a massive selection pool for their feeders. A few Ontario producers are seeing a "perfect storm" for eastern cow-calf producers. Time will tell but if we can manage a larger-then-average culling this year, all beef guys will benefit next year, assuming reduced herd size props up the demand for calves. Lots of feed available in the east.
 

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I fear reduced numbers will start to hurt more than help. Bse and good crop prices reduced herd size enough. There are getting to be too few cattle to keep the plants open. JBS and cargill are the only notable plants left around. They mothballed moose jaw and a few others because there weren't enough critters left to kill and Nilsson brothers tried to outbid the independents like Neudorf into the ground. Less domestic plants means a higher basis because they go stateside. The mixed area I'm in I've seen plenty of critters leave, and this was a high density cattle area. I don't see it repopulating anytime soon. Guys are getting old and juniors coming up like to grow canola and not fix fence or bounce over mole hill infested hay land for two months of lake time. It's really sad because when we get a feed year(froze crops) there will be a surplus and no cows to add value. I remember a feedlot guy told me our whole cattle industry was based on the need to get rid of feed barley. Southern ab grows oodles of forage under pivot and the rest of the country either purposely grows feed barley or off grade feed grains. The feeding industry keeps the junk at home and adds some value.
 

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Hello Haystack
Yes. Relative Feed Value. I've never heard of RTV???
I think the poster just made a mental mistake in writing the acronym. Like R-is short for Rela, T-is short for tive, and V for Value.

Perfectly understandable it's just like ID.
I- is short or I, and D- is short for dentification.
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