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Purchased a Brock SQ16 last year. Had the canola off before the snow hit last year so have only used it for wheat so far. In the past, 10.5 moisture was the max we would harvest canola. Now with a dryer, I am curious what kind of moisture level is reasonable to expect a dryer to handle. What are you guys taking your canola off at and what temp are you. running your dryer at. I am running in batch mode. Started taking canola off at 14.7 moisture. Sitting in a air bin till the propane truck gets here.
 

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165 degrees heat. Start at 50 minutes. 10-15 minutes cooling
Also it will unload a bit faster than your wheat did so you’ll wanna cut back the unload time percentage
 

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My GSI is 165F at 10 min a point. When canola moisture gets above 14, I usually do 11 min a point. When moisture levels get extreme usually a little extra time is required. I cool my batchs 35 min. Might be different for different dryers but the temp of the grain is near the outside temperature when doing this. Never had any surprises afterwards doing this. The setup man at Glenmore I had (Collin) told me never skimp on cooling. The cooling part of the equation is the cheap part. Cooling it in the bin afterward isn't the same as there isn't the airflow that the dryer produces. I have done 15 canola with mine and worked fine. I have heard guys saying they had to run it through twice but not sure why you would want to. I think they just assumed the 10 min a point thing and never tested the grain coming out until it was too late and had to dry it again. Heating the grain takes the most money. Adding a min or so a point, to do the job right the first time, is way more cost effective when the grain is already warm and in the dryer.
 

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My GSI is 165F at 10 min a point. When canola moisture gets above 14, I usually do 11 min a point. When moisture levels get extreme usually a little extra time is required. I cool my batchs 35 min. Might be different for different dryers but the temp of the grain is near the outside temperature when doing this. Never had any surprises afterwards doing this. The setup man at Glenmore I had (Collin) told me never skimp on cooling. The cooling part of the equation is the cheap part. Cooling it in the bin afterward isn't the same as there isn't the airflow that the dryer produces. I have done 15 canola with mine and worked fine. I have heard guys saying they had to run it through twice but not sure why you would want to. I think they just assumed the 10 min a point thing and never tested the grain coming out until it was too late and had to dry it again. Heating the grain takes the most money. Adding a min or so a point, to do the job right the first time, is way more cost effective when the grain is already warm and in the dryer.
How much does this change when drying at outdoor temps of 0 to -5? Do you use the on/off or hi/lo burner?
 

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Run a GSI, first half 150F second half 165F cool for 20min. Have dryed up to 26% in one pass and never had any issues. I find outside temp doesn’t affect dry time as much as humidity and grain temp. Higher % of greens also seems to add to dry time.
 
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