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We run 9600's on our farm and have always had conventional machines, so I'm very familiar with conventional combines. Lately ive been looking to start upgrading combines and perhaps try a rotor combine for the better clean grain sample and capacity as we are growing much higher yielding cereal crops and canola crops. Ive heard when doing canola that a rotor wont ad much benefit other than cleaner sample. we have trouble spitting cereals out the back of our 9600 when yields push 90 bpa. I would like to stay with JD combines for many reasons and have looked into the T670 conventionals but they are out of my price range for the better years for those combines. Seems like the 9770 and 9870 rotors are in my price range and have heard good things about the 2010's and 2011's. Hope to get some feedback
Thanks
 

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That was my upgrade from 9600 to 9770 and still have it! it has been very reliable and has almost double capacity in cereals notably in hot dry conditions, way less damage to grains and you will keep a fair bit more grain! I did like that old 9600 but sure not going back. the only crop that it might be better in is flax! but you might have a tough time keeping grain? I have my 9770 with precision elements and mad concaves. running 40' macdon fd2 on the front. put er through a green light every year! I would love x9 to be my next upgrade! lol! only in my dreams!
 

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9770 I would say is Deeres best combine since the 9600. Excellent machines but they do take more maintenance compared to the 9600s. The big thing to watch for us the maintenance records for the machine you are looking at.
 

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went from a cts to a 9770. big jump but well worth it. we have a great jd dealer close by that makes jd a no brainer. you will be using the parts and service departments often so having a dealer close by is pretty important.the big deal going from a 9600 that is very simple and user friendly to a little higher tech unit that will need a service tech and a lap top to track down the codes. all the other parts are easily repaired or replaced. around the same time i also bought a 540c challenger aka massey and have been very happy with this unit.
 

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A very solid reliable machine the 70 series

You won’t regret it
No better in canola than your 9600 but yes more through put in other crops

Avoid the 9870 unless you think you need the HP to drive the chopper. It has no more tonne/ hr capability than the 9770.

Can’t think of any negative things really except for the crappy small cab.
Ya just gotta keep an eye on everything that moves and change out some components at certain intervals. Ie: shaker box arms

Some components on these weren’t built with the longevity of the 9600 stuff
 

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We run 9600's on our farm and have always had conventional machines, so I'm very familiar with conventional combines. Lately ive been looking to start upgrading combines and perhaps try a rotor combine for the better clean grain sample and capacity as we are growing much higher yielding cereal crops and canola crops. Ive heard when doing canola that a rotor wont ad much benefit other than cleaner sample. we have trouble spitting cereals out the back of our 9600 when yields push 90 bpa. I would like to stay with JD combines for many reasons and have looked into the T670 conventionals but they are out of my price range for the better years for those combines. Seems like the 9770 and 9870 rotors are in my price range and have heard good things about the 2010's and 2011's. Hope to get some feedback
Thanks
9770 Was the pick of the crop pre S series. If its got more than 3000 rotor hours you would want to consider replacing the entire shoe frame. They crack and can cause a lot of downtime right when you dont want it. Its not that expensive if you use non JD parts for the side panels and they will last the rest of the useable life of the machine. Along with the hanger arms especially the big ones that take the crank thrust. The only other real gotcha with those machines is the liner height problem, make sure that has been sorted or budget for that expense.
 

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9770 Was the pick of the crop pre S series. If its got more than 3000 rotor hours you would want to consider replacing the entire shoe frame. They crack and can cause a lot of downtime right when you dont want it. Its not that expensive if you use non JD parts for the side panels and they will last the rest of the useable life of the machine. Along with the hanger arms especially the big ones that take the crank thrust. The only other real gotcha with those machines is the liner height problem, make sure that has been sorted or budget for that expense.
Liner height problem? What do you mean by that?
 

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Engine cylinder liners. They weren't the right height (not tall enough) and led to a fair number of engine rebuilds on the 9 litre engines of that vintage. Not sure on the specifics of the failures but I'm sure others will post on this.
 

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9770sts might have been one of the best combines deere built. But, they truly get better the newer they are. Great combine. Will cut way more than a 9600 per hour. They are getting older. Have it inspected.
Most will plug tailings before you run out of power or start throwing over in wheat. If it sees kochia or russian thistle, the tailings plug. Most, I have ran one that will eat right through anything and never plug tailing. The capacity on that one was the worst of any I have used. I have no idea why.
In 50-80 bushel HRW it took me 4 hours to get it adjusted properly. Working on rotor or covers, sucks. They build the machine around them and are never ment to be removed if you ask me.
Just go buy a case. much easier to set and work on.

I think you buy can a small fridge from Deere to put your beer in. Might need the beer running a deere. Haha
 

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Never owned a 60 or 70 series but have welded on a few. Poke your head in under the feeder house and have a look at the gears that run the bed augers, The plate that the bearings mount to is one of the more common things I’ve had to fix. Chopper hinges and mounts are second, then regular wear areas
 

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We had 3 9870's during that time frame. We also had a 9660 that did not too much less than the 9870's. In y
The higher hours of use the rotor cover tops would start to wear holes through them. They are easy to work on and prefer them over the 9600's Solid combines
 

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2010 and 2011 have updated wiring harnesses and most likely have the heavy duty feeder house option checkmarked. This allows quite a bit of flexibility for running newer headers.

powercast choppers will let you spread straw to 40 feet, but won’t be perfect. Standard chopper will be maybe hit 30 feet. If you notill or plan to the chopper will be the biggest thing to look for.

like others have said, in most crops you can power out before throwing over too much. Much easier for older operators who have to “keep the combine full”. If you consistently have 90 bpa Crops a 9870 would maybe be better, but would need a more attentive operator to keep the grain in the combine
 
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