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Discussion Starter #1
For that amount of acres a ih 1660 in good condition with a 20 ft head and 4 row corn head can be bought for under 40 thousand leaving you some money for a grain cart and truck. Ih combines are extremely simple and easy to work on. As for what to check, check every plac that grain or crop material flows for places that are worn through, augers, chains, shaker bushinhs,etc. As a general rule of thumb ih combines are better in corn and Deere combines are better in beans unless the beans are dry and then it's a wash. With any brand of combine, expect plenty of downtime until you learn the machine and how to work on it. If you keep the machine a while, it will get easier as the years go on
 

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thanks in advance for opinions, and info.

1. I will be harvesting about 450 acres, half corn and half beans.

2. I wish to get a combine that I will use for the next 10 years or more, so I want to get the right combine. I am currently thinking 9400 or 9500, or 9410/9510 depending on what I find in the best condition at the right price

3. what do I need to look for when looking at a used combine. as I have never had a combine I am a little nervous of having problems. My father sold our old jd 4400 15 years ago when I was 12, "when grandpa retired" so I have never worked on a combine, only vague memories of riding with my grandpa, as he did all of our harvesting.

4. the reason I am now looking to buy a combine is that I plan to take over the farm in the coming years, and next year I will be in half and half with my father and I cant see paying to have the crops harvested. when I can do it myself. and start paying for some equipment instead of just giving the money to someone else.

and in the end I am looking to spend around 60-70k total with a good 18 or 20' bean head and 6 or 8 row narrow corn head. and are there any options/features on the combine that I should look for.

again thanks for the advice in advance.
 

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Hire your combining done and spend your money on a planter and sprayer. You will have much more money in your pocket. Spraying your own crop will both save you money on the chemicals and force you to look over your fields when you can actually learn something about what kind of planting job you did and how well your crops are growing.

Find a farmer with a newer combine in your area and work out an agreement to help him with harvest if he will cut your crop on a timely basis. Almost every one is short of help at harvest time.
 

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good to know about the 1660/1666,

ease of use is a good thing.

as far as red or green either is OK, as both case ih and Deere dealers are very nearby, I would probably stay away from gleaner as there is not a very close dealer that I know of.

thanks again for the input
 

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"bent" we have planters/sprayers, and we currently hire another farmer to harvest our crops, however at close to 20000 per year for harvest/trucking I feel I would be ahead after 4 or 5 years
 

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Actually for the money you are considering investing you could probably buy a descent 2188, the round cab is sooooo much nicer trust me.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I was in the same position as you 7 years ago. I knew nothing about combines as I was 1 yr out of college and my family had always grown cotton. But we started growing grain so we needed a combine and the only experience I had with one was with a gleaner k2 for a few weeks. But after talking with a lot of area farmers we decided that the axial flow was the way to go. If you are new to combines I believe that dealer support should be your deciding factor. It will save you MANY headaches as you learn your machine. All brands make good equipment but all have their positives and negatives. After you learn about combines, each machines positves and negatives should weigh more when you decide which brand to go with. In our case Deere support was good but case ih was excellent and I have leaned on them heavily in past years. Working on a combine can seem daunting at first, but after you finish a repair job you will realize that it wasn't as bad as you thought it would be. For example, I can now pull the rotor out of my 1660 in less than an hour. And the thing about buying a little older machine is that you will know it frontwards and backwards within a few years. Not necessarily from repair work in the field, but with the annual upkeep with these machines. I have been extremely happy with my 1660 and I have put in a lot of money to make it the machine that I want it to be with upgrades such as greenstar yield monitor, afx rotor, unloading system, etc. Even now that I can afford a newer machine, I plan on keeping this one a while longer cause I know what I've got and I don't want to start the whole process over again. But the axial flows are very simple and easy to work on but I think your first decision should be dealer support and then start looking at machines. By the way I have all colors on my farm such as blue tractors, green cotton picker and sprayer and red combine
 

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I would think if the man had wanted an Axial-Slow he'd have gone to the C/IH board to inquire. Have known several people with 9400/9410's who loved them, Maximizers are not that difficult to maintain or work on, and from personal experience, I think the 1660 is a bit of a pooch. He's got a good chance of finding a well-cared-for 9400 Series combine. And in green-stem beans the 9400 will walk all over the 1660.
 

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Cruz, ole buddy, if you have not done so yet, take look over on CaseIH board. There is a thread that discusses a direct comparison of a 9410 and 2166, which, if you are open to a rotary, and you said your were, is a pretty fair discussion.
If it was me, and I had the funds you are willing to spend, I would not consider anything less than a 2166, as a rotor. A 1666 or 1660 are going back in time comfortwise, if you are comparing to a 9400-9510.
The axial flows are excellent machines, but don't let the talk about repairs and simpleness scare you away from the Maximizer walker. They are very user friendly machines, in my experience.
When you talk to your sources and do your research, ask them what you have to do to change between corn and soybeans with a rotor and walker. I don't know about changing between corn and soybeans with a Max, but we change between soybeans and milo by simply adjusting the little levers in back for the sieves and chaffer, and push three buttons to change cylinder and fan speed, and concave spacing, switch heads and go.
I don't know what it takes to switch between corn and soys with a rotor (STS or axial flow), if there are grates, and wires and fillers and bars, or just push a few buttons. But, check that out.
I am sure someone will post on here real shortly the crop changing drills for both machines. I am curious myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
To change from corn to beans on an axial flow I adjust the feeder drum down one notch, speed up rotor, adjust vanes to fast position, tighten concave a bit and close the shoe a little. Takes me about 15 minutes. I leave the separator bars on the rotor because it's a pain to remove grates. I compensate by moving the vanes to fast position.
105diesel, the man asked for advice on combines in general and did not specify jd only. I gave him advice on case ih because that is what I have experience with. Notice that I didn't bash jd because I have no experiene with one. Next time try to not get so bent out of shape. I agree with you about the green stemmed beans. I am limited to about 3 mph in 60 bu green stemmed beans with a 20 ft head on a 1660. But I can also shell 1800 + bu/hr corn with no fear of throwing any out the back
 

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Now that the red underwear brigade got their shot at you, I will try to answer your question regarding features/options.

First, a 94xx/95xx will be plenty of combine for the acres you are cropping, 450. In fact, those machines will handle 2-3 times that amount if you have visions of expanding in the future. You wll probably only be putting on 60-75 separator hours per year, so if in good condition when you buy it, it will last you a long, long time at your projected acreage.

Second, stay away from the early 9400s, 1989-1991, with the small engine, unless it is an absolute steal. Make sure any 9400 you look at has the 414 ci/6.8 liter engine. Their were mechanical problems with that engine and they are 30HP less than the 414. The small engine will handle your acreage, but.

Third, as far as other options, I assume you are looking at combines in corn/soybean country, so they should be set up as corn machines. Variable speed feeder house is one feature that should be standard on corn machines and the concaves are different, I believe.

Fourth, make sure it is not an imported grain machine, and if it is, make sure it is set up for corn. Your dealer/salesman should be able to answer all those questions, talk to the former owner, and if from an individual, ask the same, but it is probably obvious you are in corn country and looking at corn machines.

Corn guys may have some better input for you, but you won't go wrong with these models.

Of course, if you aren't color blind, you can save another $10,000 over the red machines and get a Gleaner R50 or R40. Just remember, there is a reason different machines are priced where they are, and you do get what you pay for.
 

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105, I agree with Rob. We do not have a vested interest in either color as far as far as selling or promoting goes. We just feel that any combine shopper should consider all angles and options. He could ONLY chose one page or the other to post, but not both. The John Deere page just happens to be on top and is the first seen by most.

Now to further concur with Rob, I cannot agree more with you, about green-stemmed beans. This is one year they were bad here, on the beginning of first crop, and most recently, the second crop [planted after wheat]. Cruz did not mention the condition of his beans, but I'm sure he will hear enough as to the combines, the closer he comes to his buying decision.

Tractor, thanks again, for the input as to the thread comparing the green and the red. It's all good info. I'm certainly not trying to steer him from a Max, but just let him know that a Flow sure has its merits on the simplicity side. Other than that, as per stated above, one gets so accustomed ot a particular combine, that making repairs do come easier with the seasons.


One more thing, 105, it's AXIAL-FLOW, not "Axial-Slow."
 

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Tractor8100, what is with the "red underware brigade" comment. Nobody was being snotty, just offering some honest feed back based on experience. From what i've seen the maximizers are very reliable and good in tough conditions. The axial flows tend to be less combine in tougher conditions but more combine when it drys out. I've never cut corn or beans, i live in wheat and milo country and where i live with our conditions and crops we can walk all over a 9600 with our 2188. But us in green stem beans and i'm sure the story would reverse. Cruz if you consider a Axial Flow and are willing to spend 60-70 i love my 2188, it is so much nicer then our 1480's for visibilty and all day comfort. Cheap upgrades that make an axial flow hum are extrude honed injectors- $300, Kile Rotor Flighting- $995 for 80 series $1095 for 60 series, and pfparts.com rotor $3300 for 80 series if you grind lugs off your self and don't get the upgraded elephant ears. To you john deere fans you have great combines i'm not putting them down, just expressing my experience...Red Undy Dude Out!!
 
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