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Massey was everywhere here. Dealers too. Had one in our town and life was simple then. We had Massey snowmobiles 440 WT, 300 ST, tractors 1500 4wd, pull type swathers, #63 press drill. combines over the yrs were a 27 with electric header lift, 90 sp, 750, 760 V8 hydro. First combine I got to drive was an open air 90 special. Dad wouldn't let me on the 27 because I might lift the header up and down too much killing the battery lol. After the 90 we got a Gleaner C2 and then a F2. These were one simple combine and gas powered as well. I hand pumped gas into these things every morning and got arms bigger than these pretty townboy weightlifters in my era lol. The gleaners parts were 80 miles away and the 750 was everywhere and a bigger machine so we went back to Massey. Seemed everyone had a Massey back then. Very rare to see a Deere anywhere really or a new holland. We bought our used 760 hydro and chewed with it for some yrs until I picked up a used N6. The 6 would combine circles around the 760 it seemed and the cab was light yrs ahead as well as the cylinder and seperating technology. It would be interesting know how many bu of crop were taken off by these old Masseys. Any old footage of custom combining seems to have a fleet of Masseys. There were so many in salvage yards that you could keep one running forever it seemed.
 

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No Don I don't think so. I'm a couple thousand miles south of you in Texas
My error, sorry and thanks for clearing that up.

I thought you were the local gentleman that keeps a bit of crop out to run a Super 92 through at the end of every harvest season as a family/community harvest wrap up party.:54:
 

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My error, sorry and thanks for clearing that up.

I thought you were the local gentleman that keeps a bit of crop out to run a Super 92 through at the end of every harvest season as a family/community harvest wrap up party.:54:
Thanks for thinking of me Don and a very fair assumption you were talking to me. :) I have tried to host my harvest party the last two years with the super 92 and my two 92's but mother nature trumped me. I had to bring out the big iron and clean up the plot before it snowed. Just like farming for real......"There's always next year". However I did test the standing canola a few times with the super92. It worked very well as 12 feet of header generated way less tough canola than 36 feet.

https://photos.google.com/u/1/photo/AF1QipMNydOZKKwgkAN75H--r4KTZfbz_mj-6zXqP9pB


I've attached a photo of the three of them in action and attempted a link to a video of testing the canola.

Have a great day.
Kevin
 

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yes they were Don when MF intodued the 510 410 and 300 way back in 1963 as '64 models. IH introduced there's on the 15 series and JD was late to the party not until '79 with the titan series.
Wow, 15 years to respond to the huge advantage that offers.
Shows one Deere not much of a force in the industry...back then!
Did MF hold any application patents perhaps?
Think the TR70 was NH’s first hydraulic swing, albeit a bottom swing.
 

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Thanks for thinking of me Don and a very fair assumption you were talking to me. :) I have tried to host my harvest party the last two years with the super 92 and my two 92's but mother nature trumped me. I had to bring out the big iron and clean up the plot before it snowed. Just like farming for real......"There's always next year". However I did test the standing canola a few times with the super92. It worked very well as 12 feet of header generated way less tough canola than 36 feet.

https://photos.google.com/u/1/photo/AF1QipMNydOZKKwgkAN75H--r4KTZfbz_mj-6zXqP9pB


I've attached a photo of the three of them in action and attempted a link to a video of testing the canola.

Have a great day.
Kevin
Neat!
First combine I ever drove.
Super 92
 

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Here's an excellent (but lengthy) article from the chief test and development engineer of Massey Ferguson; - an excellent read. Page 66 and on talks more about the TX series development but, if you have a keen interest in Massey's fame to failure, I encourage you to read it cover to cover!


http://www.legacyquarterly.com/pdf/masseyfamilytale.pdf
Thanks for the article link, fascinating read.

I always wondered how they did tests on combines etc in the off season, and how they evaluated what was going on inside the combine, now I know. If any manufacturer would have followed through with some of his ideas, such as capturing the already separated grain starting at the feeder house, it would be a much more efficient canola machine.

Regarding the competition, he gives credit where credit is due, and is brutally honest where they have shortcomings, he is certainly not a fan of the JD auger beds, but acknowledges their electronics as being ahead of the competition.
 

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First combine I drove Super 92 with no cab and 2 rows of 2x12 for grain tank extensions.
We skipped the 510 and waited for the 550. 550 was easy on fuel with the naturally aspirated 354 Perkins, but we had problems with short straw plugging the space between the grain pan and the sive.
Skipped the 7 series and went to the 850 with the natural aspirated 372 perkins. that was a poor engine choice for a combine it had to lug to build torque not what you want for a combine. I bought a 354 turbo engine from a 760, rebuilt it and turned the pump way up that turned it into a combine!! Had a little trouble not slipping the main drive belt with all that power. The 760 and 860 had one more belt on there main drives. It sure was nice picking a 30 foot swath, pulling a chaff wagon, climbing a hill and unloading on the go and not dropping any RPM. Solid stream af smoke out of the stack, lots of guys said that engine would never last, the guy who bought it from me still uses it .
I hated that combine.
My wife was mad at me when plugged the header on the John Deere we bought and unplugged in in seconds instead of using that stupid big wrench to turn the MF backwards.
 

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Wow, 15 years to respond to the huge advantage that offers.
Shows one Deere not much of a force in the industry...back then!
Did MF hold any application patents perhaps?
Think the TR70 was NH’s first hydraulic swing, albeit a bottom swing.
MF 's was hydraulic swing from the get go !
 

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I have tried to host my harvest party the last two years with the super 92 and my two 92's but mother nature trumped me. I had to bring out the big iron and clean up the plot before it snowed. Just like farming for real......"There's always next year". However I did test the standing canola a few times with the super92. It worked very well as 12 feet of header generated way less tough canola than 36 feet.
Kevin
Super sampler!
Can see how you were weathered out last two years, oh well.

That link isn’t working Kevin, would love to see Super 92 canola sampling!
 

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I was 10 years old, first combine i drove was a massey ferguson 82, those combines had a variable speed that when you back off on it it would actually go into neutral and stop, there was an roller in the sheave that the belt would ride on when the sheave got wide enough.
We have ridiculous hills for the area, dad never explained anything, we mostly had to figure out operating stuff for ourselves. (if this was on youtube these days mom and dad would be in court) Lol, Well, i got to the edge of one of our biggest and as i started going down i started to back off on the variable speed, of course went to far combine free wheels, and i started accelerating down the wondering what the heck is happening, about midway I slammed the variable speed forward the sudden momentum change brought the rear wheels right off the ground, and i was doing and enddo wheely down the last half of the hill, when i reached the bottom i had invented the first round bale.
Went back to school, Kids were getting up telling there show and tell stories from the weekend. Nobody believed me, Lol

We farmed with those masseys for years, when i left to go into the military Dad bought a 550 that is still on the farm and i use to this day. I even still have the original pick up belts on it. That combine never slept outside, she was in the shed every night, i have taken every part of that machine apart, reliable as he!!, haven't had a need to upgrade yet. I am still amazed that i have a cab with AC, You haven't farmed until you done harvest in an open station combine, late fall, cold wind blowing the chaff down the back of your neck, knees frozen stiff, standard steering and brakes, the horse flies biting you in the low spots, and then hit a patch of canada thistle, Lol, sneezing and choking trying to get the fluff out of your nose.

Dad always commented that those combine made a lot of farmers rich.
 

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First combine I drove Super 92 with no cab and 2 rows of 2x12 for grain tank extensions.
We skipped the 510 and waited for the 550. 550 was easy on fuel with the naturally aspirated 354 Perkins, but we had problems with short straw plugging the space between the grain pan and the sive.
Skipped the 7 series and went to the 850 with the natural aspirated 372 perkins. that was a poor engine choice for a combine it had to lug to build torque not what you want for a combine. I bought a 354 turbo engine from a 760, rebuilt it and turned the pump way up that turned it into a combine!! Had a little trouble not slipping the main drive belt with all that power. The 760 and 860 had one more belt on there main drives. It sure was nice picking a 30 foot swath, pulling a chaff wagon, climbing a hill and unloading on the go and not dropping any RPM. Solid stream af smoke out of the stack, lots of guys said that engine would never last, the guy who bought it from me still uses it .
I hated that combine.
My wife was mad at me when plugged the header on the John Deere we bought and unplugged in in seconds instead of using that stupid big wrench to turn the MF backwards.
Yeah that 372 engine was no ball of fire hey.
Think they only had like 80hp when we used to put them on the dyno at the shop.
Some of the very late 800 series with the 354.4 charge cooled engines were much better, almost as much power as the AV8 540.
Nope I don't miss that cyl wrench either.
 

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Probably old news but its interesting to know that at least one prototype Massey combine survived. This picture (and many others) can be found at HOME - Massey Ferguson and I would have merely posted a link (rather than copy and paste a photo), had the photo not been found in a slider (can't link to a specific photo on a slider). So.....I apologize if my copyright infringement has offended anyone; - its just great information to share.
 

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If memory serves me well (and lately it hasn't), wider cab, controls off to the side, hydro control moved fore and aft with the seat, different hydro charge pump from the legacy 700/800 series (apparently against engineers advice, it was a cost-cutting measure by corporate), enhanced sound dampening in the cab, enhanced cooling system. Probably other stuff I'm missing. I also read where Bob Dougherty) also had a previous prototype to this one, though I can't remember the model. The Massey TX903 rotary prototype had a similar cab, though don't ever tell a Massey engineer that it was a White cab (ouch). :)
 
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