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Discussion Starter #1
Roughly 20 years back my family donated a well used MF 205 combine to the local historical society. They recently told me they had gotten a better/newer combine, and wanted to know if I'd like to have the 205 back.

I have no place to keep it and no use for it, so I told them "no". But I asked if it was O.K, if I looked for a new home for it rather than seeing it scrapped. They said that was fine.


Here's what I know:

The combine is in central Illinois - Roughly 75 minutes NE of St. Louis.

It has a 2 row 40" corn head and a 10' or 11' grain table that go with it.

They tell me that the combine runs, and they shelled corn with it in the fall of 2018. I have not driven it myself for several years.



I located one picture of it, which you should find attached. You'll notice that I added a non-stock muffler along the right side, as the thing was awfully noisy.



If another non-profit antique machinery club is interested in the thing I'm pretty sure they'd just give it to you. If a private collector want it I'll put you in touch with the people who can make a decision. But I'm certain it would be relatively inexpensive.


If a home isn't found for it I'm guessing they'll scrap it. But that decision is not up to me.



If you're interested, I'll try to check back in here over the next few weeks. Or you can email me:


rsitruss at yahoo dot com




Thanks.
 

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That's kinda neat. Cant say I've ever seen one. Was it before the 510s or a smaller one? Guessing cabs where optional?
 

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The 205 was built the same time as the 510 (45 in. cyl.) 410 (37 in. cyl.) and 300 (32 in. cyl.) it was the smallest of the series, if I remember right, it had a a 27 in. cylinder.
 

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Interesting the engine was behind the hopper, then they moved in front and right of cab, then behind hopper again.
Thought that was neat as well. Who ever decided that needed to be right next to the driver needs to be kicked in the sack! I remember my dad had a 8820 and the a/c was cold but if it was tshirt weather it never froze you out. The first year I ran it it blew a freon line. 2 days out for a new one. What a miserable sob! Never got cold during the late season tho.
 

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I wonder why they couldn't keep their numbering system consistent. 405 was a pulltype version of the 410, so one could assume 205 would be a pull type as well, but no.
 

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Thought that was neat as well. Who ever decided that needed to be right next to the driver needs to be kicked in the sack! I remember my dad had a 8820 and the a/c was cold but if it was tshirt weather it never froze you out. The first year I ran it it blew a freon line. 2 days out for a new one. What a miserable sob! Never got cold during the late season tho.
The reason the engine was by the cab was to keep the center of mass of the combine lower. With the engine at the back it raises the height the engine sits about 2 feet. The other thing prior to all your warning lights and buzzers it was easier to see if an oil line or filter ruptured and if something was going wrong you could hear it. You gotta remember this was a design prior to cabs and hauling these machines for custom cutters was on the back of a grain truck. By the mid 70's would've been the time to change this, but these companies MF, JD, and White had heavily invested in this design. We were down at a customer appreciation event with MF in 1983 and they were questioning us if engine should be kept where it was or moved back behind hopper the majority of us picked keep it the same.
 

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What engine was in the 205?
When I find my literature on these I'll tell you for sure, but from memory it came standard with a slant 6 Chrysler about 50 hp.. These combines were built from 1966 to 1970 and about 1751 units were built. They had replaced the MF 35 built from 1958 to 1964.
 

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Found the info. the engine used was a Chrysler 170 cu.in. 6 cyl. The 300 used a Chrysler 225 cu.in. 6 cyl. and a optional Perkins 203 cu.in. 4cyl. The 410 used a GM 292 cu.in. 6 cyl. and optional Perkins 300 cu.in. 4 cyl. The 510 used GM 327 cu.in V8 and optional Perkins 354 cu.in. 6 cyl.
 

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Found the info. the engine used was a Chrysler 170 cu.in. 6 cyl. The 300 used a Chrysler 225 cu.in. 6 cyl. and a optional Perkins 203 cu.in. 4cyl. The 410 used a GM 292 cu.in. 6 cyl. and optional Perkins 300 cu.in. 4 cyl. The 510 used GM 327 cu.in V8 and optional Perkins 354 cu.in. 6 cyl.
Thanks. I've seen and even ran a few 510s and a 410. Have yanked a few 327s out of 510s. A friend of mine used to run them in combine derbies. Used to see a lot of MF machines around. Would say it was half Massey and half others.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Covering a couple of questions -



Yes, cabs were optional. We had a pair of 205s without cabs, and a pair with cabs.



As kids, the ones without cabs were cool. My brother and I would climb up the ladder when the combine was moving. (They were incredibly slow) We could climb up over the back of the seat and sit in the hopper. We sometimes even climbed over the engine, opened the back hatch, and watch the straw walkers work.



(Yes, I know it wasn't safe. But we were expendable and usually unsupervised)




The engines on all of the ones we had were the Chrysler slant 6. They always seemed to run well. I don't recall ever having engine problems except for typical points/plugs.



The capacity was very low. I recall my Uncle once saying that you had to set a post next to the thing to make sure you were moving.



If you pushed it a little, the threshing fan housing would fill up with grain.





If you guys are interested in more pictures I'll try to dig some up.
 

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Found the info. the engine used was a Chrysler 170 cu.in. 6 cyl. The 300 used a Chrysler 225 cu.in. 6 cyl. and a optional Perkins 203 cu.in. 4cyl. The 410 used a GM 292 cu.in. 6 cyl. and optional Perkins 300 cu.in. 4 cyl. The 510 used GM 327 cu.in V8 and optional Perkins 354 cu.in. 6 cyl.

The last 510 gassers used the GM 350 ci.in V8. My family purchased one around 1975. We would have rather had a diesel, but would have had to order one. Combines of all brands were evidently scare in our area of Ohio at that particular time so we bought the 510 gas to ensure we’d have a combine. It was a great combine for us. The 205 is certainly a cute little machine.
 

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The last 510 gassers used the GM 350 ci.in V8. My family purchased one around 1975. We would have rather had a diesel, but would have had to order one. Combines of all brands were evidently scare in our area of Ohio at that particular time so we bought the 510 gas to ensure we’d have a combine. It was a great combine for us. The 205 is certainly a cute little machine.
The 350 was the replacement engine for the older ones as well. GM stoped the the 327 in 69 I believe. The combine engine was the "industrial" version. Most had steel cranks,small valve heads and small lift cams. Always wanted to run a 510 with the governor un hooked just to see what would happen. Lol.
Agreed that 205 looks pretty neat.
 
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