The Combine Forum banner

61 - 80 of 114 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
Every opener assembly on every quantum in Aus is slated for replacement with upgraded assemblies, premature wear and failures at various points of the openers partly exacerbated by insufficient hydraulic damping capacity. Dunno what the retail on a complete opener is but it would have to run to 4-5 mill at least in costs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Not sure what all is involved but EDC, Economic Development Canada, is somehow tied to the money not being paid...that was in the affidavit in the link MF posted
Payments have nothing to do with warranty or the Aussies threatening not to pay. The payment due date is negotiated with the distributor ahead of time each year for all new orders. EDC provides insurance for the order and usually there would be a bank factoring plan in place to pay Morris ahead of time for the huge amount of equipment shipped in containers from summer through to January. There was no factoring available this year so Morris did not collect any money on Australian shipments for the last 8 months. That is a lot of iron on the books with no revenue. Usually there would be domestic orders for revenue too, but I think it is quiet this year and there is inventory at the dealers to consume also.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,299 Posts
Discussion Starter #63
This is a little surprising to me that Morris has a distributor in Aus.
They have been shipping equipment to Aus for many years.
I would have thought they would have done that all in house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,200 Posts
Not the first time an overseas seeding rig manufacturer has scampered off back home from Australia with their tail between their legs.

Here's a rundown on the latest issue from Morris:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,200 Posts
5 inches! My God ,China isn't that much farther to go from OZ ! shesh, A tool bar seeding over 5 inches deep is asking a little lot in soils with a concrete hard pan. Nothing would work perfect. I know a farm that added concrete weights to there 1890 disc drill and that resulted in serious frame failure.
Desperate times call for desperate measures, but yeah, that's fairly common in Australia. Penetrate through up to 5 inches of dry dirt to lay the seed into moisture, with 1-2 inches of dirt over the seed and packed with a narrow wheel. It's called "moisture seeking". Large seeds like peas and especially beans are capable of emerging from quite a depth. Wheat and barley not so much. Unreliable planting rains, high rates of evaporation and unreliable post planting rains are the reason for this method.


The drill doesn't make it rain
Get it in deep enough and it doesn't have to rain. :)
Getting that emergence is key, then the crop can be grown mostly on stored subsoil moisture.
 
  • Like
Reactions: biglil

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,495 Posts
Now they just need to ship 4500 lighter duty openers back to Canada and get the steel pile cut and welded into 50 or 60 drill frames. They might want to put the skinny knives on those ones with a broadcasting kit on the front and then drop them into the greedy ring at Ritchie’s. Don’t build the air carts unless there’s a deposit at a dealership. Almost any existing cart is workable.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,752 Posts
Maybe should have sent a couple drills over to do some tests in the worst possible conditions rather than sell a bunch. But it seems farmers are the ones that get to do R and D and durability testing these days on their own (down)time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,322 Posts
Back to the court filing......sounded like they were planning on collecting on debt not sending 4500 new opener's. I'd say the chances of that getting squared up are slim to none now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
983 Posts
I know a person that works the crisis hotline in Iowa, said last year call volume was exceptionally high. It is sad and scary.
Sad and scary pretty much sums in up!
Hear more and more ads for ag suicide hotlines and support groups lately, radio, news papers and even the cards pamphlets on how to help others ect. as previously mentioned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Maybe should have sent a couple drills over to do some tests in the worst possible conditions rather than sell a bunch. But it seems farmers are the ones that get to do R and D and durability testing these days on their own (down)time.
Morris ran two drills the previous seeding season (2018) in Australia and five units in North America and had very few issues. The decision was then made to do a full launch of the product. Seeding 2019 conditions were similar to 2018 but many Aussie growers seeded through the dry in 2019 (higher than normal hydraulic settings) rather than stop seeding and wait for rain. The auto-pack system also created a scenario where pressures could be automatically ramped up on the machine to maintain packing in tough conditions even though pressures were then well above recommended operating pressures.
Reports coming back from Australia on the update campaign are revealing that only certain areas of the country had damage and many of the units that Morris staff have been to do not have damage on the row units.
Sad situation. Limited release of machines would have prevented a lot of the concerns, but hind sight is 20-20.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,495 Posts
. The auto-pack system also created a scenario where pressures could be automatically ramped up on the machine to maintain packing in tough conditions even though pressures were then well above recommended operating pressures.
Artificial intelligence doomsday scenario. Same as Boeing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,513 Posts
Good speculation on a winters day. Degelman buying Morris is kind of a little fish eating a big fish in my mind. Morris used to be a big company with Degelman a small niche market supplier but no doubt Morris has lost a lot of ground over the years. The investment fund lending money either means Degelman is investing in something big or risky, or both since they should be able to self finance day to day operations. Of course the other possibility is they are pulling a Morris and setting up for an explosion in business from the resurgence in the farm community over the next 5 years and so expanding. I worry everytime I drive by their plant and see the 40-80 Protills, 10-20 100' harrow units and miscellaneous rollers parked along the highway. Either they are moving a lot of product or they have a lot of inventory. That place never had equipment piled up like it has the last two years. Hopefully it means business is that good, the alternative being business is that bad. Modern day trends seems to be company's over produce during bad times then hope for the best so it is hard to say. Perhaps this Morris thread is aiding my belief.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,486 Posts
Good speculation on a winters day. Degelman buying Morris is kind of a little fish eating a big fish in my mind. Morris used to be a big company with Degelman a small niche market supplier but no doubt Morris has lost a lot of ground over the years. The investment fund lending money either means Degelman is investing in something big or risky, or both since they should be able to self finance day to day operations. Of course the other possibility is they are pulling a Morris and setting up for an explosion in business from the resurgence in the farm community over the next 5 years and so expanding. I worry everytime I drive by their plant and see the 40-80 Protills, 10-20 100' harrow units and miscellaneous rollers parked along the highway. Either they are moving a lot of product or they have a lot of inventory. That place never had equipment piled up like it has the last two years. Hopefully it means business is that good, the alternative being business is that bad. Modern day trends seems to be company's over produce during bad times then hope for the best so it is hard to say. Perhaps this Morris thread is aiding my belief.
Sounds a lot like grain farming
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
413 Posts
word on the street is that Degelman was/is in trouble themselves, that is why they needed the cash injection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,351 Posts
I went by the Degleman plant this summer for the first and only time, and was shocked at the amount of equipment in their yard. I wouldn't have thought the entire Western Canadian market for Pro-tills (and similar machines) was as big as the number just sitting on their lot. Is this becoming, or was it expected to become a piece of equipment that every farm has to have?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
This was inevitable IMO, a lot of companies are "restructuring" probably don't quite understand that they are all way overpriced. Or maybe I'm in the minority unwilling to spend $500k on a drill.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
481 Posts
This was inevitable IMO, a lot of companies are "restructuring" probably don't quite understand that they are all way overpriced. Or maybe I'm in the minority unwilling to spend $500k on a drill.
Hey in my world. 500 k buys the drill/tractor and combine
 
61 - 80 of 114 Posts
Top