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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i have had a 1998 2188, then a 2003 2388, then a 2005 and 6 2388, now a 7120 in 09

i have run 36' honeybees on the 2388s and found them to work great with proper combine setup, third lift cylinder, weight package in rear, and long auger with extension, and guidance

as for issues with the 2388, i found the new afx rotor to be a real winner over the old standard one, also always seamed to have some issue with return in tough conditions, and also feeder house issues in tough conditions, but over all a very easy machine to set and problem free in first 600 hrs, did have the bushings go out on me on the 03 model, as for yearly maintence, i would replace spreader bats, and elephant ears every 600 hrs, as for issues durring harvest, i would ususally go threw a rotor belt or two, return chain gave some issues as well

my 2388s were all turned up or chiped, i would guess close to 400hp, going by boost pressure

on average would put on 300 hrs a year

now for the 7120, this year being new i had a fair amount of issues for a new machine... to list a few in the first few days
hydro pressure 3000lbs shy, feeder chain jumped sproket more than once, deslug featured gave issues, computer froze up 10 times in two days, broke a few unloading auger shear bolts in peas, and found book settings for crop to be way off, lengine torque was low, overall monitor is a bit overwelming at the start

now for fuel consumption, i was able to do 220 acres on a tank, in 50bu crop, 20gph on meter, my 2388 would do close to that on 400 less liters

as for easyness to set i was not happy with the 7120 at first, but by the end of harvest it was easyier to set then 2388, found loses to be a bit better with 7120 once i understood how to set machine

i have a 2152 40' header on the 7120 and would think i drove about the same speed in general as the 2388 with a 36' head, [5 TO 7MPH)so that would be a 10 percent gain in production

i had a 320 acres that was seeded lighter than i wanted and ended up bushling the best, in this crop with less material i seen the 7120 do 1750bu/hr and would maintain this for football feilds in lenght, i never seen my 2388 go over 1350bu/hr, but then this feild was phonminal.... on this same feild i was able to try out a 8010, and seen 2100bu/hr for football feilds to compare, both combines ran at less than 8 seeds per foot out the back in durum wheat

we tried over four different chips in the 7120, and never did find one that worked, kept throwing codes, but now i have been told there is one that will work, with 300lbs more torque and better fuel consumption

i found the feeder house to be a bit stronger as well the spreader system, on the 7120, had no problem spreading over 40', but then the 2388 almost spread 36'

i liked the propusion leaver on the 2388, must of hit the unloading button 20 times by accident, found the cab of the 7120 to be much bigger and more comfortable

found the larger tires on the 7120 to make the combine more stable than 2388, but found ride to be the same

as far as final comparsion, i would say that the 2388s are very hard to be beat for their size and price, they are also very simple to work on, simple to fix and simple to run, i found you need a new learing curve for the 7120 that takes some time to understand, and the price tag is considerable more, not sure if i would do it again

i will say i ran with a few 9860jd and the 7120 ran circles around them with less loss, like 50 percent more, my older 2388 would of done better i would bet, class 8 my ass, maybe a six
 
G

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excellent review. I have been wondering how the 7120 is working out, and how it compares to the 2388 and 7088.

That last part, umm it might ruffle a few feathers.
 

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After years of the traditional axial flow combines (the old pull types, 1688's, 2188's, 2388's) we made the switch to a 7120 halfway through harvest namely because we were sick of unplugging rotors with tough kochia or lentils. This year all the dealer had that would fit this combine was a 30' 2020 header, but we will be moving to a 35' 2162 Flexdraper next year. I would agree with almost all of what bussard said. We only put 120hrs on since we were halfway through when we got it, so I won't say I know the combine in and out, but have a pretty good idea of how to operate and set it. I found the torque and power curve to be good. I loaded the engine all the way to 139% power at one point and saw the boost go to 46.6psi another. She does smoke a bit and likes fuel. Our hydro pressure is too low and will be getting bumped up when the unit is in for a winter inspection. The gear on the little electric motor that moves the concaves came off so had to replace that (a pretty dirty and awkward job) and apparently this has happened a lot.

Dual Tires make the combine very stable on hills and help the ride when going over badger/gopher holes. The unloader should be faster and stronger. With the issues I know other local guys have had with shear bolts on the unload system, I was always leery of putting the tents in the tank up more than 2 notches. We never had any issues with the rethrasher plugging, but I'm not sure it is all that effective at actually thrashing grain.

It did a great job on lentils. It was very gentle on them and pretty easy to set. In durum it was great. It seemed it didn't matter how I set it, the sample was amazing. Wheat however, much different story. We tried tons of rotor/fan/concave/sieve adjustments and the sample was acceptable at best. I couldn't get a clean sample, and I couldn't go over 4mph without throwing a bunch out the back. The wheat was pretty heavy (at least for us, 55bu/ac) but i showed that the limit on this machine, in our area, is the cleaning system, not the horsepower. On the old combines HP was always what held us back. I've only ran a Deere for a couple days (9760sts) but it seemed similar to that. You could go as fast as you wanted, but it all went out the back end past 4-5mph. We didn't have the hard thrash kit (which you shouldn't need anyways when you drop $400K on a new unit) but I was in a field with 2 7120's and 1 7010 that all had the kit and its sample was as bad or worse. This combine in wheat was the biggest disappointment for us. I'm sure there are better settings than what we were running, but we tried alot. It shouldn't have been so difficult. perhaps some interrupter bars on the front concaves would help.

The monitor worked well for us. No sensor problems or error codes or freeze ups. It can be a bit tough to see in sun in any position, but not bad. I found the moisture and yield calibrations didn't work well. I'm sure it is a good system, I just didn't take enough time to learn the whole system and just used the fast calibration wizard. There will be a learning curve with this system.

Changing the concaves are alot quicker and easier on a guys back than the old combines. The rotor de-slug feature is the best thing on this combine. I'm not afraid to push it in lentils and weedy conditions like I was the 2388. I used it 4 times and wasn't down more than 20 minutes in total. With a 2388 I would have lost 8-10hrs and would have had a miserable job to do. Also, sieve adjustment from the cab is the cat's meow. The Combine tends to stay alot cleaner around the engine than our 23's, and the rad's unbelievably clean. I would say the system did an excellent job in very dusty conditions.

The cab is great, and I would go as far as to say it is the best one on the market. Visibility is good, and I really like the big window into the tank, though it needs to be cleaned daily or even more often.

All in all I like the combine. I'm excited to get a better header for it as the 2020 doesn't feed wheat well at all and I was even getting backfeeding in heavy lentils. I know I have alot more to learn, and look forward to knowing this combine as well as I did the old style. If I had my choice over a 7088 and 7120, I think I'd take the 7120 for the deslug, the ease of concave change (which we tend to do alot), the cab and the cooling system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
after reading big time operator comment, i do regret that i forgot to mention the deslug feature, he is correct that this is the best feature or option on the combine over the 2388, and saved many hard hrs on my body, ussally up and running in less than a minute... makes you cut stuff you normally would not like bad kotia spots, heck of a lawnmower...

i willl also admit that the unloading auger should be faster and was at least 20 seconds longer than the green ones to dump, i found yeild and moisture to be very close to deeres, but way off in mustard and canola

we did a fair amount of good yeilding wheat, and have the small wire, large wire combo, and did a very good job, was told this by the deere guys as well, sample was good, concave around 3, rotor around 1000, it was eatonia, ran it to 120 percent hp most of time, never seen my meter go over 130 percent or 48.5 boost,

ran the steinbauer updated chip today to help a buddy finish up and seen boost hit 54psi, never pushed a code either in the hour i help him, felt stonger as well

in peas we moved big wire to front and small wire to back, had a bit of losses over rotor and will find another set of big wire for back next year

as for headers i would recomend the 2152, dual knife drive, pea auger combo to anybody, what a great header for the 7120 and the 8010 i drove, beats the honey bees i had before, never hit the ground, or get rocks stuck in the canvases, and cut logged crops, revenes as good as the HB,
 
G

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What makes the 7120 so hard to set in wheat? is it because of the new cleaning system using the Self Leveling Shoe and active grain pan vs the old auger bed?
So if HP isn't an issue and cleaning capacity is, is the 8120 a better fit with the larger shoe?
 

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bussard; when you ran around 120% power did you have much going over the sieves? Four of the 7000 series I've ran all had terrible throwover issues. On mine I ran the bottom sieve at 6-8 and the top sieve at 10-14. The ground was littered with grain if I pushed it over 90%. We used all small wire concaves. Fan 980-1000, rotor 970-1100, concave 2-5. Where did you set the sieves at? Fan? How was it you figured out the feeder chain was jumping the sprocket?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ran concave very tight, takes a bit more power but sample had very little white caps,top seive was 16 if i remember right and bottom around 8, fan was around 850=1050, rotor around the 850 to 1000 depending how fit and dry crop was, we had heavy wheat this year, 67lbs and wheat thrashed easyier than normal i thought, pre seive on 5 pluged on six,, i know for a fact i checked it a few times and was very happy with loss, i thought it was better than 2388, i have a buddy that has a 7010, and he was happy with his loss in general as well, maybe the variety, or the year... do remember return running giving alarms every so often

i had a hilly revene that natorously it would be green after losses from the combine, with the active grain pan this year results look much different, another good option

as for the feeder chain jumping, it would starting to slip the clutch more and more, finally did a check and sure as heck, after that it happened easier and easier, finally had to replace feeder chain and feeder slip clutch

as far as 8120 being a better fit, the 8010 i ran was hard to keep full and ran most of the time less than 100 percent, in certain conditions threw the draws it was nice but used 3 gallons a hr more fuel, 60 acres less a tank

i think our crops do not require that big a machine for our dryland, arrigation now is a different story
 

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According to our local combine guru that presented a combine clinic in June up here, one should never run the combine over 100%. If you run over 100%, the rotor, fan, sieves, etc, all are not running at their optimal speed any longer and so you won't get optimal threshing and cleaning. Also the engine will be lugging way down and fuel consumption will be way ip. He says it is best to keep the combine between 90 and 100%.

Personally I don't know how people manage to keep their machines running over 120%. For me, my machine only hits over 110% when I hit a lump or something and I always get an Engine RPM alarm; I don't see how the engine can say running at a consistent RPM over 110%.
 

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I have a 7010 with a 35' MacDon FD70. The preseive is a very critical setting on these combines. It greatly affects the amount grain put out the back. I set mine on 4 or 5 . I am very pleased with the performance of my combine.
 

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When setting the pre-sieve, how do you tell what number it is on? Do you count the notches from the top or bottom. I used 2-3 down from the top.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
on wheat i used hole 5 from closed, hole six worked a few days but pluged off when it was tuff
 

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In general we are very pleased with our 7010 over our old 2388. We just finished our second season with it. We have found the 7010 to be about 50% more capacity than the 2388. We farm mostly irrigation. In 60 bu/ac canola we were going between 5 and 6 mph on fairly heavy 18ft swathes. Heavy wheat was about 4.5 mph for 30 ft straight cutting. Quite a bit faster than the old machine. We have not had any major loss problems on any crop. We have had some tailings problems on the hard thrash crops like HRS. But we also had tailings problems on the 2388 in the same crops. We do use the hard trash kit on the rethresher, but we have no idea if it helps anything or not.

In general we found that the built-in settings in the computer for the various crops were pretty darn close. One thing we learned the hard way is that some of the conventional wisdom over the years concerning sieve settings didn't work on this combine. I'll have to ask my brother about the specifics, but in almost all cases we went back to factory settings and things worked out pretty good.

If you ever need to do a thorough cleanout of the combine, the 7010 and 7120 will be so much easier than the 2388. We have to do this every time we go onto a seed canola crop. Takes about 2 hours. It's very easy to clean the inside, thanks to the large side panels. And the grain tank is way easier to clean than the 2388.

The CVT transmission on the rotor is more reliable and more efficient than the old rotor belt that was always slipping. It doesn't make any sense anymore to watch rotor RPM since the computer will try to hold it constant up to 100% engine. So we just load the combine to between 90 and 100 (as I said in a previous post).

There are a few goofy things. First we never use the buttons on the console to change rotor or sieve settings. For some reason they don't just move by one unit. Instead they act more like the old 2388. We make all our changes in the ACS section of the computer. More exact and it remembers the settings from year to year. The computer is complicated, but once you understand how it works is pretty flexible. Someone talked about the computer crashing a lot (maybe in another thread). At the combine clinic they said that you can minimize the computer crashes by waiting for the computer to boot up completely before starting the engine. We have not had a single problem since we started doing that. The trimbal autosteer system is not quite as good as John Deere's, but it works. I don't like how you can't nudge your track like you can in John deere. You can shift the track but it's not easy to say, move the track to where I am now, like you can in john deere with a single button. Instead you have to start a new swath and have the computer move to that swatch. I have to say, though, that at night the display that shows your whole field and where you are and what you've done is helpful!
 
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