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Swathed wheat overwintered will in comparison with same field spring straight cutting

  • A. Yield more

    Votes: 34 46.6%
  • A. Yield less

    Votes: 27 37.0%
  • B. Grade better

    Votes: 11 15.1%
  • B. Grade worse

    Votes: 51 69.9%
  • C. Be easier to harvest

    Votes: 46 63.0%
  • C.Be harder to harvest

    Votes: 25 34.2%
  • D. Weigh more

    Votes: 20 27.4%
  • D. Weigh less

    Votes: 40 54.8%
  • NOTE: 5 polls at once, one vote per lettered category. Votes can be changed. Thank you!

    Votes: 1 1.4%
  • Additional test question added below

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • E. I like the poll format (multiple questions and votes)

    Votes: 5 6.8%
  • E. I do not like poll format (multiple questions and votes)

    Votes: 2 2.7%

  • Total voters
    73
  • Poll closed .
21 - 34 of 34 Posts

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Just curious. When you have enough mice to wreck a field of barley over winter, what the hell do you do when you gets seeding it again in the spring? Don't they wreck the seeded stuff also? I have seen youtube videos of the mice problems in Aus. Does it looks similar?
My lord man! Don't you watch the news?? I see you changed your avatar, might want to think about changing it to something else!
 

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Mice droppings in the grain sample will likley also be a big problem. Hopefully it is better than you think. That creature has such a ability to multiply when conditions or right and the predators can not get to them when stuff is under the snow. Hopefully crop insurance will help you out.
 

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Just curious. When you have enough mice to wreck a field of barley over winter, what the hell do you do when you gets seeding it again in the spring? Don't they wreck the seeded stuff also? I have seen youtube videos of the mice problems in Aus. Does it looks similar?
I have never seen it as bad as what Aus can have. I 'm sure that most of our barley wont make any grade this spring due to high amount of mouse droppings that i am seeing. Do have a cattle farm nearby that has offered to come and bale it up and use it next winter for cattle bedding material for next winter. Other option is to turn the fan right up close down the sieve and combine it without saving the grain. Have done that in the late seventies when crop was left over the winter and infested with mice.
 

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Discussion Starter #25 (Edited)
Just curious. When you have enough mice to wreck a field of barley over winter, what the hell do you do when you gets seeding it again in the spring? Don't they wreck the seeded stuff also? I have seen youtube videos of the mice problems in Aus. Does it looks similar?
Fortunately, no.

I’ve never heard of mice in an overwintered crop doing any harm to the subsequent growing crop. Until just now. From BoSoT.

I “think” the TM6 chaffer and grain sieve in a Claas is mouse proof meaning it will walk them over not plugging it. Never found one in it yet but times the mouse numbers by a million, who knows?!
Hope so!
 

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Mice droppings in the grain sample will likley also be a big problem. Hopefully it is better than you think. That creature has such a ability to multiply when conditions or right and the predators can not get to them when stuff is under the snow. Hopefully crop insurance will help you out.
I dont know what crop insurance will do. still having issues with them for last springs canola crop we harvested. They came and inspected the canola samples and graded it a 2 once its cleaned but have taken samples to cleaning plants and not one of them want to risk even bringing it in due to the hantavirus that could exist. Its only around 2000 bushels but still. The woes of farming.
 

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I have never seen it as bad as what Aus can have. I 'm sure that most of our barley wont make any grade this spring due to high amount of mouse droppings that i am seeing. Do have a cattle farm nearby that has offered to come and bale it up and use it next winter for cattle bedding material for next winter. Other option is to turn the fan right up close down the sieve and combine it without saving the grain. Have done that in the late seventies when crop was left over the winter and infested with mice.
So it is because of the presence of mice excrement in the grain that it is ruined? I thought you meant, they ate all the grain.
Was wondering how many mice do you need to eat up a 100 bushel crop:rolleyes:
Our mice problems is usually at seeding time, when they will feed on the sprouted grain.
 

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Mice can eat through a hundred bushel crop and this year could be one of those years but not usually. Heavy snow cover and say this snow last till mid april they can still do a lot more damage. Some of my barley has been laying in a swath since September 10th of 19 so they had a very early start. Usually by the time spring comes along and snow disappears a lot of the mice will have move on. Its not like everyone in our area has crop left out so so there's not huge amount of areas for the mice to mass produce like you can see in Aus.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Some of my barley has been laying in a swath since September 10th of 19 so they had a very early start.
Never thought of that angle Brian, in my case the wheat was swathed just before the snow that has stayed ever since.
Some swathed with snow already on it. Swather research you understand.
Such late swathing could possibly help keep mice numbers down.
 

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My kid brought a book home from school one time to read, was about predators and had a page on mice and how they feed the predators. I can't remember the exact numbers, but from one pair of mice(male and female obviously!) within a year could produce offspring in the range of 100,000. That wasn't all directly from the pair, but went something like this, gestation only lasts a couple weeks, they have 6-8 babies, within a few days they can get pregnant again while still nursing the first batch, by the time the next batch is born the first batch can become pregnant, and the cycle continues. It was both amazing and disgusting at the same time.
 

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My kid brought a book home from school one time to read, was about predators and had a page on mice and how they feed the predators. I can't remember the exact numbers, but from one pair of mice(male and female obviously!) within a year could produce offspring in the range of 100,000. That wasn't all directly from the pair, but went something like this, gestation only lasts a couple weeks, they have 6-8 babies, within a few days they can get pregnant again while still nursing the first batch, by the time the next batch is born the first batch can become pregnant, and the cycle continues. It was both amazing and disgusting at the same time.
Two falls ago I never saw a mouse while picking bales, last spring they were everywhere. I hate them but know they are necessary for the predators to survive. I had up to 3 traps in my combine until I found the hole in a rubber boot that was out of sight.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
I didn’t get the poll properly set up initially with a multi question/multi vote poll making it difficult to follow, didn't know I could, so I’ll do the math at this point, I also can not alter poll close date/time.
I’ll just divide each category out separately and you said...
Swathed...
A. 56% will yield more
B. 80% grade worse
C. 66% easier to harvest
D. 75% weigh less

I added a late question if you liked the multi question/multi vote poll format but only got one vote, 100% liked it!

I fully agree it will grade worse and weigh less, iffier on harvestability or yield.
 

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Since we are on the subject of mice damage and some of you were wondering if crop insurance will do anything, the answer is no (at least in Alberta). I have had this argument for 4 years with AFSC that they are not taking into account the damage that mice and deer do to crop left out but it falls on deaf ears. Basically the crop and grade loss over the last four years coupled with the markets and low yields has meant that on our farm 5 crop years have turned in 4 income years. If I had my choice this spring I would only take the baler out but I know full well AFSC will make us combine.
 
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