The Combine Forum banner

561 - 580 of 627 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
573 Posts
Looks like there is no need for a left/right side cylinder. Just change the direction of the rasp bars to make it a left or right side.

On a side note.... Would rotor bearings longevity be an issue with the heavier SB rotors?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,786 Posts
Looks like there is no need for a left/right side cylinder. Just change the direction of the rasp bars to make it a left or right side.

On a side note.... Would rotor bearings longevity be an issue with the heavier SB rotors?
SB actually only makes an aftermarket cylinder and impeller. The cylinder does not seem to cause any more/less bearing issues. The impeller, for some reason, I have heard, will eventually take out the right bearing. Fortunately, this bearing is super easy to change. Sure enough, mine went out, maybe less than two years of the SB impeller install. But it also has several hours on it so who knows.

Claas likes to use bearings that don't require perfect alignment. I think in general, they are better than most.
160639
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,607 Posts
Seedcleaner was it the inner drive side bearing that went out and how many hours were on it? A person has to be so careful when putting the cylinder in to not over torque the crown nuts and preload the bearing. I think the crown nuts only need 30ftlb of torque and then and a extra 1/8 of a turn. The problem is that guys like us do not thpically have a socket that fits the crown nut to allow us to use a torque wrench. When you tighten it with a chisel it is hard to know what torque you have.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,534 Posts
Discussion Starter #567
The forces applied to the cylinder when threshing are greater than the weight difference plus the large and type of bearings as SC pointed out plus they are on the auto greaser make the additional weight no factor to bearing life.

I‘m really disappointed none of you farmer/engineer/physics experts have not picked out the key difference between the cylinders and the effect that has.
So....
160642

160643

One more chance!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
The forces applied to the cylinder when threshing are greater than the weight difference plus the large and type of bearings as SC pointed out plus they are on the auto greaser make the additional weight no factor to bearing life.

I‘m really disappointed none of you farmer/engineer/physics experts have not picked out the key difference between the cylinders and the effect that has.
So.... View attachment 160642
View attachment 160643
One more chance!
Sunnybrook Rasp Bars have a hollow space underneath??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
It looks like the SB cylinder bar mounts and bars extend past the drum, where the factory ones do not. I would expect that means the drum itself is narrower. I'm not sure how that would change performance, but it probably does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,786 Posts
Obviously, the SB is totally enclosed for a much more balanced feel. We have already gone over that haven't we?

The thresh bars are much farther apart...something you certainly like on the feeder slats as well Don.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
Over here I don't know a single farmer using aftermarket/retrofitting parts...
10 years ago some people used different sieves, but never cylinders or concaves.

Either we don't know the advantages, or we trust the original manufacturers that they find the best solution after years and Millions of R&D Budget...

Sometimes it seems canadians first thought with a new machine is: "What could I possibly replace first...?"

:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,327 Posts
Over here I don't know a single farmer using aftermarket/retrofitting parts...
10 years ago some people used different sieves, but never cylinders or concaves.

Either we don't know the advantages, or we trust the original manufacturers that they find the best solution after years and Millions of R&D Budget...

Sometimes it seems canadians first thought with a new machine is: "What could I possibly replace first...?"

:D
I have a sunnybrook conversion machine running against 5 OEM’s and it has not made a single lap on any of the other ones. Ever.

Some folks just have to tweak **** to sleep at night. 😂
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,607 Posts
The Sunnybrook impeller is a big help if you are in conditions where it wants to plug. The one advantage of the Sunnybrook cylinder is the shaft does not twist and cause the drive pulley to wobble. As far as performance my stock cylinder has preformed as good as the Sunnybrook. As far as modifications on both of my machines I have fabricated a large knife at the back of the concave so all the material is cut or split as it leaves the concave by the cylinder which has the most robust drive. I personally think this is place to cut the material rather than at the impeller.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
453 Posts
The rasp bars are flush to the edge of the cylinder drum on the one and go past the edge of the cylinder drum on the other one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
The Canadian conditions are a bit different to, let's say Europe. The harvest window is quite small.... The biggest difference, at least what I experienced are the windrows. That is pretty common and makes it a bit tough to split the material again for the rotors. In green stem beans it is the same story.... Straight cutting is way easier, but through the weather conditions up north not always possible.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,534 Posts
Discussion Starter #579
Sunnybrook cylinder looks like it might be smaller diameter tube with the rasp bars sticking out further. Would allow more room for material to get through.
The SB bar and stand is more straight (like your ZAPS) to grab and feed more aggressively.
I finally have my two gold star award winners, congratulations!
But I‘m not thinking so much material flow, in this area the last few harvests here have been scrape crop off the ground action, rocks having their way with combine internals.

Note the Claas rasp bar and the even shallower attack angle than the previous model.
I had cylinder and concave damage with this setup,
160648

A rock wedged right against the drum at the leading edge of of the bolted on rasp bar bending the drum in.
Of course if you bend the drum on one side of the rock you bend concave bars on the other side.
The shallow attack angle causes a strong wedge action and limited room leads to more damage.

Ran an SB cylinder threshing flat wheat this spring
160649

The much greater height drum to rasp bar and the much steeper attack angle of the rasp bar support is much more likely to spank a rock out than wedge between the drum and concave.
And sure enough, put more rocks through threshing this spring in spite of the rock trap catching probably 90% of them, six rasp bars showed rock scarring but no bending damage to the drum, rasp bar supports nor concave.
The only have to fix items was some stationary chopper knives, some bent, some broke but in the scheme things minimal damage or expense.

Would an SB cylinder guarantee to never damage the concave nor cylinder from a rock?
No way, rocks come in a zillion different shapes and there is no predicting how interaction of rocks with the cylinder and concave will end up.
Seems the lineup of people to intentionally feed rocks into a combine for research purposes is kinda short.
But from a straight math and physics study and my limited experience a SB cylinder has quite an advantage for potential reduced rock damage to cylinder and concave from rocks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,607 Posts
Our rock dam on our fd70 has reduced the rocks coming into the combine by half. We have way less rocks to empty in the stone trap than without the rocks am on the knife. I know Don you do not like these things but I would not run a Macdon flex draper without it now.
 
561 - 580 of 627 Posts
Top