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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are the cages in the N6 and R62 the same diameter? I ask this because when you look at helical kits the N6 is never listed. In a previous thread Goalie David said he had installed some channel helicals in his N without much problem. Was wondering what the differences in the two cages are.
I'm needing to pull my rotor this winter to replace the cylinder bars and may change to the channel helicals if I can find ones that will work. This machine is used for wheat and milo.

Thanks,
John
 

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They are the same diameter. I have a P3 rotor with channel helicals in my N6 and would never go back to the P1 and flat helicals.
 

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You will have to make little blocks with holes in them to mount the channel helicals as the cages have different mounting holes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the information Pete. Where do the little blocks go? I think Goalie David said he played with the positioning of the helicals so that he did not have to drill new holes.

John
 

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The blocks go on the outside of the cage to hold the bolts where there is just a square opening. I have the 68° pitch in my N6 so the holes built in for the flat helical bars do not line up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ok, gotcha! How many different pitch options are there to chose from? Just standard and steep pitch or are there more?

John
 

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I got a kit from NDDan used large thick flat washers and serrated flange lock nuts to bolt through the cage. I have 4 seasons on them and haven't had trouble with them loosening off. I believe the channel helicals were out of an R62. I got a kit with steep pitch over thresher and standard over separator side. If I was to ever do it again I would go steep pitch all the way. I was also able to ditch my cage sweep since using the channel helicals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Krawler, do you think with steep pitch all the way through that you would need to keep the reverse bars or put the f2 bar in? I would also like to get rid of the cage sweep.
 

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I am learning I almost think the faster the crop moves through the rotor/cage the better. It keeps the crop mat thin and the seeds can separate easier. If you generally have tough straw conditions I don't think you want any reverse bars. If your straw is generally dry and breaks up easy you could get away with them. You would likely get more shoe load though. I put an f2 bar right in the bottom of the belly of the cage when I put in the channel helicals and I've never run without it. I think if you felt the crop mat was moving too fast there's enough room to install two of them to restrict flow. I get a bit of build up of straw on the top of the cage and on the right hand side upper rear of the cage in wheat. I also install covers across the section of cage above the concave otherwise I get straw build up around cage. We grow barley, lentils, and canola also and I get no build up at all from those crops.
 

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You want the thinnest layer of material going through the cage. You also want a little disruption in the separator end to shake loose any entrained grain. The cross bars in the separator grate do that in the newer machines. With the older machines without a grate a couple of F2 rasp bars positioned at about 8 and 4 of the belly of the separator end help to stir the material.
Also, a "hyperized" P1 with P3 stars in the separator end to give a high/low tumbling effect or a P3 rotor with every other row removed in the separator end.
Reverse bars impede the flow through the cage and cause the material to bunch up and the rotor tends to grind that plug which then causes more MOG on the shoe making it more difficult to get a clean sample.
 

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Also with a thin layer going through the cage the grain has a better chance of falling through the cage because there is less material for it to "hide". This is why a gentle "flipping" and "stirring" is more efficient than reverse bars and provides a cleaner sample.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The thin layer of material makes sense to me, probably would keep the P1 rotor for now and add the F2 bars. I've read most of the Gleaner Hyper Mods, but don't know how much applies to corn and soybeans and how much applies to wheat. I figured that some of these mods would work well in one crop and maybe not as well in another.
 

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The P1 with P3 stars in the separator end giving a high/low tumbling effect works very well with the F2 bars acting as a stirring device. The reason for the channel helical bars in the thresher is to get the material away faster to reduce over threshing and keep the MOG inside the cage reducing the load on the shoe. With channel, you have twice the gripping area to keep the MOG moving. Plus, with the steeper pitch, the MOG moves father each rotation.
The problem I found with the P1 was the rub bars that were not aggressive enough and would loose the grip on the crop. The rasp bars on the P3 rotor are more aggressive so they hold onto the crop better thus reducing the residence time in the cage and reduces the potential of the MOG getting ground up into small pieces causing more shoe load and eventually a dirty sample.
The key here is to thresh it and forget it!
 

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FYI - More residence time inside the cage does not guarantee getting all the grain out of the MOG. Good aggressive grain threshing grain at the concave, then quickly moving the MOG to the separator to be gently "stired, not shaken" to remove any entrained grain without breaking up the MOG is the key.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Pete, do you run P3 bars all the way across the rotor or just on the separator end? If one would go with a complete P3 rotor are any mods needed to make it work in the N6?
 

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Couple things to make a P3 work.
1) you need a 3/4" spacer behind the coupling to get the rotor centered. If you do not have that spacer in there the bars will rub on the gearbox wall. Also by extending the coupling you will have more output shaft splines inside the coupling to spread out the load on the coupling splines.
2) you will have to put the stop sign bearing on the inside. The P3 rotor shaft is shorter and will almost be flush with the the lock collar.
3) you will need to shim the speed sensor wheel and modify the pickup sensor.
Make sure you have a "Hyperized" P3 rotor with every other row removed in the separator end and in the blanks area a discharge paddle backing bracket in the mounting holes to help stir. I hard faced mine for longer life.
Also, you need extended cylinder bars into the discharge area on at least every other row. Make sure you have channel helical bars going into the discharge area. (see the pics on the hypermod site)
 

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Pics of the spacer and backing bracket. the space pictured is the first one I made and it was only 1/2" and was not quite enough so I added another 1/4 spacer. Plant


Grass Plant Metal


Auto part
 

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There are obvious little things that will be need addressed such as remount the coupling grease fitting and turning the bearing around in the pillow block bearing housing on the discharge end.
 

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I'm reading thru here as I'm thinking I'm going to have to do something with my r7 eventually. You can read about my experience in oats last week in another thread. Contemplating steep channel helicals, but are there standard pitch channels as well? I would get new bars from sunnybrook for my rotor-anyone know if the are wide spaced square bars available front them? I've had really good success with them in my L3 and would like to do the same with this thing if I can
 
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