The Combine Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a 1982 N6 with the Allis 670I engine. It is equipped with the American Bosch injection pump. It is running at about 2400 rpms high idle and works at 50 to 100 rpms lower. Should I turn the high idle up to factory specs of approx 2550 rpms? Is there a reason not to do this? I've always been told to leave the injection pump to professionals. Also the accelerator rolls are worn out. How big of a job is it to replace them? Will it make a significant difference? Thanks for any help!

Jim Schulte
Columbia, MO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Jim, hope you get some good answers /info on your N6 questions. I'm waiting now for a yes or no on my offer to purchase a 1985 N 6. I have no Gleaner experience so any info that gets posted for you will help me and others also. Seems to be some good experienced people here on this Forum so i'm sure you'll get some good answers.
Good luck with the new combine.
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
407 Posts
There's always a chance the tach is a bit off. I used to slow down the RPM's(to where you are now) on certain N-5 machines with four row corn heads and for guys who simply didn't want to drive full out in second gear (near 6 mph) all the time. Slowing down the shake of the shoe in corn and soybeans works quite well if you aren't pushing it to 100% capacity.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Some in our area turned RPM's down a small amount on N6's to help with engine life. I would not speed up if not necessary, 2500 screams. I have been told to change motor oil a little more often than book says also for engine benefit. Check shoe for cracks, bushings or holes wore in front of chaffer could do accelerator rolls from bottom if shoe is taken out I think. Have heard but not done rolls can be taken out side of combine and than new put on. Yes I would replace lugs on rolls. Maybe you will get more replies if planting slows down. dfb
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,232 Posts
accelator rolls will make a heck of a difference, they speed airflow up over shoe, they can be changed in machine, not a fun job, if you decide this route make sure machine is cleaned out, lay a sheet of plywood over sieves, close sieves first, gonna git alot of crap in your face, don't overtighen bolts or they will strip out, scott.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
You can change them either inside the machine like scott said or pull them out the side. That can get to be a big pain so if you just want to change the lugs Id do it inside the machine. It should only take a couple hours and a air ratchet really speeds things up. Bought a N7 a while back and the first time we went to change the lugs all the holes were stripped out. We ended up putting 3 or 4 inch bolts with nuts through since the holes line up. Might recommend a drop of blue loctite just to make sure the bolt doesnt come out if it is loose.

Matt
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
I replaced the Accel rolls last fall in my N6. I pulled the shafts out the right side. I had to torch off the bearings. Everything came apart tough. Next time, I'm going to lay on the sieves. I talked to the dealer and they replace them by laying down ply wood on the sieves. I have a craftman cordless impact. That baby works well in them type of jobs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
Gregorym, and others. Having never seen let alone replaced the rolls. can you tell me what they are made of and the approximate weight of each. What are the bolt sizes that tend to strip out easily? Are the N7 combine rolls the same? And lastly does the N7 have any bigger cleaning area? or sieve area?
Thanks for the info,
Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
164 Posts
Hi Dwight, The rolls are made out of rubber that bolt on to a square shaft. They are kinda of like a u shape with the bottom being flat. Abilene machine has a picture of them. The bolts I believe are 3/8". They each way maybe 5 lbs. I had a few bolts missing when I replaced them and I need to climb back in there this summer and see if the new bolts stayed in. I never thought about putting a bolt all the way thru and nutting it. That is a good idea if the threads are stripped. I used loctite also.
Try this web site for pictures.
http://www.abilenemachine.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
616 Posts
gregorym, thanks for the info. I also clicked the Abilenemachine site, appears they have quite a few Gleaner parts.
Thanks again for the info. Dwight E. Lambert, Albany, Oregon

Of course if I get that N6 it will never break during harvest and most likely never need a new part. HA!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
172 Posts
If the hole isn't too oblonged, just use 1 size larger self tapping shoulder bolt, the kind with a slight taper and a pie shaped notch at the end and grippers under the head. Drill to proper size if needed. I like a 3/8" butterfly air wrench best because you have better controll, Just make sure it is regulated down so you don't strip threads, I agree that loctite is a must. A clear full face shield is also a plus.

Good luck.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top