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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just picked up a 7120. Any tips or tricks a guy should know about. Any areas one should pay close attention to. I was reading on here about chopper bearings, any other problem spots. How fast should I be able to run in 50 bu wheat with a 36' header. Can't wait to get this machine in the field!!
 

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In wheat and other small grains the tailings processor doesn't really do anything other than circulate the returns around until they finally blow over the back or get into the grain tank. So if your tailings load is high, close up the top sieve and open the bottom sieve (and maybe reduce air a little bit). Threshing issues like whitecaps have to be handled in the rotor, not the sieves. Set your presieve to be open as wide as the grain you are harvesting only and never close it all the way either.

Conditions vary, so my speeds won't be your speeds. Just give it a try. I hear of some folks going over 100% engine load on the monitor, but I think that's a bad idea. Over 100% and shaft speeds start going slower than spec, so things don't work as well (shaker speed, etc). I often don't go over 90%.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks torriem. Tailings processor sounds like the old massey rethrashers. They were a joke !! Yeah I can't understand running over 100%. Would seem to make sense to run under 100% to have a little reserve power.
 

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Lol, threshing is always going to be your issue, and running under 100% powerload is likely not going to give you good threshing..

Chip it and run her as hard as u can or you will be in rotor loss area!
 

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Your machine basicly cleans with the top sieve. Nothing good comes from closing the bottom sieve.

Your machine basicly threshes with the rotor. Nothing good comes from high returns and trying to thresh with the rethresher.
 

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Yes the tailings processor is the same as the old Massey rethrasher. And just as effective. Case's rationale is that as combines got larger, the tailings would overload a rotor already loaded to 100%. Unfortunately I have not found the rethresher to actually rethresh (partially thrashed heads, for example). Perhaps it could be made to work if they redesigned it to have actual threshing elements in it somehow. John Deere has a little concave and little threshing elements in theirs.

As for stuffing the rotor, under some conditions, stuffing as much as you can into the rotor will improve rotor loss and improve threshing, because it increases grain on grain threshing. So sometimes you can just open the concaves a little and drive faster. But not always (driving faster is just one school of thought).

And more power isn't going to improve threshing in every situation. If so we'd all be driving 9120s or 9230s. We had virtually identical rotor losses with a 7010 as a 7230, which has quite a bit more horsepower. Perhaps in 8850jd's area, driving as fast as you can really does help. Just depends on conditions.
 

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Blow out air filter and alternator daily, cab filter is a joke...it could be blown out 10 times a day! Yes threshing should be done in the rotor. Cleaning system uses airflow more than shaking action and those machines work best when they are kept full, I run power-limit and set accordingly. Make sure cover plates are on rotor cage and under chopper. Only open pre-sieve enough to allow seeds through of the crop you are harvesting. Running more than 100% might slow down shaking action but the fan is hydraulic so it always stays bang on. I never had chopper bearing issues on 7010/7120's so I wouldn't be overly concerned on that. How fast you will go has less to do with bushels and more to do with straw IMO, these machines do not have a loss problem where you have to "drive by your loss monitor"........;)
 

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SWMan do the cover plates go on the concaves like the old machines. Where on the chopper does the cover plate go.
Cover plates go on some of the larger "corn holes" on each side of the cage. Chopper plate goes under the chopper to keep stuff from ejecting down and interfering with cleaning action. I actually have a spare set of rotor cage covers, if you were close by you could have them.;)
 

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Do NOT run this combine without chopper cover plate in small seeds like canola and flax, you'll be sorry. Make sure concaves are zerod and pinch point is at 6:00. Hard thresh in front for wheat is a good idea, must have for flax. Like others said its a wind cleaning machine, never run your bottom sieve further closed than top sieve by 1 or 2 mm, do the cleaning with top. Close the sieve, increase air.
 

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Found canola to be most challenging, keep rotor speed slow and use enough air to raise material off of sieves without losses, rear chopper cover could really help prevent trash from dropping to sieves

Found late at night to have best sample and lowest losses, from less trash dropping
 

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Before hitting the field it would be a good idea to go over the steel hydraulic lines on the left hand side of the machine, especially around where the hoses go up from the hydro block to the unload auger in/out ram (check these hoses for rubbing as well). On the last 7120 and now the 8120, the factory placement of zip ties on wiring ended up wearing through some of these lines. When a pinhole finally wears through it makes a huge oil/chaff coating on everything under the left side wall panels and makes changing the already awkward steel line an even more miserable job. These lines connect to a hydro block just in front of the batteries, run vertical up a foot or so, then take a 90degree turn and run horizontal up towards the cab. You might need to grind down the open end of a wrench (think it's a 15/16) to be able to take the lines off the block as there is very little room to access some of the connections. I move all the zip ties and wiring looms that touch or come close to the steel lines and use your hand to feel for rubbing on the backside of the line. You might find nothing or you might save you self a lot of dirty down time in the field. Its amazing how the plastic shows no sign of wear yet the steel line is wore through!
 

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Good tip bigtimeoperator.
Same as buzzard and nicemustang it is a must to have chopper cover on. Ran my first year without one as no dealers in oz mentioned them or thought necessary. Then stumbled apon a Canadian caseih video setup utube telling how to put covers in as holes only for high yielding corn. In small seed like canola the chopper blows wind through these holes down and backwards against the sieves wind. My 2nd year capacity was way more just from putting cover plates on. Good luck with ur new toy
 
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