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Yes there is a 9240, what about a 10240, class 10 like New Holland.
On the 9240 is the grain bin still 350 bu?
 

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Your probably right that Case IH won't get into the class 10 market until the cleaning system undergoes a major overhaul and maybe even a complete redesign.
 

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Maybe for corn, but for small grains the cleaning system is already large enough to work fine, though I'd like to see a longer sieve. When people complain about losses, 90% of the time they are rotor losses, not sieve losses. The real limiting factor is the rotor itself. You can't just scale it up with only horsepower, at least in small grains. The only solution I can see is to move to two rotors.
 

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I would guess the st. Johns rotor mod would do the trick...

The sweet spot on the new rotors is constantly moving because it doesn't handle changing conditions at all.. It needs max grain in perfect going or it is screwed and the settings don't work..
 

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Yes there is a 9240, what about a 10240, class 10 like New Holland.
On the 9240 is the grain bin still 350 bu?
New Holland typically gets to launch first:


  • NH's new CR was introduced in 2002 with the CIH AFX 8010 following one year later ('03)

  • NH intro'd the 9090 ahead of the 9120

  • NH got the new CNH flex draper first (pre-production in 2012 for MY2013 sales), while CIH got it one year later (pre-production in 2013 for MY2014 sales)

  • NH is introducing the first CNH class 10 (CR 10.90) this year as pre-production for MY2015 release, CIH will most likely have it in pre-production next year for MY2016 release

  • NH has a much larger global presence in combine harvesters, generating far more revenue and profit than CIH combines.
 

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It's going to take more than just changing the cleaning system. The rotor has been maxed out since the 8010 came out.
Then why has there been HP improvements, cage improvements, cleaning system improvements?

That little rotor can do over 6k an hour in corn. I bet CNH has had is closer to 7.5k in good corn. Dry corn hard to do with wet corn.

I am sure they are getting closer to maxing the rotor out. It probably is for small grains but I doubt it for corn.
 

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Then why has there been HP improvements, cage improvements, cleaning system improvements?

That little rotor can do over 6k an hour in corn. I bet CNH has had is closer to 7.5k in good corn. Dry corn hard to do with wet corn.

I am sure they are getting closer to maxing the rotor out. It probably is for small grains but I doubt it for corn.
It's limited to about 3,500 bu/hr @ 2% grain loss @ 180 bu/ac corn, which is 3.6 bu/ac loss. The CIH rotor and rotor cage physically does not have enough open area, or potential open area with the current cage design to to support anymore throughput.
 

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I sure don't see the rotor have much loses on small grains on our machines, and seives when set correctly do a good job overall, not over thrashing and chocking the cleaning system is the tricky part
 

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As they say, conditions vary. So some people very well could get 6000 bu/hr out of it.

Except for Gleaners, all combines are corn combines. That and soybeans. The ability to do small grains is secondary to most manufacturers. To me that's the problem with the horsepower race. It just doesn't buy anything for crops like wheat. In my conditions, heavy straw on irrigation, a class 7 machine is about ideal. We had a 7010 and loved it, and wrongly thought moving to a 8120 would give us even more capacity. We were wrong! In wheat, the 8120 had about the same capacity as the 7010, but burned a lot more fuel. So we now run a 7230 and a 7120.
 

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I sure don't see the rotor have much loses on small grains on our machines, and seives when set correctly do a good job overall, not over thrashing and chocking the cleaning system is the tricky part
I assume you've held a catch pan up to the straw door and verified that it wasn't rotor loss? 90% of our losses are rotor loss in most crops and conditions. This is measured with a catch pan with the chaff spreading and straw dropping. I've seen this on standard rotors and also small tube rotors.
 

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Keep in mind we don't grow irrigation yields and don't carry the heavy straw load and also cut as high as possible, lot less material for the combine to separate...

We do kill stalls, and seed counts in general, and after that monitor can be fairly accurate to your likings, it's usually the sieves that is prone to jumping if any
 

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As they say, conditions vary. So some people very well could get 6000 bu/hr out of it.

Except for Gleaners, all combines are corn combines. That and soybeans. The ability to do small grains is secondary to most manufacturers. To me that's the problem with the horsepower race. It just doesn't buy anything for crops like wheat. In my conditions, heavy straw on irrigation, a class 7 machine is about ideal. We had a 7010 and loved it, and wrongly thought moving to a 8120 would give us even more capacity. We were wrong! In wheat, the 8120 had about the same capacity as the 7010, but burned a lot more fuel. So we now run a 7230 and a 7120.
Believe it or not,but there are areas in this world,where nothing but hp is needed to get some capacity out of a single rotor combine in small grains.People in the high yielding areas(140bu+) close to the shores of the north atlantic ocean or the baltic sea put chips in 600hp+ combines to keep em going in the evening when it gets tough...
 
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