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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I presently run a 2388 Case IH but am considering purchasing a CR9070. What options should a guy consider? Which are a must have? Which are "It would be nice but not a deal breaker" ? Can't find a site that lists the options so don't know what is and isn't available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
The combine we are presently looking at has alot of the options that you mention. One option listed is a "fan bottom shield for self leveling shoe"??? Sometimes those "little things" sure make it a much nicer machine but some are a total waste of money. As I don't know what is and isn't available or worthwhile, I appreciate the input. Talked to 1 farmer that said how nice his onboard air compressor was and told me he only blew his rad out once all season. I blow the dust and chaff off of my machine every day but am wondering if it wouldn't be a nicer and safer job if the engine wasn't running.
 

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It is pretty important to have the large touch screen, very easy to navigate with vs. the small one. I think they all come with self leveling shoe, yield and moisture, 2 speed rotors, header tilt, I would not worry about variable speed feeder house, or deluxe cab. Duals are nice esp with a big header and a full grain tank (not a deal breaker) Auto steer?? mapping?? long auger - Yes. fine cut chopper (very good)
 

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CR970, now you have to change your name.

I don't think trailing rub bars are necessary. We thresh some pretty hard threshing durum without them. I don't know what else might need them. They just suck power and reduce capacity slightly. Field Pea concaves would be nice (and are evidence that NH actually listens to customers sometimes!)
 

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In my limited harvest experience with durum I would guess the hardest threshing durum would still
be easier to thresh than the easiest threshing red spring.
So hard threshing red spring would be the what else.

If NH would stop jacking around with max rotor speeds and keep tip speeds up then maybe not.

Don
 

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Baked in strongfield durum is the hardest stuff to thresh way harder than any red spring wheat we ever grew. I agree they should just jack the rotor speed up and it does a better job our TR98 will run at 1779rpm. I wish our 9060 would go that fast it tops out at 1650 rpm.
 

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We just purchused a 2009 9070 with 182 hours. It has a lot more options than we needed but the price was right. Some of the options are intelliview plus 2 monitor,field pea special concaves(for small grains and hard to thrash crops)(in abrasive wear configuration),wire grate cover,air compressor,trailing rub bars, deluxe residue chopper,adjustable top cover(allows you to change the pitch of transport vane). Way too many options!! We do only have 900 singles on this combine,we had duals on our last one.
 

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We got our first TR 70 in 1978, (just 6 years before you were born Andy
) we grew Park rsw.
Went to help a neighbor, he grew Neepawa.
Those two wheats were opposite ends of the threshing spectrum.
I loosened the jam nuts on the electric adjusting screw and set the belt so it was right on
the outside edge of the drive pulley, raising it to 1760 rpm no load, if memory serves.
New Holland had changed the sheaves realizing the need for more rotor speed by 1978.
Far cleaner sample and greatly reduced threshing losses.
When PAMI tested the TR 70 in 1977 the initial max rotor speed was 1140!

http://www1.agric.gov.ab.ca/$department/deptdocs.nsf/all/eng7932/$FILE/53.pdf

Don
 

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Baked in Strongfield was what I was thinking, lentilgrower. Takes its time coming out, thats for sure. Rotor speed would be the ticket. They at least are moving in that direction.
 

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Not really sure why you would need a redekop chopper. The two new hollands that we have ran both had 36 foot headers and had no trouble spreading that far. Can also turn the straw to dust if pull knives tight.
 

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Everyone in area run 42' honeybee drapers and local dealership puts redekop choppers on nearly 100% of the combines they sell. Like I said, don't run New Holland, but there has to be a d**n good reason everyone in area wants one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Which would you guys buy- new CR9070 or a 120 hour CR9080 with about $6000 less options- both about the same price?
 

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Wade, don't know where you are at, but FWIW, here in the western corn belt with all of the rain this fall, there is a lot of late model and even new machines going on the auction block after a harvest from he**. I know of some custom guys getting rid of what were new machines at start of harvest due to the beating they got getting this crop out. Everybody seems to have a horror story of getting equipment out of mud this fall. My .02c.

Good luck with your decision, our next one will be NH as well. Tired of AGCO jerking us around.
 

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The Cr combines have mav choppers in them any way the rotor in the chopper is made by redekop for them. The only advantages to put a after market mav on would be that it would spread the chaff with the straw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I live in Alberta. The hours on the machine were from the dealer demos. I assume trying to break the predominant red/green market. Mostly mechanic driven.
 

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Just a comment for wade on 9080 vs 9070. I bought a 9080 last year and find it very impressive to run. The torque reserve is incredible. The faster rotor speed really helps save grain and with the hydraulic fan, we find it hard to throw over compared to 970 we had. I would say we are doing about realistically 50% more than 970. My shortfall would be header width as 35 feet is not enough to fill combine. I probably should have a 42 foot header for small grain. 30 foot in canola swath is still alright as I think they dry out better than 35 foot swathers. Most of the time 1600-1800 bu per hour in hrs wheat with lots of reserve. I have a picture of over 2000 bu per hr with about 70% load. Fuel is very good, .9 gal per acre which was better than the 970 with much more work being done. I find the 9080 so simple to set and very forgiving from dry to damp. In damp conditions 9080 really stands out.
 

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Just curious, if you're currently running a 2388, what's the need to jump from and old class 6, to a new class 8 or 9? Wouldn't a logical step be a new class 6 like a 9040 or even a class 7 like a 9060? Just curious. Did you pick up a large number of acres, or just getting a great deal on an oversized machine?
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
-With the 2388 we were under capacity for our acres so we were looking to go up a class.
-Hope to expand our acreage.
-Selection wasn't as good for a 9060.
-Seemed like New Holland really wanted to get our business.
 
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