The Combine Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I think Claas could put the APS and Cylinder in the feeder house and then shorten the entire machine by what 6'. Just think how easy it could be to access the whole thing! top, bottom, sides. Big issue's, just hook it to your tractor 3pt. and have it all right there. Maybe do what they did in the past, put the Engine right behind the cab,or under it, all the power right where its used. Hugh grain tank that could be lower. and a nice short wheelbase.
What's everybody think?? TIME TO THINK OUTSIDE OF THE BOX!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,315 Posts
There is a reason why they moved the engine to the back. If you ever ran a machine with a front mount motor you would know why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,450 Posts
They would have to make the feeder house so big and beefy you wouldn't just hook it to the tractor to remove. Especially with the weight up high and far out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
There is some merit in your idea but Gleaner had the cylinder more forward and no feeder chain and lost the positive control of the flow of material entering the threshing cylinder by the feeder chain. Way more slugging in windrows. The other thing is how do you get the grain and mog from under the concave and APS back to the cascade and airblast leading to the chaffer. Raddle chains??? which were no joy either. You win some, you lose some things. Personally, farming in a small grains, high straw area, I was overjoyed to see Lexion build a combine that was MUCH longer than a corn sheller!! In your area your wish list might be totally different though!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,686 Posts
There was a combine in the 70s or 80s in Europe that had the entire cylinder in the feederhouse area. It would discharge straw just in front of the front wheels. I saw a youtube video of it running not so long ago. I'll post a link if I can find it. Not sure how they got the threshed grain up into the cleaning sieves. Augers I suppose.

I used to think most canola threshing was done in the feederhouse. But that was before modern canola varieties that need nearly wheat rotor settings to get the pods to split open.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top