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Should tyvek or other housewrap be put on before the exterior metal on a pole shed that will be insulated with big bats of fiberglass and heated?

They do it on every home, but pole builders say no body does it. Could also be saying that as it would be much slower for them to finish the building.

With the good LED lights today and mostly winter work inside, are many windows needed? Was thinking that probably 2 or 3 windows in a 40x100 shop would be all that I need. Put 2 on the south wall (40') and 1 in the north east corner of the 100' wall. Shop will be mainly used for maintenance and combine inspections. No real construction projects.
 

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I only put two windows in my shop. Cheap to heat and stays cool in the summer. If I want light, I flip a switch.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I only put two windows in my shop. Cheap to heat and stays cool in the summer. If I want light, I flip a switch.
Which side do your windows face? Thinking that West windows would let in too much heat?
 

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I would put tyvek on. It is one more barrier to prevent wind and water from getting into the building. It is cheap enough and not hard to put on. Contractors never seem to want to do anything extra and often have more excuses why they can not do something. I would really pay attention to how they install the batts. Hopefully there will be no air space or gaps between the batts
 

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I would put the tyvek over the strapping, assuming the strapping is 2x4 I’d be tempted to add 1.5” foam between the strapping and tyvek over It.
 

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I agree put on the Tyvek.
If nothing else it will help seal the air drafts.
It made a big improvement on the house, we added rigid foam insulation and Tyvek to dads 1970s 2x4 walls.
 

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I would put tyvek on. It is one more barrier to prevent wind and water from getting into the building. It is cheap enough and not hard to put on. Contractors never seem to want to do anything extra and often have more excuses why they can not do something. I would really pay attention to how they install the batts. Hopefully there will be no air space or gaps between the batts
I think a proper insulating job is one of the most important jobs that often gets overlooked. Contractors hate it as it is a bad job, but I would be tempted to do that myself. Like previously said no gaps, no extra compression, absolutely no gaps between vapor barrier and insulation. Of all the buildings I've built over the years I did a turn key on one of them which was a a barn. Now I'm redoing the interior and even with my babysitting (back in the day) the insulation job was not good and I know why there were wet spots. A shop won't have humidity like a barn but insulation needs to be done properly. My rant.
 
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