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I looked at this cart today. I liked the electric drives and sectional control. In fact there wasn't really that much I didn't like about it. It will be interesting to see how many of these hit the field in 2016.
 

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The cart looked good. I hope the price is reasonable. When they go from the 760 to 950 bushel size they do not increase the middle tank size of 170 bushels which I thought was odd. If you are seeding wheat the bigger size will not gain you much for capacity because the next larger tank on the 950 is 325 bushel. It would have been better if they would have increased all three tank sizes. I with they would put a simple fill tube from the top to fill the canola tank with using the conveyor. It would save a lot of cost over the more complicated pneumatic fill.
 

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It is a 4 tank design with the 4th tank being about 30 bushels and is filled at ground level with a pnematic fill. This tank has a access door at the side and looks like it might be a little bit of a chore to seed the last bag or two out of. It would be very difficult to pour a bag on the empty part of the meter roll because the pneumatic fill supposedly spreads it evenly accross the width of the roll. The Bourgault design of being off to the side is a lot more accessible.
 

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There is no more down draft metering. One blower in the back feeds the top tubes straight on and the other blower supplies the bottom tubes. The product drops into the tube and is blown to the drill. You can put product from any tank into any stream. They presurize the tanks with a small line with a ball valve on it to control it. They use the same meter roll for all crops. It resembles the super coarse roll.
 

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Don, I asked the Morris guys this question about there set up. If you shut the seed off thats going to mean less resistance to flow in those lines, So wouldn't that mean that the air from the fan is going to take the path of least resistance, and cause plugging issues in the runs that still have seed going threw them?

So I as I understand the flex coil system uses individual metering motors for each primary run, and morris uses a gear to shut off and turn on the metering, the disruption to the air and seed flow should be much the same. The morris guys told me that it isn't a problem, because of the back pressure caused by the openers being in the ground. And the air resistance from the hoses and manifolds. So perhaps its not as big of issue as it would seem? Or perhaps there was a flexi coil engineer eves dropping on our conversation and the morris guy was wanting to throw flexi coil for a loop?

One thing that I forgot to ask about was if the Dutch seed breaks would change that. Since they are exhausting air to slow the seed as it falls to the ground, perhaps thats going to cause an issue?
 

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That doesn't exact answer my question but that's ok, I'd likely have to see the setup.
How do they prevent "stepping" of low rate/very low rpm canola seed with a meter course enough for Faba?
Angled flutes ah la Morris?
Something else?
 

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No pictures? I haven't seen the cart yet, I assume it will be at Ag Days in Manitoba. However it sounds a lot like the meters on the new Seedhawk tank.
X2, I can't believe you guys aren't posting pictures.....it would save you typing a thousand words you know.;)
 

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Don, I asked the Morris guys this question about there set up. If you shut the seed off thats going to mean less resistance to flow in those lines, So wouldn't that mean that the air from the fan is going to take the path of least resistance, and cause plugging issues in the runs that still have seed going threw them?

So I as I understand the flex coil system uses individual metering motors for each primary run, and morris uses a gear to shut off and turn on the metering, the disruption to the air and seed flow should be much the same. The morris guys told me that it isn't a problem, because of the back pressure caused by the openers being in the ground. And the air resistance from the hoses and manifolds. So perhaps its not as big of issue as it would seem? Or perhaps there was a flexi coil engineer eves dropping on our conversation and the morris guy was wanting to throw flexi coil for a loop?

One thing that I forgot to ask about was if the Dutch seed breaks would change that. Since they are exhausting air to slow the seed as it falls to the ground, perhaps thats going to cause an issue?
Short answer to all your points is yes.
Mostly.
However, I don't buy the openers in the ground line.
Also not sure line resistance alone is enough, in fact at high rates and/or speeds I'm sure it's not.
I'm also not sure what the new Dutch brake effect is.
Maybe very little.:confused:

Nothing that won't get ironed out.
In about 5 years!:rolleyes:
 

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Alright here it is! Props to scotsburn for sending me this, hopefully we can look at it next week at Ag-Days.:cool:
 

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