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The extra expense for a gin is for modifications to their module feeder. Normally a rectangular module sits on a roller conveyor as it's fed into the ginning system, but I guess that doesn't work as well with round modules. I'm really not sure what exactly need to be modified or added; like I said above I'm from stripper cotton country so I've never seen a gin that would deal with round modules from Deere's picker.

edit: It seems I've been beaten to the punch. I think part of what I said is right, but... I dunno. That is cool about the RFID tags. I never thought about how anyone was going to keep track of all those little bales.
 

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Riceman it's nice to hear that ya'll have your share of crackheads and meth-addicts up your way too. That point really sums up the whole story about these new pickers and I just wanted to add a little to that so other guys reading this knew the background a little better. Farmers in the south who deal with cotton have had to have a lot more labor than a similar sized farm in grain country. Cotton used to require a lot of cultivation and spraying and most of that has been eliminated with reduced tillage systems, roundup ready, bt, bigger planting equipment, etc. But we still needed a lot of manpower at harvest to operate module builders and boll buggies. As we all know, the term "good part time help" is an oxymoron. Therefore so much interest in these pickers. We finally have all the pieces of the puzzle where you could take 2 or 3 good men and farm several thousand acres similar to a midwest corn/bean farm.
 

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Oh yeah, we got plenty of them. They aren't real good a fixing anything but are d**n good at tearing stuff up. The average age of a "good" farm laborer here is 55-65. None of the younger ones want to work and the older ones are dying out.

I think on average it takes 4-5 guys per picker to run it. One to drive it, one to run the builder, one to run the buggy, and one or 2 cleaning up the ground and tarping. If these building pickers only took one or two guys...its a lot easier to drive it yourself or find a real good guy to sit in the seat rather than finding 5 guys. Run 3 or 4 pickers and that adds up to a lot of extra labor quick.
 

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I'm glad to hear that.

What do you know about the new flex draper from Deere? I've asked on that thread but didn't get much of a responce. Will that head bea adaptable to other brands like Macdon and Honeybee's with their adapter or will it take a Bish adapter to change it over? You might be shocked to hear this but I really like the way that head is made and how it operates. I watched one this fall a few times and it looks like it would work perfect for us. Right now I'm running a 35 foot flex but would love to go to a 40' flex draper. I'm not real impressed with the Macdon flex. Don't want to get into a pissing match with any Macdon fans on that issue either though..
 

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As Homer Simpson would say,
L e m o n f l a v o u r m a r s h m o l l o w
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAH!

Don

Thanks Don, lol
You bring up Homer Simpson many times.

No Red or Green war, only showing that it is better to handle round bales, move them, load, haul, store and anything else.
 

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I am surprised that some one hasn't made a trailor or something to haul multiple round bales or moudles like the big square bale accumulators, so you can keep going until the end of the filed and off load four or more of them at once.
 

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Since there have been cotton pickers there have been arguments about wich one picks cleanest. In truth, there's no difference if they're set properly and have good spindles, doffers, etc. Probably the best answer to your question is that the pictures and videos you've seen of the red one were in better picking cotton than the other. Different varieities pick cleaner than others. It can also vary a lot depending on if it has been rained on since the bolls have opened. Big fluffy bolls that haven't been rained on pick almost 100% clean. Small, hard-locked bolls that have been through some weather, not so much.
 

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Excuse my ignorance, but I know very little about cotton pickers. Now not to be biased even though i'm not a huge fan of the galloping goat, but in most photos or videos I have seen, a CIH picks a lot cleaner than a JD. Is this operator, machine set-up or is there something differnet in the picking head as somone mentioned in an earlier post. Any constructive feedback would be great
 

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If its hard to get cotton workers and you pick cotton when they pick in Texas, you guys should be trying to get Canadian farmers to come on down. Some will be retired and just are down south to escape the cold. They wouldn't need much pay, just an excuse to get out of the trailer watching the dish with the wife. And a bunch of us younger guys (that means you too Don) don't like cold either!
 

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The idea, Sam, is that large operators will be able to run these pickers and not have to have boll buggies, module builders, and all the associated tractors and help to run it all. This reduces their overhead and allows them to save money in the long run. I can see this being a big thing in the west once they get all the bugs worked out.
 
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