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Well I wish I could afford what everyone has on their wish list. If I waited til I could, the list would have changed and still couldn't afford it lol. I want a place big enough to hold 3 pieces of machinery. A tractor or 2 and a combine with room to walk around and room for benchs welder etc. Floor heat is a must. A separate room for your compressor is a big one. A guy who owned a automotive garage in town yrs ago had his compressor in the basement of the office part. It made for an environment you could talk easily in regardless of what was going on. Have retractable 1/2" airlines on all walls and 110v retractable cords. Makes sweeping and cleanup a breeze. Rolling benchs are a must for me. Good lighting is a must. Windows will help greatly with light from the side but wall lights half way down or lower are key. It seems you can have all the lights in the world up above but lift a hood or crawl under something from the side and it is dark. My shop I want a wall mounted electric pressure washer with a retractable hose reel. I don't need a separate wash bay with floor heat. I don't use natural gas or propane so leaving a door open in winter a few minutes to exchange the air after washing stuff is just what I do already in my house garage. Round bales in a boiler heat my yard so heating is the cost of running a small electric pump to circulate the water and a bale every 36 hrs currently. I hope with a shop added I can get 24 hrs and a cleaner burn. A bathroom will be in order and my office will be small. Enough room for a computer and a big dry erase board microwave and tables and chairs. A big calendar with naked chicks to keep the wife away on my beer fridge, which will hold a bottle of captain spiced and some mix.
 

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Floor drain is a must if it's going to be heated and used in the winter. If you use a loader tractor or snowblower they carry in quite a bit of water. In the winter when the shop is full of stuff you won't make it far in the door so make sure the drain is there or that the water can run to the drain. One of those things that's hard to add later. Once you have in floor heat it would be hard to go back.

Overhead lights are great till you get a combine in there. Need some lower down in your main work area. Make sure it is tall enough to Get the combine in there.

Need some long sections of bench. Stationary and rolling is nice too but it seems like when the shop fills up the rolling ones tend to become stationary. Small rolling carts work nice too. The house got different cabinets so the old ones got set up in the shop.

Put some thought into the electrical outlet layout. Ours is in conduit on the outside of the tin. Going to have a fridge and freezer? They will take up/cover up outlets. Old Washing machine? etc. Outlet boxes with 4 plugs helps quite a bit. Stick welder, mig welder, tig welder, plasma cutter, air compressor? Need outlets. We have by the main door and all the way to midway down the shop. They all get used.

Retractable cords and built in air line would be nice but can be put it later if you find it necessary. Personally, haven't done it yet. It could be the bees knees and I'm living in ignorance.

Speakers and old receiver are nice for listening to the radio/podcasts/ipod.

Just put in a threaded pvc sleeve through the wall under the air hose reel. Now we don't have to open doors to get the air hose out. Liked it so much we put another by the other door. Work great for extension cords etc.
 

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Need some long sections of bench.
The problem with long work benches is that they tend to just carry more junk. The more flat surfaces you have, the more tools and "stuff" that you will likely have that doesn't get put away. Doesn't apply to everyone of course. Some people are just anal about putting stuff away but others, not so much and the more bench space you have, the more "random storage" it becomes.
Put some thought into the electrical outlet layout. Ours is in conduit on the outside of the tin.
The ONLY way to go IMO. My electrical is in the walls but if I had built the shop, there is no way I would put it in the walls. Conduit on the surface is the way to go. SO easy to add/change afterwards and, no matter how well you plan out your shop, you WILL want to change things around down the road as your operation/hobbies etc evolve. Regarding in floor heat, I put in floor in my garage at my last place and liked it but have radiant in my shop now and prefer it over the in floor. In floor is nice if you rarely if ever open the big door in the winter, like for a woodworking shop but for a show that will see equipment come and go, radiant is preferable for me. Ideally, I would have both.
 

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Once you get a few hundred miles on carbides I find they don’t actually cut concrete anymore (not mine anyways). They make scratches but if you run your finger over they aren’t actually grooves. I do have a couple of these dollies tho and they work great, drive on and off them.
I made one of those out of some square tubing. Just need a 14" piece at the back and two platforms with rollers for the skis and you're set. Make sure it's long enough to engage the track before the skis hit. I'll try get a pic later. They are really nice for sleds without reverse.
 

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Have been playing with idea of building a bigger shop at some point but from what I can gather any sort of over head basically needs to be on its own frame to meet code (or else the frame of the building made out of steel engineered for the structure to withstand weight being put on it.......) (unless you happen to be in a municipality that doesn't have a building inspector). I'm thinking that if building to code a used forklift likely way cheaper than all the additions needed for a crane.
Yea those overhead bridge cranes add a lot of loads to the building, it needs to be a steel building designed for the crane, with heavier columns and rafters, crane brackets, more bracing, bigger piles... or on its own steel structure. Agreed that forklift or LTK's suggestion to get a picker truck would be more economical. Bridge cranes are expensive.

Winches can be done in a wood building, just make sure you tell the builder so they can double or triple up the trusses. A small monorail crane might work too in a wood building.

Someone mentioned lighting low on the walls, that's a good one, as well as air reels. Don't cheap out on overhead doors. Be liberal with plugs and welding plugs. Some ceiling fans are good to have regardless of how you heat the building.
 

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A bar fridge and stripper pole could come in handy.


As for moving sleds around in our shop, we built a heavy duty engine hoist a few years ago to pull the transmission out of our 895 Versy. It has an extra long reach so we pull the sled up to the door, the crane is long enough to reach out the door to hook to either the sleds bumper or put a pipe through the ski hoops and lift up the front end. You can then either drive the sled in and the crane rolls along or pull it in as it rolls easy. Those cheap dollies for sleds are a waste of money, the floor needs to be swept cleaner than operating room table to work.
 

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This shop was built in 2014 for a road building /gravel/ excavation company. I was surprised to see a pit on the plans as I too thought they didn’t meet OHS regulations. But as has been stated already, it has an exhaust system and alarms. These pictures were taken as the crane company was installing the crane. The wash bay is separated from the main shop by a wall. Wash bay has lower lights as well as translucent windows in the doors. Main shop has udrain but wash bay has a wider gutter so they can muck it out with a mini hoe. Mechanical room is off the side with screw type air compressor in it. They have a parts room, washrooms,lunch rooms and offices off the other side. Everything on one level. Oh, and in floor heat. They designed what they needed and may not be a fit for everyone, but just some ideas for you.
 

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For me the most important thing is just more space. If I can take everything that I have currently and put it in a building with 3x the space I’d be happy. There is a long list of things that would be nice to have but worthless without room. I find it sad that there are many shops built that end up being climate controlled storage buildings with very little work being done in them
 

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With a wash bay a guy needs to decide how much you will use it. I worked at a place with one that was not separate from the rest, it was always smelly and the tools were even rusty, but it was used alot. Also it was used for semi trucks and trailers and it did not have fire hoses and with just the wands not enough water flowed to keep the sump clean, they were always digging it out. A sloped pad outside would work for me then a guy can scrape the crap off with a loader, but its not a winter thing then.
How times have changed 20 years ago it was hard to justify a $3000 mover fo a auger, now guys think your crazy for not putting a $300000 wash bay on your shop. Decide where your priorities are, some people would use a wash bay way more than a shop, some would much rather spend the money shop space, and lets not judge each other on our choices.
Also don't put your sump where the weels will be running on top of it all the time. Crossing is fine but you dont want to drive up it, i have seen many of grates flip up and front tires fall in.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Thanks guys for all your input! obviously there isn't a one way fits all. would make things simpler if it could be! lol I can't imagine a seperate wash bay would be worth it in our case. It would be nice but not worth the extra money! I was hoping to have a pad to wash outside when the weather is nice and curtains of some sort inside when its cold. Would need good ventilation and was wondering if could hook up an hrv system or something to keep it dry in the shop or is a shop too big of an area?
also those pictures of that stand alone crane is something I never thought about! Could get away with a wood frame building and put pilings in to support that crane and could add that anytime in the future!
 

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I built a 48x80x16 shop (small by most standards) and segregated a 24x40 wash bay in the corner, and it has been one of the best features of the shop. It's accessible to the main shop via a 20x16 overhead door, yet has another 20x16 overhead door to the outside. It has its own ventilation system so all the washing, fabrication welding and painting can be done there without affecting the rest of the shop. Its well worth considering.
 

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Don't cheap out on the concrete quality. You may not need it for strength, but you need it for the extra life it gives the floor finish. 4500 psi minimum, 5,000 psi is better.
 

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Bent it seems that concrete over 31-3300 psi guys do not want to pour around here because it sets up to fast. I have never heard of someone using 4500-5000 psi. That should be quite strong.
 

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Bent it seems that concrete over 31-3300 psi guys do not want to pour around here because it sets up to fast. I have never heard of someone using 4500-5000 psi. That should be quite strong.
I put 50mpa concrete in my shop. What is that psi? I'm not concrete literate.
 
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