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well with all the rain out here in central sask again gonna be lots of disease pressure on the crops, we (my dad and i ) have never sprayed fungicides before but really want to give it a try this year after reading about all the benefits from it on websites such as this and in marketing ads, we want to do some on hrsw and this year for the first time i grew some soft red wheat (cant remember exact vareity).. maybe even spray some flax to

i have this Quality meets quantity hand out book from bayer cropscience that is all about their tests on fungicides, they say that prosaro at heading is the best bang for your buck , but after doing some research seems like most guys are spraying at flag leaf stag? any thoughts?

going to leave out a few strips to see just how effective this stuff really is...
also with the soft red wheat buddy i got the seed from said it most likely gets sold as feed wheat so would that change any fungicide timing as grade is not as important,its all about the bushels....

im just the young guy getting in on the farm so all this plant bioligy really gets me excited, things have been changing with fertilizer rates and now fungicides since ive started farming as "the old dog" just hasnt kept up with the times haha but he agress that we should start using fungicides. nobody around us does any except for add some in with their herbicides so i guess ill be giving the neigbours something to talk about this summer when i head out spraying...
 

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There's people out there that don't spray for fusarium on their wheat these days? Hmm, had no idea! Thought that was standard practice.

If you are looking for quality and bushels, the best bang for buck is treatment at heading around first flowering. You'll have to research best practices, bayer's website is very good for that. Somewhere along the line of head emergence and 50% flowering is best but does matter on each variety a bit on how it matures. Protecting the flag leaf sometimes is good too, but I have found it's hit and miss. Also I don't want to be out in sprayer all summer (I have a family) but we do know that spraying for FHB does wonders. Spraying on flag is a very good choice on barley and oats though, no FHB grading issues there. For flag leaf twinline and quilt are very good, I suggest using the one where you get the best rebate back if using basf or Syngenta products. For FHB, caramba or prosaro is way to go, again use what you get the best price on. I don't think one is better than another in this area, all four of these are great products. Don't get talked into a cheap one though like tilt or folicur, you won't be as happy. If you're going to spend the time and money on something, use the better ones IMO. Definitely leave a check stripe in every field or variety so you can see the benefits of your investment. I would do flag leaf spraying if you are growing something for the feed market.

You're probably late in game to get any proline, but it is the best for canola. Sells out very quickly. I've tried some others and I like astound but annoying that's powder. But proline is very good, actually if you could afford to put that on wheat you'd be far ahead too (prosaro is proline + folicur).

I will not grow a flax crop without spraying headline mid flowering. It's just not worth it in our area. First two years I did it the check strip was 10-15 bushels better. I don't leave check strips anymore.

Last two years we have been 80-90% coverage in fungicides. Years before that it was just cereals and some oils. Quality and bushels have gone up. I think I will always do the cereals as it just easily pays, canola can be hit and miss but is a good insurance policy. I am planning on doing farm wide this year, already have it all sitting in shed.
 

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Folicur vs. Prosaro

Several years ago I got re-introduced to scab and FHB. Been a number of years since I'd had FHB in central SD, ended up getting hit and having quality and quantity problems from disease. Next go around, place that did my spraying said they could protect the wheat from damage, and it wouldn't cost that much either. They used folicur. It didn't work. that winter wheat was damaged with FHB.

Next step, I finally jumped in and researched treatments, and found Prosaro appeared much more successful in protecting from FHB. Had the spring wheat sprayed with Prosaro, it was successfully protected. Similar conditions, wet weather during flowering. Not a scientific comparison, but enough similarities in weather during flowering for both crops to influence me.

I'd gone back to ag place I was using, Wilbur Ellis, and tried to get some relief. I was disappointed the guy who told me they could protect the wheat easy and pretty cheap didn't present choices. It seemed to get worse as I went up the chain of command. I dealt with the new manager to talk through this, he and his associate initially claimed folicur and Prosaro were the same thing, that folicur was the "generic" version. By then, I'd learned enough to know that was wrong. Whole thing was tedious. Obvious from the word "Go" they were more interested in denying any compensation than talking through things. Their final say was that the two chemicals work exactly the same, no difference in performance, only thing that would influence performance would be timing of application. That helped me detour to North Central Farmers Elevator for chemicals and application, and things have gone much better.

Same company (Wilbur Ellis), different manager, drifted RoundUp on me last year, spraying neighbor's soybeans and injuring my spring wheat. Turns out they insure themselves in-house, don't use an insurance company. This time, they claimed the wind was blowing away from my crop, not towards it, when they sprayed. Even having plants analyzed and evidencing glysophate didn't budge them. Next time, I'll know to line my ducks up better and fight harder.

I think there is a very significant difference in performance between folicur and Prosaro. If I were offered a free application and free chemical of folicur, I would pass and pay for chemical and application of Prosaro. Just my opinion.

I think the timing disparity you mentioned, flag leaf vs. heading/flowering, addresses different diseases. I do flag leaf application of different fungicide to protect for tan spot and other fungal diseases. Another application at early flowering specifically protects from FHB, the Prosaro application. Different timings are for different diseases, I do both when there is significant rain and dew like this year in central South Dakota.
 

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nicemustang,
We've sprayed only Folicur for a while now and there's a definite yield benefit between that and applying nothing. Have you seen a definite yield bump between Folicur versus Prosaro?
YES! We were one of the first ones to do trials in this area for bayer when they brought it out. There was really no comparison, prosaro far better. Caramba vs prosaro was always very close. If I'm doing wheat on wheat for whatever strange reason I'll switch it up to caramba or like last year we had a big basf year for some reason and the caramba penciled out very good so we used that instead. This year going back to prosaro since I have a lot of liberty acres.
 

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There's people out there that don't spray for fusarium on their wheat these days? Hmm, had no idea! Thought that was standard practice.

If you are looking for quality and bushels, the best bang for buck is treatment at heading around first flowering. You'll have to research best practices, bayer's website is very good for that. Somewhere along the line of head emergence and 50% flowering is best but does matter on each variety a bit on how it matures. Protecting the flag leaf sometimes is good too, but I have found it's hit and miss. Also I don't want to be out in sprayer all summer (I have a family) but we do know that spraying for FHB does wonders. Spraying on flag is a very good choice on barley and oats though, no FHB grading issues there. For flag leaf twinline and quilt are very good, I suggest using the one where you get the best rebate back if using basf or Syngenta products. For FHB, caramba or prosaro is way to go, again use what you get the best price on. I don't think one is better than another in this area, all four of these are great products. Don't get talked into a cheap one though like tilt or folicur, you won't be as happy. If you're going to spend the time and money on something, use the better ones IMO. Definitely leave a check stripe in every field or variety so you can see the benefits of your investment. I would do flag leaf spraying if you are growing something for the feed market.

You're probably late in game to get any proline, but it is the best for canola. Sells out very quickly. I've tried some others and I like astound but annoying that's powder. But proline is very good, actually if you could afford to put that on wheat you'd be far ahead too (prosaro is proline + folicur).

I will not grow a flax crop without spraying headline mid flowering. It's just not worth it in our area. First two years I did it the check strip was 10-15 bushels better. I don't leave check strips anymore.

Last two years we have been 80-90% coverage in fungicides. Years before that it was just cereals and some oils. Quality and bushels have gone up. I think I will always do the cereals as it just easily pays, canola can be hit and miss but is a good insurance policy. I am planning on doing farm wide this year, already have it all sitting in shed.
Not sure if I understood right but spraying headline at fusarium timing has been proven to increase fusarium levels. We have been told many times by Basf reps not to do this. Prosaro and caramba are better choices. In fact any strobulurin fungicide at heading will do the same. Great flag leaf products though.
 

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So if my cost is 6 bushels(prosaro airplane) on soft winter wheat that has 10% winter kill and now another 10% or more drowned out are the odds better for gaining or losing with an application on heads? Have not done much in the past so asking guys with experience.
 

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Not sure if I understood right but spraying headline at fusarium timing has been proven to increase fusarium levels. We have been told many times by Basf reps not to do this. Prosaro and caramba are better choices. In fact any strobulurin fungicide at heading will do the same. Great flag leaf products though.
You are correct but he was referring to spraying Headline on flax.

Bayer would claim that Prosaro on the head would be best because they don't have a good flag product. Main thing is to protect your flag leaf, the fusarium benefits will depend on the weather at flowering but that application helps with leaf disease too. Once you lose your flag you can't get it back.:(

Here it pays to do both applications but that will vary with yield potential/varieties/moisture. I would be surprised if one or both applications didn't have a payback unless you have a light crop.;)

skgrain I would do a ground application and get a 100% better job and you can shut off the boom in the poor areas. AND if the grain companies would stop ripping us off on the basis it would take less bushels still to make it pay.:rolleyes: There is a rebate too.
 

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There was a year I didn't spray follicure and I regretted it big time. I spray once just after the head pops out of the boot that way your protected from grading issues. (Fhb, smudge etc). Also as stated a definite yeild benefit. But if your flag leg looks pretty bad you should spray twice IMO.
 

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Different conditions

There's people out there that don't spray for fusarium on their wheat these days? Hmm, had no idea! Thought that was standard practice.

If you are looking for quality and bushels, the best bang for buck is treatment at heading around first flowering. You'll have to research best practices, bayer's website is very good for that. Somewhere along the line of head emergence and 50% flowering is best but does matter on each variety a bit on how it matures. Protecting the flag leaf sometimes is good too, but I have found it's hit and miss. Also I don't want to be out in sprayer all summer (I have a family) but we do know that spraying for FHB does wonders. Spraying on flag is a very good choice on barley and oats though, no FHB grading issues there. For flag leaf twinline and quilt are very good, I suggest using the one where you get the best rebate back if using basf or Syngenta products. For FHB, caramba or prosaro is way to go, again use what you get the best price on. I don't think one is better than another in this area, all four of these are great products. Don't get talked into a cheap one though like tilt or folicur, you won't be as happy. If you're going to spend the time and money on something, use the better ones IMO. Definitely leave a check stripe in every field or variety so you can see the benefits of your investment. I would do flag leaf spraying if you are growing something for the feed market.

You're probably late in game to get any proline, but it is the best for canola. Sells out very quickly. I've tried some others and I like astound but annoying that's powder. But proline is very good, actually if you could afford to put that on wheat you'd be far ahead too (prosaro is proline + folicur).

I will not grow a flax crop without spraying headline mid flowering. It's just not worth it in our area. First two years I did it the check strip was 10-15 bushels better. I don't leave check strips anymore.

Last two years we have been 80-90% coverage in fungicides. Years before that it was just cereals and some oils. Quality and bushels have gone up. I think I will always do the cereals as it just easily pays, canola can be hit and miss but is a good insurance policy. I am planning on doing farm wide this year, already have it all sitting in shed.

Kinda like how I used to think everyone harvested wheat when it was 116 degrees out and limiting factor for a combine is keeping it cool. Different conditions for different areas...we rarely spray wheat at heading, only years like this that are extremely wet. Most years we just hope heat doesn't hit too hard and burn the crop down to a shriveled 53 pound test weight.
 

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We have never sprayed for FHB. But we do spray for leaf disease... that gives you yield and if the plant is healthy and you don't have a lot of wind at wheat flowering FHB spray is a waste of money.


around here guys got dinged hard one year and now throw money out the window to save their crop from a non existent problem.

If you are closer to Manitoba Def. Spray. It'll pay every time.

Caramba in wheat and acapella in canola and peas are our choices.
 

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Kinda like how I used to think everyone harvested wheat when it was 116 degrees out and limiting factor for a combine is keeping it cool. Different conditions for different areas...we rarely spray wheat at heading, only years like this that are extremely wet. Most years we just hope heat doesn't hit too hard and burn the crop down to a shriveled 53 pound test weight.
100% right. It may not pay in the op's area even though it will here.
 

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I think a lot depends on whether your wheat variety has fusarium resistance and how big of a grading factor fusarium is. In Durum wheat the pay back on a wet year for prosaro or carumba can be huge both in grade and yield.
 

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FHB has been more than a one year thing in NE Sask...in high disease pressure situations the best practice is to spray at both T2 (flag) and T3 (head) timings as many do in Manitoba. Fortunately in our area of the world that is not yet our reality, so our approach is usually to wait for T3 timing and spray with Prosaro unless disease is very aggressive and moving significantly onto penultimate/flag leaves that will impact yield, in which case we will opt for a T2 application with a strobi product like Twinline instead.
 

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We have never sprayed for FHB. But we do spray for leaf disease... that gives you yield and if the plant is healthy and you don't have a lot of wind at wheat flowering FHB spray is a waste of money.
HUH? Where the heck are you selling your wheat? We've had FHB problems since 2010, and probably before that. Samples to the elevator result in dockage of grade 1-2 grades, not spraying usually results in feed. We aren't that far away, don't know how you can say that! Yes last year was better because we didn't get rain after july 20 but I still leave check strips and the yield was still higher than 5 bpa.

You have to choose something, can't do both applications all the time in a cost effective manner. Have to consider price of wheat too as well as the quality being harvested in US. They have high protein so protein spreads are going down so bushels is the most important thing to get this year.
 

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Also in NE sask and we got hammered by FHB a few years ago. Like Mike Tyson in his hay day against Pee-wee Herman. On our own field trials at half flower is money in the bank. At flag might as well been pissing it away. Your still protecting the flag at half flower as well.
 

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This is all highly variable depending on prevailing winds, disease pressure, moisture conditions and variety tolerance as well. We've had FHB here since 1984 and depending on the year and the variety I grew, we've had some nasty ones. Totally put us out of the Glenlea/extra-strong variety market by the early 90's. These days I've been getting away with sticking with resistant varieties ( probably grew Cora longer than anyone else in the area) and a single application of Tilt with the broadleaf spray well in advance of flag leaf. There's lots of "evidence" out there that I'm doing it all wrong, but the wheat has graded #1 with very little dockage due to FHB damage for the last 2 wet years. Winter wheat or prairie spring wheat growers in the area are doing multiple fungicide applications.
 

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Im doing 2/3 of my durum at flowering for the first time ever, using carumba.. Had sprayed tilt at flag in the past, but from what im reading here is the best dollars spent is at flowering.. I hope so. Ive been getting so many mixed reports on what is best. I definitely like to get an unbiased report from a producer on this forum. At this stage my durum is looking better than any other year, one more rain would seal the deal.

Nice mustang, when you say your getting a 5-10 bu bump, what are your avg yields? 50-60? mine would be 35-40 in my sandy soil.
 
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