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“We are extremely proud to have recaptured the Guinness World Records title for harvesting almost 30,000 bushels of wheat in eight hours, shattering the previous record by more than 4,409 bushels,” stated Hedley Cooper, Head of Harvesting Product Management. “This record demonstrates the unsurpassed capacity and productivity of the CR10.90 Elevation, especially as the current record of 24,832.87 bushels was broken after just six hours and 36 minutes!”
 

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One place it says 730,000 bu in 8 hours and just below that it say 30000bu in 8 hours with that is believable
No accounting for a error like that, the figures being nowhere near similar.
Best way to avoid conversion errors?
Don't convert.;)
at 131 liters per hour it had better....... for the inch guys its 35.5 gallons per hour or 28.8 canadian gallons.
Where did you get/figure that?
Unless it was on the video that is gone now.

What happened to the video?

Quite a run, good job New Holland!:)
 

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Even at a low .5 percent loss at 148 bu ac almost a full bu loss...Nice seeding job:D

Looks like the cleaning system on the nh/case can handle much more volume than some expected...:p


Makes a guy wonder what kind of losses they had. I can shove a lot more bu/hr through an 8230 than what it can take. If bu/hr is all ur after all combines are pretty impressive.
 

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Makes a guy wonder what kind of losses they had. I can shove a lot more bu/hr through an 8230 than what it can take. If bu/hr is all ur after all combines are pretty impressive.
There is a reason why combine performance is performed side-by-side in the same crop and compared on the basis of MOG feedrate and percent loss. This record doesn't mean much, high grain/MOG ratio, easy threshing conditions I'm sure. For my operation, it has no relevance at all.

Note to combine manufacturers, if you want to sell me on your machine, publish side-by-side comparisons with your competitors. MOG and grain feedrates at 1.5% or 3% loss.
 

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There is a reason why combine performance is performed side-by-side in the same crop and compared on the basis of MOG feedrate and percent loss. This record doesn't mean much, high grain/MOG ratio, easy threshing conditions I'm sure. For my operation, it has no relevance at all.

Note to combine manufacturers, if you want to sell me on your machine, publish side-by-side comparisons with your competitors. MOG and grain feedrates at 1.5% or 3% loss.
I agree it does not mean much...wish our land was that flat and our wheat was that nice!!

It does state in the article that they had to endure a couple rain showers in the afternoon. So I would guess that conditions were not easy but who knows for sure.
 

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There is a reason why combine performance is performed side-by-side in the same crop and compared on the basis of MOG feedrate and percent loss. This record doesn't mean much, high grain/MOG ratio, easy threshing conditions I'm sure. For my operation, it has no relevance at all.

Note to combine manufacturers, if you want to sell me on your machine, publish side-by-side comparisons with your competitors. MOG and grain feedrates at 1.5% or 3% loss.
I get the feeling you know your way around a PAMI report!;)
 

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Very nice record but the devil is in the detail. It was a 630 HP machine. To have that kind of capacity, the wheat must be ez threshing, very short, stubby and basically all heads and little straw to manage! I couldn't imagine this kind of capacity in a normal field with 3ft high straw and any tinge of green or that 630 hp would be gobbled up. I am sure some people can do some impressive bu/hr ratings running stripper headers too on flat ground, dessicated and bone dry.
I would have to assume the 16.4% moisture in the grain was not from the original grain curing process but rather from the crop being dried down once and rained on, otherwise I would question that kind of capacity as some of that straw would still likely be green and there would be no way 630 hp could handle it as efficiently as that was!
 

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I get the feeling you know your way around a PAMI report!;)
Yeah, sure would be nice to have independent testing to help purchasing decisions. Two days ago I had the good fortune to witness a Lexion 760 demo. I measured the loss in canola, 1300 bu/hr with 0.4 bpa loss. Conditions were a bit tough, we couldn't push the machine any faster to see what the limits were on the shoe and separating systems. Really impressed with the machine, wished I could have tested it in more crops, e.g. some hard threshing, long straw HRS wheat. I hear it does well though.

As a comparison, a Deere 9770 was doing 710 bu/hr with 1.8 bpa loss right beside. The next day 590 bu/hr @ 1 bpa loss. Also the next day, a Case 9120 did 945 bu/hr @ 1 bpa loss. In a different field, pretty similar conditions, Massey 9895, 700 bu/hr @ 0.8 bpa loss. I've heard reports of a Deere S690 doing similar to the Case. This is very little test data, hard to conclude much but the Claas seems in a class by itself, just like it's proponents claim. However, given some crazy stories I read on this site, I don't believe much unless I can test it myself. ;)
 

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Honestly, I am not impressed, no straw low, high yields..
All u needed there was a good clean grain elevator...
I am sure there are lexions that could have easily done that with 1/3 less fuel and lower losses..
Clipping 3 inches below the head... Give me a record while dropping straw to bale and u will think its a real record...
 
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