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So searching for a larger combine around the $100,000-$150,000 mark. Leaning towards a 9870 deere which from what i read in our part of western canada (sw manitoba/ se sask) it should do about 60-70% more than my 9600s so using them for referance with cart we are 8-10 acres per hour. use 10 for easy math the 9870 would be 16-17 acres per hour. I know the lexion is bigger but parts backup and simplicity goes to the deere. What has be curios though is the claim a wide body lexion can harvest 25 acres per hour in cereals is this accurate? 2.5 times more than my 9600 50% more than a 9870?

If this is correct the lexion is worth looking into the 590s and even older 760/770s fall within that budget. I would pay a little more for such a capacity gain i just dont see its possible. Im not talking spot rate i am talking thrahsing hours divided by acres harvested for the entire season. We arent super high yielding area but on wet years grow lots of straw, Area average for canola is 38 wheat is 47 and oats around 90. We harvest mostly wheat and canola and some oats, soybeans and barley.

Thanks all input is welcome.
 

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I’ll throw my experience on here. We went from a 9600 to 9770sts, then to 760. Our area is extremely heavy straw and generally heavier crops all around - so my numbers offered won’t be comparable - but a good reference none the less.

Going from 9600 to 9770 felt to be roughly a 60% increase. 1.7mph in a 25’ canola swath to 2.8mph in same swath. We were blown away with the capacity increase, but that was 10 years ago.

We have been loyal deere customers for years, ever since a 6620. Heard the lexion hype and was very skeptical, also nervous of parts and dealer support. We demo’d a 670 conventional against our 9770, and were very impressed. That winter we acquired more land requiring more combine capacity. After some very long hard thinking (even runner up bid on a screaming S680 deal) a 760 Lexion rolled in the yard.
I find now I am doing at least 70% more than our 9770, while burning roughly the same fuel. Every bit of hype I found to be true on our Lexion. It is an absolute monster in cereals, even canola has been very impressive. It was a very steep learning curve and it took me 3 years to finally feel like I have it set right and understand it in all crops.
One thing I have learned is that what one person uses to measure crop loss can vary significantly to the next. If someone is happy with their deere, the won’t be happy with a lexion. This is due to the complexities of the machine, the odds and ends that do break (nothing major so far) and just the fact it is a big step from a Deere. But if someone truly understands how to monitor combine loss levels (through the variations of humidity in a day) and understands how to react settings on conditions, they will absolutely fall in love with a lexion. The grain loss is absolutely unbelievable, and combined with the fuel burn makes me never want to go back to Deere.

I will add a final note here - we’ve been nothing short of disappointed after our Deere dealer assimilated into Cervus. The personal relationship feel was lost. Our Claas dealer has been absolutely top notch - understanding that we are a farm that buys a combine maybe once in 5 years. The claas parts availability here has actually been stronger than deere. Now this is in central AB, and we are 1 hour drive from 3 dealers, but all of the small oddity parts that we’ve needed have been easily located. And anything so far that has gone wrong in the field, is usually fixed by ourselves with a phone call to a tech walking us through how to deal with it. I thought I knew how to set a combine and monitor loss before Claas, I had no idea. I feel as though there are many others like me who believed deere combines (pre X9) can actually compete - there isn’t a chance.
 

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I believe combines are like your spouse.
You stick with what you know.
I’m sticking with my case.
To old change now.
but I do believe claas is a vary good wheat machine.
 

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In tougher conditions, the 590 will be 15 percent more capacity than a 780 Deere. On a hot sunny day they would be close to the same. In canola a 590 will be way better for loss than a Deere. We run a 590 and a 595. With some modifications these combines will give any Deere model a run for their money.
 

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Deere is easier for most drivers to hit the sweet spot on settings vs the lexion. If you are the type of operator that likes adjusting and tweaking, then the lexion is for you. If you harvest tough straw the lexions are for you.

I primarily harvest dry crops and my older operators don’t like all the adjusting on the lexion (they crack grain like crazy in dry conditions). My next combines won’t be lexions. I bought on all the hype here on combine forum and in my case it was more hype than reality.
 

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We had a lexion along with a deere. Switched to 2 deeres.
1 i dont run the combine, usually my mom and my wife do or a trainee.
2 found tech support lacking from our dealer vs green dealer.
3 deere gps and operation of combine is super simple.

If i could i woulda went lexion again. Fuel use and losses are higher on the deere when you push them too hard. But with 2 woman operating them and at 9:30 at night they are usually fed up driving all day we decided green was the better way for us.

Again if you want capacity and good fuel use id say lexion is the best.
 

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my vote is a 2011 9770 jd, fits your budget,parts are easy,service is easy, fuel is way better than a 9870,635 hydraflex headers are cheap and work good.fd 70 macdons work great.food for thought, we run one beside a 9540 agco and the agco burns 1/3 less fuel and and has 1/3 more sieve area. agco parts have never been an issue.
 

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It might depend upon your criteria for what you call "capacity". If you are simply going by how much crop can be stuffed in the front and keep things coming out the back (throughput), it will depend on your crop and conditions. Generally, Lexions excel in tougher conditions when compared to other makes. In dry conditions, most any combine can likely shove the crop through nearly equally........until you add in other factors such as these below.....

If you consider capacity as a measure of low grain loss, again, the Lexions seem to excel here as well.

If your measure of capacity uses fuel/area as a metric, again, Lexions are known for less fuel use.

So, you have had Deeres, where does that leave them....I guess from what I gather, they do what a combine is meant to do, but maybe more at an average level. For some, they love there electronics, dealer support, familiarity, etc....

I don't think for most, Lexions are a magic bullet, but often when given a chance, a real eye opener on how a different design can perform. Yes, more moving parts, but for good reason. And if you want low fuel use, low grain loss, and high capacity at the same time, they are worth looking into.

I suppose they aren't for everyone....they aren't perfect. I think a demo would be the best option for you to see for yourself, or buy one and give it a try. You can always resell it.
 

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Twix we find the grain samples better than a Deere. A lexion cracks if you run your cylinder speed to fast. Unthreashed heads are much less of a problem in wheat with our lexion than a Deere. We have found the Lexion to be very gentle in soybeans and lentils. If you slow up the cylinder in a lexion cracks are not a problem most of the time.
 

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Another thing I think is a big deal is the ability to control threshing and separation independently. Can adjust the cylinder down to reduce cracking - while keeping max rotor speed and maximum separation ability.
 

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I came from a 9600 JD and now run a Lexion 670, it does double the work of the Deere while throwing over about the same. If you’re straight grain farming get a Claas with a hybrid, light barley floats out the back of our walkers easily.
We have cattle and need straw that’s why we went with another walker machine
Been running the Lexion for a season and half and it’s been pretty bullet proof. no in field breakdowns yet
 

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I avg 26aph with a 760 this year for a total avg on 1700 acres wheat. 45’ head set max speed to 6.4. In your yields and low straw I bet you be close.
 

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I avg 26aph with a 760 this year for a total avg on 1700 acres wheat. 45’ head set max speed to 6.4. In your yields and low straw I bet you be close.
Vailcat is that a 45 ft Macdon you run?? We have 40 fts and in our straw conditions it be tough to do a good job cutting at 6.4. Unless straw is dry and standing perfectly anything beyond 4.5 to 5 is pushing it. Oats is even worse. Maybe that's where the FD2 might be better. I think that's one of the challenges with the big combines is doing a good job keeping them full while doing a good cutting job.
 

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Straw was standing and dry. Was very poor year for us here. I agree Macdon needed an fd2 sooner by sounds of way they cut. They do not do the job well in soybeans when you are over 5mph.
 

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I do not consider myself a combine expert, but my experience with my 760tt in 2021 was this: Had a field that had freakish yields unlike I've ever remotely come close to seeing before. My 9670sts was tuned to be better than a 9770 and when I headed across the field on my first pass I became instantly plugged. Pushing 1 mph and plugging every 100ft lasted for about a half mile until we turned around and retreated. We left the field and I had my 760TT bought within two days. I have not experienced it in beans yet, but I'm telling you the Lexion 760tt is a freak of nature, itself, and how it eats corn. How my JD 612c kept up without burning up is beyond me. The thing flat out gets it in corn unlike anything you've ever thought you'd imagine. If you get the 500 bushel extension you better take it easy with wet corn bc once you burn the belts once, you will need to replace them or suffer plugging when you get the hopper that full of wet corn again. The system wasn't made to pump corn up to 500 bushel in the tank, but I also wouldn't trade that space for anything smaller now either. For what that is worth. All the talk about resale value and blah blah blah means jack nothing when a machine eats corn like that. I don't care what trade in is because I'll keep the one I got. It pays it forward and for itself repeatedly in the most important way. The only other crappy part is that although the track system is by far superior in all aspects and there is no room for debate on that fact, it will be interesting to see how narrow of tracks it can handle for it to be able to do relay cropping and picking corn out of the beans. Commercial farmers are going to be waking up to a new way of cultural practices at some point, because its only a matter of time until it becomes known in Midwest that many farmers are doing something entirely different and it works. My 9670 can lose a dual and not drag beans down to the ground as we're going through picking the corn on 60" rows. If I can't put narrower tracks on the 760tt it is still such an amazing machine that I may choose to run over a bean row and give it back to the soil as a credit for the following year. In sum the Lexion 760tt will blow your mind! I am not a color partial person and own all colors under the sun.
 

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Everyone has said they love the Lexion in tough conditions but we also love ours in dry conditions. We grow lots of straw but it’s very dry straw at harvest - the rotor covers are the perfect answer(as well as ability to separately control threshing and separation) to control sieve overloading with dry matter. Our speed limiter was always sieve loss due to overloading with dry matter and the purchase of the lexions solved the problem. We love the fuel efficiency as well - great bonus!
 

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They are good in dry conditions because of the adjustability but won’t out run a CR combine in dry. In tough going it will leave them pretty easy.
 

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They are good in dry conditions because of the adjustability but won’t out run a CR combine in dry. In tough going it will leave them pretty easy.
We went from CR’s to Lexions. Lexions outperformed CR’s in all conditions-not even a competition
 
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