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I was wondering if anyone on here grew oats and could tell me some information on them compared to wheat, like bushels an acre and fertilizer. I've never planted them before and we used to plant wheat but it doesn't pay, we may as well plant it to corn. we need the straw and the local feed mill wants the oats so I was hoping it would work out.
 

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Oats in our Region Red River Valley Manitoba, Usually yield about 80 - 120 bu a year. Usually put about 30 lbs of P and about 65 lbs of N per acre. You can put more N but you need a variety that stands well or else it will lodge pretty bad. Generally a pretty cheap crop to grow. We usually don't apply any fungicide. Usually just some MCPA for broadleafs there isn't much you can spray for grasses though so usually need a good preseed burnoff.
There is a new variety out called triactor which i think will handle Nitrogen pretty good. Some neighbors grew it and averaged about 140 bu acre with one field doing about 200 bu/acre.
 

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200 bu. would be nice.. well even 100 would be nice. nobody really grows them around here so I don't know what the difference in yield would be with our climate.
 

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just wondering if anyone is spraying a fungicide on their triactor oats. sounds like it has a lot of resistance to rusts. first time growing triactor.
 

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So, it doesn't pay you to grow wheat, but it might to grow oats? I'd be very surprised if that turns out to be the case when all is said and done.
 

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When its all said and done you might be left scratching your head. And for sure everything else.:D

Your location will determine how oats may yield for you. Oats like moisture and cool temperatures. If they weren't itchy I would grow some. We used to get 110 pretty consistently as long as they were seeded early.
 

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Well oats in this area pencil out pretty good and good for our crop rotations. We seed orrin and clean our own seed. Seed at 2.5 bushels per acre or a little heavier depending on seed weight (not uncommon to get 45+ lb oats). Put down 30 lbs of phos, 70 lbs of N and hopefully field has some sulfur left in it, otherwise its best to have some added to your nitrogen. Some guys put potash down to help with straw strength but orrin and morgan are good standing oats. We seed ours close to last and is usually harvested right in middle, its a quick crop and faster than barley. You need to preburn to get any volunteer cereals or wild oats and prepass works well. In crop herbicide is about $8-9 per acre. We spray our oats at flag stage (same as barley) with quilt or twinline. Usually get 120-130 bpa but can go up to 170-200 bpa, last year 155. Sold oats for no less than 3.50 and up to 3.75 (if I held out it was over $4 here for a while). So if you pencil that out, you make more per acre net than an average wheat or barley crop as long as you get the bushels and 3.50 per bushel.

A helpful tip...although not on the label, jumpstart on oats has increased our yearly yields by 8-10%. We were first to do trials on it and this year you have almost see the line.
 
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we treat our oats seed sure helps with drowning in spring.
hate growing it, although its easy to combine and easy to manage residue (oat straw decomposes pretty fast)
Have a tough time getting a nice stand.
Lots of crop to haul for a big cheque, get frustrated with having a nice stand of oats and seeing the wild oats poking threw here and there, than you know your covered for another 7 years of spraying for wild oats.

never knew oats needed sulphur badly... maybe should give it a try.
we put more nitrogen on it but than in NH3 form through midrow band, never had an lodging issue yet.
 

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Well oats in this area pencil out pretty good and good for our crop rotations. We seed orrin and clean our own seed. Seed at 2.5 bushels per acre or a little heavier depending on seed weight (not uncommon to get 45+ lb oats). Put down 30 lbs of phos, 70 lbs of N and hopefully field has some sulfur left in it, otherwise its best to have some added to your nitrogen. Some guys put potash down to help with straw strength but orrin and morgan are good standing oats. We seed ours close to last and is usually harvested right in middle, its a quick crop and faster than barley. You need to preburn to get any volunteer cereals or wild oats and prepass works well. In crop herbicide is about $8-9 per acre. We spray our oats at flag stage (same as barley) with quilt or twinline. Usually get 120-130 bpa but can go up to 170-200 bpa, last year 155. Sold oats for no less than 3.50 and up to 3.75 (if I held out it was over $4 here for a while). So if you pencil that out, you make more per acre net than an average wheat or barley crop as long as you get the bushels and 3.50 per bushel.

A helpful tip...although not on the label, jumpstart on oats has increased our yearly yields by 8-10%. We were first to do trials on it and this year you have almost see the line.
X2 Great explanation
- We seed heavy enough to maintain 24 plants/ft3 with 75%-80% survival rate. This year this calculation worked out to 135 lbs/ac of seed.
- Do a preburn to get all the little weeds before seeding
- We apply 65lbs N as NH3 in the fall. Seed place 25lbs/ac actual P, 20lbs/ac actual K, and 8lbs/ac actual S.
- Oats usually is up in 7-10 days and grow fast
- Usually spray Stellar or Frontline XL in crop for weed control
- Spray half rate of Propiconazole (Tilt, Pivot, Bumper etc.) with herbicide
- Spray Quilt or Twinline at full Flag (I wil not grow oats without spraying a fungicide at herbicide and full flag - it just works too good not to)
- If you want to straight cut for harvest you will have to dessicate the oats first otherwise the oats are dry but the straw is pretty tough to go through combine.
- Yields are usually 130-150bu/ac but some areas I'm sure go 175bu/ac or more according to the calibrated yield monitor
- We grow oats every year and always do good
- You can also let them stand if you want and they won't shell out (well other than last year in the freak windstorm we had)

I have never used Jumpstart on Oats but maybe I should be. I use it on all my Canola and have always seen good results.

I would rather grow Oats than Malt barley any year. Less stress, less inputs, less worry about weather, better tolerance to wet years, more frost tolerant etc. Need to get $3.00/bu minimum and I try to hold out for $3.50/bu plus.
 

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To what I said, prices are up to usually over $3.50 to near $4, and that has been a nice change.
 

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Wondering what most guys grow for variety on pretty dry land? I have been growing Dana a variety out of Minnesota according to the state collage that variety the saw fly's like the best.. their larva do not survive. I have been so mad at saw fly's that is why I mainly grow oats. Dana I am very impressed how much quicker they pop out of the ground they are not reall tall close to A J variety... I have planted owtona's before and they were super slow compared to Dana... I do have shelling problems every year. Just had a hail storm go through last evening the straw heald up really good however the was probable 1/3 of kernels' on the ground...Biggest problem for me is trying to get them sold not much of a market for them around here.. I am not overally impressed with Dana yuild but love the shorter straw. I even grew some under a pivot and so far standing up great....
 
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