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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Been a while for me since i have posted here. I have recently gotten more control of farming operations and not surprisingly things have finally gotten a little profitable.
Enough about me....

I got my farm into the 3rd year of the inital trial for the nitrogen producing bacteria branded "pivot bio proveN".
I figured i would do the shameless sales pitch.... from a farmer.
I had four field trials and applied the product to 800 acres of corn this year. The trials showed what was expected but i will talk about my experince and also at the same time describe the sales side of the product.
Last fall youtube videos brought my attention to the product as i get alot of news there. Having ordered 240 acres worth allowed defered payment until October, i figured why not, we have all heard about this stuff why not try it.
Come February i learned that if you were to order 540 acres of product, they offer a money back guarantee if it fails. (I did have product failure in one field i will explain later.) At this point i increased the order to 800 acres worth of product.
I personally am not a fan of order by acre because everything in farming is order by gallon or oz. But about 12 oz per acre is the best rate for results. The product comes in 4 gallon bladers.
As the lie know as COVID started, (asprogillius parasiticus spore) the company uses a direct ship method which worked well as you can pick when you want the product shipped. The product is a living bacterium so this makes sense and has to be stored bove 32 degrees and below 70, just to keep them alive.
After a month in my basement the entire house smelled like bread dough. (Which is a good sign).
When planting season arived, it is advised to mix directly with your starter for seed placement fertilizer. It needs to be placed on or in the seed furrow for the roots to grow into it.
Once the seedling roots are out of the seed the bacterium immediately attaches and starts feeding on the sugars released by the seedling to start the colonizing the roots.
Thats the sales pitch... after digging plants, at 5th leaf, root masses were larger and more fiberus. Plants had larger diameter stalk already. The bacterium starts producing ammonia immediately, just not large amounts, which promoted fast root development. This helped the plants reach the fertilizer that was placed down by the planter before it leached away.
This bacterium feeds off of the plant released sugars off the roots, in one field where i had light sandy soil, planted prior to two weeks of cold and wet, i had complete failure of parts of the corn field. Which told me, the living biotic can just die.
In that same field was a trial we had, it yielded 4 bushels an acre, 1lbs test weight heavier and 1 pt drier in moisture. I talk about it because you need to recognize that its a living product.
I will post more, just in between hopper loads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I used water as my carrier as we had not been running popup fertilizer.
No sulfur or salts when using the production as there are a few things that will kill the bacterium. It is a mix and plant immediately kind of a thing for the most part just due to what it is.
The picture i just posted was another field trial where it was not applied. That field was planted the day before the start of a 5.5 inch rain event in wisconsin. The picture was at post applied nitrogen as you can see and i was unable to take it to yeild data as you can see why. The treated corn was an entire colar ahead.
The old man was impressed with the difference.
Another trial i had out which was small like that one recieved alot of wildlife damage and was also thrown out.
The final trial we split a field with marginally wet field and poor soil types the bacterium showed a 17 bushel advantage. This i believe was due to a range of factors from germination and seedling vigor.. the accelerates root growth responce and nitrogen fixation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
All in all, i have already ordered 800 acres for next year which is looking like all the corn acres we will have.
Much of the yeild data that the company collects if from yeild maps and combine data, where i took my sample areas to our local cooperative and delivered the grain weighing equal area separate.
The next few posts i want to hit one topic and tell you what my observarions and thoughts were.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Company sales program...

Pivot bio has gone the farmer to farmer route. They reached out to many local producers or seed dealers to sell the product.
"It feels like Amway "

I signed up to be a representative and potentially sell the product.. but as i look around and talked to other people, many seed salesman are not going to be pushing the product as many large companies in the near future will have thier own product to sell that may work or not.
Market penetration for them is difficult, and i see why they have done what they do. In a few years everyone will be selling a different product and who knows if it will work..
Jerusalem artichokes was a joke for a reason....
I dont see any issue with it, but only when your from 50 miles away, or you sway complete control over people will they be willing to try it. And people who have that kind of influence are people i tend not to trust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Why did the product fail in parts if some of your field?

This is not common but rather rare, but is known to happen.
The bacterium is alive. In light sandy soils during a longer deration of cold the corn plants shut down to preserve themselves.
7 days after planting we had freezing rain. With soil temperatures being cold the corn didn't continue feeding the bacterium and stay alive with limited sugars.
That field is also known to have low orgainc matter and fertility.
Basically they starve and loose population. Then when growth starts again, the bacterium is behind and trying to play catchup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Mid august, treated on the left..

This check responded with 4 bushels but i believe it would have excellent results for overall corn silage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The time to order product is running out for most rebate programs for early order will likely be closing down just like everything else in agriculture.
Early order discounts, volume discounts, early adopter discounts.
They have many insentives to get more people trying thier product.

As far as my old man.
He was excited about plant growth throught the year...
Pissed when the bill came...
Saw more results and is all on board with the product.
For our farm it returned more ROI then what the price is before discounts.
At 20 dollars an acre USA, before rebates and discounts, we will be using this product for a long time.
If anyone has any questions, you can call me on my personal, 920-857-4306, and i can answer more specific questions and sign you up for a local referal
The government has already sold my phone number and i am tired of car insurance calls.. so feel free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
More like 8 years of the idiot not being able to buy more stupid stuff..
Get your home generator and prepare for a drought.
Solar cycle is going to be problematic in the next 10 years.
 

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More like 8 years of the idiot not being able to buy more stupid stuff..
Get your home generator and prepare for a drought.
Solar cycle is going to be problematic in the next 10 years.
What do you mean? Are you talking about heading to the solar maximum like we had in 2011? Long term weather drivers interest me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Follow this guy on youtube.. likely be a good idea.
2021 is going to be dusty, lets just say that.
 

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So how many pounds of N equivalent are you getting from pivot bio. Are you reducing you N rate accordingly, or are you just using this in addition to your normal rate.

Is the payback at least 2-1. I like to see 3 -1 for the risk we take, but that seems a stretch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
We cut back 5 gallons of liquid.

That is actualy a claim they make that the microbes produce nitrogen from the "air"...
They are from California by the way... but based out of iowa...

From what i observed they actually created more pathways for the plant to take up soil nitrogen due to the microbes surviving on the root mass. The air they pull from is in the soil.
In my post applied application i cannot reach the outside 2 rows, (80 foot booms on a 16 row planter puts you in a guess row). This showed me that my early planted corn the plants suffered and without a post applied N, nothing really came of it. It still outyielded the check by 4 bushels in our first field that got post applied in the check.
Later planting dates where the planter applied fertilization showed very little lag in plants and yeild while getting zero post applied. This told me planting conditions and seedling growth are critical. Don't plant when its going to snow... once the plants get up and growing, the microbes are likely safe. So the real damage only occures in the seedling stage where the microbes are still working on colonizing.
For me, field variances and planting date likely had much to do with its noticed difference.
We also do not have yield monitoring data to follow other then the sample test we took.

With knowing that, wet cold soils seriously benefited.. my last trial had much more constant plants and corn. 15 to 17 bushels splitting a 40, is 3 to 1.. and the cutting back on fertilizer didn't hurt any.
I have another farm with similar soil conditions, which was in the picture showed us better seedling vigor and smaller dround outs. Also less leaching of fertilizer due to root grouth. That farm likely would have been very poor all around due to the 5.5 inches of rain. The picture is worth a thousand words.

Pulling some root balls up this fall showed much more root mass then we have ever seen before.

As far as nitrogen that we are getting out of it. They have done plant testing and they showed almost 40 lbs.
The difference is the 40lbs is in the plant.

Another overlooked aspect was the lack of other nutrient deficiencies we tend to see late season in corn on much of our sands. Potash and phosphate deficiency was considerably less. So the mass flow factor was also improved.

This year we also planted some longer maturity corn then normal and were very pleased with how it finish. One field that was planted later and did not recieve any product had that borderline "rubbery" feel. This is when the corn does not mature completly. Higher moisture and lower test weight. The pivot bio definitely pushed the plants maturity. Likely from the increased nitrogen uptake.

My dad combined the last farm where we finished up, and where we had planted the last trial. Where we had other fields with better drainage and soil, he even stated the treated corn was more consistent and he was disappointed that we ran out of product.

Higher organic matter, heavier soils will benifit more then sand. And soil temperatures seem to matter. As a 100% notiller i assume that hurt me. But it has been hard to argue with the overall improvement.

I guess my take away and why i am happy with it. We had better corn because of it. And in some conditions, it was make or break for our year.
Lets put it this way. If you have pivot irrigation and your pumping water out of the Mississippi river, where the nitrate levels are so high, you dont need to post apply nitrogen at all... your likely still going to benifit.
Having reasonable expectations and proper management. I could see 3 to 1 return every year.

Just dont wait to get an order in and the price goes up. Then it may become more difficult. The difference is seed salesman say that every fall, "seed is going to be short in spring" and they never run out.
Last spring, they sold out of product in march. They have been gearing up more production, but i would not be surprised is they sold out again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I was more interested to see it in wheat, but it isn't expected to over winter due to the cold.
Spring wheat is where this product would really shine as they are doing testing on it there.
If i plant oats, for sure i will be seed treating this product on.

I have to follow up with a cooperative this spring for Winfield also has a product now, and i will be doing a head to head, and also the two mixed together.

I wouldnt expect it to replace nitrogen. But i expect better results next year as i am adapting some fertilizer plans and equipment to improve the use of the microbes in our overall system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Corn kernels Corn Yellow Leaf Food


We don't see cobs like this often in the past at the same population. So we know it really pushed this years potential.
 

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So on spring wheat where we run dry fertilizer do you just "innoculate" the seed with the product, or foliar spray it?
 

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So this bacteria doesnt already live in the soil? Or are you just adding more? The check is normal rate of N vs 5 gallons less + pivot bio? Any trials with N stabilizer or super u or 20$ extra N to keep cost =?
 
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