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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
The bacterium was discovered naturally in the soil and lines were studied and worked on culturing in a lab.
It is a novel, or new bacteria. I had looked up the bacterium this spring and it is a known stomach bacteria.
I joked about it being from a digester.. but they have talked about isolating it in the soil.

The bacterium doesnt survive when applied foliar, it needs to be infurrow.
It will survive a day in seed applied fertilization and 2-3 days in water.

As far as other testing, they may have more data, and i am going to be doing some more rate testing next year.
We ran 5 gallons less across the board. With non applied ground, i ran full rate fertilizer. The check was with the lowered rate of fertilizer.
Where i ran the extra 5 gallons of fertilizer on untreated ground was some of the last planted corn, and getting a good comparison was not viable. As that field has a good crown to the field, the majority was good due to heavy rain, but the low wet parts fell flat out.
But as far as what you are asking, i didn't have the time to get too in depth. I haven't looked yet this year for the data that is going to be put out.
With some close by custom planting we did do, it was noticable from the combine as the other farm was moboard plowed with heavy beef cattle manure.
Treated plants where much larger and healthier. Lighter soil, but the amount of rainfall in such an early stag leached much of the early nitrogen.
That corn was very disappointing from those fields that were worked ground and no other fertilizer changes compared to our land.

I know what you are asking, and those are alot of things i will be looking at more this next year. 2019 and 2020 were rain cycles, and that is what i was planning for in 2020.. 2021 is a different plan for it being dryer.
In the last two years, leaching of nitrogen fertilizer was uncharacteristically rampant. Going into next year the plan is to get more nitrogen in the soil. So looking for a product that would improve the plant uptake was what i was looking for.
As far as stabilizers, i do not have good observations on that. I know the neighnors used N-sight this spring... but the problems they had were from soil compaction and the sheer lack of fertilizer use in general
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I searched the product on the forum and i was surprised i didn't find anyone talking about it.
I don't consider myself much of a salesman, because i am not pushing hard and blowing smoke.
It has merits and encourage everyone to look into it more. It will have soil types and conditions it will return more them others.

Like everything else, i ordered in September for next year just by what we saw in the physical corn plants. That was max discount and at the time they offered some free product.
We are also planting 2350 gdu corn varieties. Where longer growing season corn plants will likely allow for more growing season to have more time for the bacteria to produce more nitrogen.
Wheat is still in some trial stages.

I see in the next few years as more competitors enter this market, price points will have to come down. And other products are being marketed cheaper, and yes i will be trying them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
The 20 dollars of extra Nitrogen is a idea we have tried in the past.. with a different test.

Using 150 lbs of urea vs 25gallons of 28%.
The 28% did better, but 15g vs 25g had no difference.
My soil type cannot hold that much nitrogen in place, and the urea did have agritain applied. That was almost 10 year ago, so i know 20g of nitrogen at any one time is max or overkill.
The only way to benifit with extra nitrogen is if your applying just pre-tassel and i do not have the ability to do that, as many do not.
So i think that should answer some of your question about adding extra nitrogen. Timing is as important, and what are the economic side of an extra application and yeild loss to the extra pass in the field.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Did you read the study joe?

As I did say in the beginning about how I saw it significantly improved plant uptake of nitrogen. The claim of the microbes producting nitrogen i did not think was a big push. But after reading the study, the kansas state study showed exactly what I saw with my outside rows that received no post applied nitrogen.
If you look to the graphs at the bottom of the study, Proven increased overall plant yields.
As the 2019 study, if you noticed did not talk about rain fall or conditions with 100% of the nitrogen down pre-plant. With 0 and 150lbs urea out yielding the 50 and 100lbs rates. What does that tell you? Also, it was applied early, and no post applied.
Did you also see how that the 150lbs rate increased yeilds with Proven almost 10 bushels over the untreated?
I am pretty sure that would be profitable.
The main point I wanted you to understand is the plants pulled Nitrogen from the air... the bacteria is on the roots. So the "air" is in the soil. So if fixing nitrogen from the soil solution is what it is good at, then by applying nitrgon to the soil solution will not increase plant uptake?

As far as what I describe as amway Is how it feels where farmers try and sell farmers product. Seed dealers will be pushing it. But would you have a better idea how to reach your target market when 90% of the market is going to not have anything to do with you.
Being first is the only reason they have a chance in the game of big ag.

I have family that sells Amway, and they are super annoying. So I bring it up, and that I don't like it. It does not mean that there are a few products like the deodorant and soaps that Amway sells are really good products.

I hope that answers some of your frustration.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Joe six..

Go back and read the report.. scroll to the charts at the end.
The charts at the end of tbe study tell a completely different story then what you are describing.
I encourage you to actually look at the study.

Thank you for posting it. I appreciate that you brought it up in the thread.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Old thread...

Figure i should do an update this year..

Our corn is just going into tassel and boy did we have issues this spring...
The corn seems to be gaining ground as much of the surrounding corn is starting to struggle on our area..
We have a fungicide application coming in August, but lots of yellow flag leaves in other corn and much stress.

It can be very touchy product for many people and is an expensive learning curve, but they are coming with a multiple bacteria product for next year to increase the nitrogen production capacity.

Its like applying nitrogen with Y-drops without the expense of a high clearance sprayer.
 

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Do you know if this product works in wheat and do you know how much Nitrogen fertilizer it can make or replace for the crop. With fertilizer going through the roof I was wondering if any of these products would be useful or more importantly economic to use.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Sorry, for my late responce...

They are currently in spring wheat testing this year.
The bacteria produces ammonia as it grows and lives.
The amount of nitrogen that is produces will be based on root mass and time alloted..

Other benefits are increased root mass and overall plant uptake.

Winter wheat isn't looking promising as often wheat goes dormant and most of the bacteria will likely freeze of...
I will be looking to try some on my winter wheat this fall, and see if it increases tillers.
 
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