The Combine Forum banner
1 - 20 of 43 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

Have read all the old posts and threads on shops but decided it was time for a specific thread. Our operation has grown to the point where a new shop has become necessity in our cold canadian winters. Currently working out of a 40 x 80 x 12 pole shed with dirt floor and sliding doors in each end.

This new building will be part heated storage for chore equipment & semis & part workshop. On a usual night in the winter we would like to pull in two semis, tractor & mix wagon, tractor & bale processor, wheel loader & telehandler. Besides that would like to leave room for work bay area for projects & maintenance. Current farm size is 7,000 acre grain operation & 900 cow calf operation with back grounding. No current expansion plans.

Looking for suggestions on what size and type of building would be a good choice. Also looking for feedback on things you would/wouldn't do as far as layout, door configuration, heating, tool/oil/part storage, lighting etc.

Current plan is 54x90x20 pole building with a 30' bifold in each end. Floor heat with electric boiler. White metal on inside walls. Rolling workbench, tool storage and oil bar. t5 lighting. Man door in each end. Attached 20x50x10 office, laundry, lunchroom & part storage.

Thanks for your help!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,737 Posts
I have a 50x100 and by the time you have work benches, tool boxes, junk etc you will have a hard time fitting that much equipment in. You won't have a spot to have any one piece in corner torn apart. I would say 50-100% bigger than what your thinking. If the budget constrains you, build it easy to expand on.

Google FBI building planner, it is a company in the USA. There is a free program on there to help decide. Can design shop however you want and put equipment in it sized to your own equipments dimensions. Can add benches and all that stuff. It's a great program, have spent hours on it trying to decided on size of a cold storage building and wish I had known about it 5 years ago when I built my first heated shop.

Have fun and take your time, try to look at other peoples shops to get ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,013 Posts
Was looking at putting up a 60 x 100. Went to look at a buddy's shop and he did a 60 x 120'. The extra 20 feet made a big difference, so that is what I'm planning on putting up now. Putting up a mezanine on the one end, lunch room and bathrooms underneath it. 32 foot door on one end and a 24 door on the side towards the other end, 18' tall doors and 20' ceiling.

When I drive in the super b that extra 20 feet gives you lots of room in front of the semi now at 120' length. I put some stakes in the ground and did a trial run with the semi and other equipment to see how well it would all fit and how much work room there will be. There will be a few pieces of equipment stored in there as well.

Started levelling the site, but the cold weather caught up to me. Will be starting it in the spring.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,107 Posts
You will need it atleast 50% bigger if you want to have that all inside and still use it for a shop. My shop is 50x100 and tonight I have a semi and triaxle grain trailer inside, a 4wd tractor with a blade, mfwd with a loader, and a 585 case forklift. Basically it is full. There is enough room left to work and to bring a 1/2 truck in if needed. Its amazing the amount of room all your tools and equipment take up. You can basically kiss 6 feet deep of space along your walls gone.

You might also want to make sure one door is big enough to drive a swather in or a combine with a straight cut header without taking it off for the late night repairs that always seem to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Defiantly build bigger than that if you want to park all that in there and still work on projects that could be in there for weeks ripped apart waiting for parts. Built a 60 by 120 12 years ago. Biggest regret is only going with 16 foot ceiling. As for doors we have over head 20 foot wide on both ends and a clear see through on the south that is only 10 feet wide good for bring in telehandler and such lose a lot of heat opening big doors to run in small equipment. Like the over head as they are fairly fast to open and close. As mentioned before it's amazing how much room is lost to crap building up along walls. We have our lunchroom bathroom office in one corner with parts on top. Next time I would have the office lunchroom bathroom attached to the outside with access door from the shop as well as from the outside so visitors truckers don't have to walk through shop to get to office. And would be a lot quiter in there. Also be nice to have air compressor in a separate room to eliminate a lot of sound. And lights don't cheap out on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,737 Posts
If I could do it again, I wouldnt go much longer than 100, but I would want way wider, have it set up so you almost have a alley in the middle and park equipment to one side on angle or something. Than those nights you want to put extra in, you have that middle. Just a thought, there are so many different and good ideas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I was hoping that by using the entire floor area (no stationary work benches to pile stuff on), we could maybe make the most use out of the space. Same would apply to attaching the part storage and office. Would love to go larger, but not sure that 50% bigger is in the budget right now. I priced 54 x 120 as well but the cost seemed to go up substantially.

I also considered going way longer and only putting concrete in half but insulating the entire building. That way the equipment would be warm, and could concrete the rest at a later date.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,198 Posts
At first glance it seems like you have too much stuff to put in and start everyday. But you have a very nice size farm and you likely can justify it. So you need to either figure out how to plug a machine in or put a webasto on it outside or build bigger.

If anyone needs 60x120 you are the guy. 60x100 minimum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
We are also provincial accredited to do truck and trailer safety's so we need a shop large enough to fit the largest truck or trailer we can perform safety's on inside and 120 long leaves enough room to work around by the time you open hoods and want to move wheels and tools around don't want to be tight for room. A shop is a great investment. But a shop is just the beginning it's all the tools and machines that make a shop great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,616 Posts
I can't see all those listed items fitting in that space, having to maneuver off to the side for some, then driving in the last items into the center as I doubt you have enough length for three items in a row. Never mind having anything else at all on that floor space and its a given that there will be objects including a roll around work bench, where does the welder/table and working space sit, the compressor, the boiler to heat the shop, pressure washer, and that is just the beginning. You mentioned wanting room to put oil and so on as well.

I may be way off base here but I am visualizing a shop that is 120 long and at least 70 if not 80 wide so there is room all along one wall for shop equipment and room to work off to that side. Then for doors, two large twin doors on one end with a possible offset to allow for more room along that one wall. Then one large door at the opposite end lined up with the door which is farthest away from the "working area/tool storage" side of the shop. The idea being that two pieces of equipment can be driven into that third door if required or something else entirely to be sitting there and worked on for a period of time, and the through doors having your 3+3 pieces lined up end to end. Of course its easy to sit here and spend someone else's money ;)

As an edit, a few more comments have come since I started this thought and see I wasn't the only one with the 80 wide in mind and as to length, a neighbor built a 50x100 shop this summer and I asked him why he chose that size and he said it was to get his Super B unit inside without having to unhook, but that doesn't give much working room on either end and why the 120 works a lot better.

Here's something that will only cost you a little time and that is to stake out on the ground, the proposed building dimensions ( the inside dimensions, NOT the outside ) and as well stake out the width of the doors and where they will be placed. Then drive your equipment into the imaginary building and see how it fits and what floor space is left to the side or ends. My gut tells me you will be shocked with the results.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
North farmer,

Can you explain the door setup a little more? Do you mean a total of 5 door? Point taken that apparently I need to think bigger. Can you even build a building out of truss rafters of that size or does that mean a steel building? I will get some larger sizes quoted but i think 80 x 120 is going to be well outside of my budget!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
73 Posts
Also don't know where your located but in manitoba need to check local building codes brother in law build one few years ago and even for farm buildings now anything over I believe around the 6500 sq.foot mark need fire stops in the attic which can add extra to building cost he kept his just below size required to eliminate that cost his is 60 by 104
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
147 Posts
I put pea gravel in my 60x 100 heated shop to keep dust down. Added 40x 60 off the side with cement. It's perfect, would not change a thing. 18 foot high becomes 16 foot though when I hung ceiling fans. Building looks like a "t" from the top. Also I put in lots of lighted panels in the top of doors to let light in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,198 Posts
you need to realize that most of us are just having fun with the whole size thing. If most farmers waited until they could afford 80x120, they would have a long grey beard and 2 canes and be too bent over to see anything but the floor of the shop.

At the end of the day the message is build as big as you are comfortable taking a loan for.(calculate how many of dem dere cows are paid for)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
727 Posts
Our shop is 60x120x20. We have two 24'W x 18'H overhead doors with sliding center post in one end(48' opening when post is removed). I'm not a fan of bifold doors in a shop as I find them too slow. In floor heat which i would highly recommend if it's in the budget. We have a 30' x 70' area of the floor sloped to a Udrain floor drain and the rest of the floor is level. Lots of lights! We have 36 four bulb T5 fixtures in our shop and it's very well lit.

Forgot to mention ours is a stud frame on a grade beam. We felt it would be better to build it that way to keep rodents out.
 
1 - 20 of 43 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top