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So to the guys that have done this do you leave the tank up for gas or upside down for liquid? I do not want any talk of why not, it's happening! I have so many half-used cylinders that are lying around and I am always toping up my systems, Very old tired equipment and they are not getting rebuilt.
help me out or go pound salt, I don't want to hear about your "you shouldn't do it crap"
 

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Either way will work.
Feeding in liquid the system will fill a little faster.
Slight chance if it fills too fast with liquid you may lock up the compressor.
In all the years I did air conditioning I always fed the liquid in.
I have one tractor as a test machine must be running on red tek for close to 15 years now.
This one is a leaker and I think it is the compressor seal seeps because it used to hold until this napa rebuilt compressor got installed.
One thing though none of these replacement refrigerants cool like the old r12 did.
 

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I have used propane...works good in some systems not so good in others...pressures are definately differrent, higher on the low side if I remember correct.

Propane should carry any oil but be sure there is sufficient oil in system, if not you could put some in.

If you are filling as a liquid it usually evaporates by the time it gets to the compressor just don't let it in too fast with cylinder upside down(propane). As others have rightly mentioned.

I think it depends on how the system is built whether it works well or not...ie. if it is evaporating and condensing in more or less the right places in the system. That is why the duracool type products blend the differrent hydrocarbons to more closely make it act like 134 or whatever.

Good luck, hopefully it works well in your system as it cools very well and is more environmentally friendly...he...

If anyone is worried about fire...any refrigerant carrying oil as a vapour is the same risk...and as for evaporator leaks at least propane is easy to smell. Not many downsides...
 

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Vacuum down the system to remove the air as you should anyway. I still don't see to much of a fire/explosion risk. If you smell propane, the leak is bad and you probably better fix it. I will be curious how it works. The last 30lb bottle of R-134a I bought was about $100. A bottle last me years even when I do a few for other people. I do reclaim and reuse the old stuff when I can.

Let us know how it works.
 
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