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Reading that sounds like a catch 22, danged if you do danged if you don't for glyphosate weed control, been known it still affects resistant crops but after reading that probably quite a few ways it has to do so.
It does make someone wonder what effects other herbicides are having, and do they hang around longer than previously thought?
 

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Maybe mixing up crops and herbicides also has a benefit on the microbial life of the soil besides all the other benefits. The trick is finding crops to grow that make money, actually grow well in the area you farm, ones that you can control the weeds in, and ones that can be grown without being destroyed by disease. It is not as easy as it use to be.
 

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It does make someone wonder what effects other herbicides are having, and do they hang around longer than previously thought?
In 2016 our next door neighbor had a field of potatoes that started to die very early in the season, and in such a pattern that everyone felt it was chemical damage, but nobody could figure out which chemistry it might be. We do most of the application for this farm so we were involved as well. The owner finally opted for a chemical essay of the plants and soil to see if the cause could be determined, he spared no expense on the test and told the lab to look for everything. The results were SHOCKING, pert near every chemical ever applied to that field since the 1960's was still detectable, including DDT. However, Endura fungicide stole the show. The concentrations were the highest of any chemistry found, and it had been 5 years since the last application. The cause of death for the potatoes was determined to be Velpar if I remember correct, a herbicide for weeds in alfalfa.
 

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In 2016 our next door neighbor had a field of potatoes that started to die very early in the season, and in such a pattern that everyone felt it was chemical damage, but nobody could figure out which chemistry it might be. We do most of the application for this farm so we were involved as well. The owner finally opted for a chemical essay of the plants and soil to see if the cause could be determined, he spared no expense on the test and told the lab to look for everything. The results were SHOCKING, pert near every chemical ever applied to that field since the 1960's was still detectable, including DDT. However, Endura fungicide stole the show. The concentrations were the highest of any chemistry found, and it had been 5 years since the last application. The cause of death for the potatoes was determined to be Velpar if I remember correct, a herbicide for weeds in alfalfa.

If this is true, it doesn't bode well for the future use of chemicals in agriculture. Having said that, it bothers me if those chemicals are staying around that long.
 

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Kevlar the chemical companies make you think its just like applying water and little to none of it persists in the soil after you apply it. So many of these chemicals like fungicides buy yield which helps in the short term but what is the long term effect. For crops like chickpeas were guys apply so many applications of fungicide you wonder what it is doing to the health of the soil. That is one reason why I have avoided this crop.
 

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Just for $hits and giggles, where can a guy get a test like this done and what would the cost be? This isn't something a guy wants to hear really, is it? I figured that these chemicals would break down much quicker than this, never thought it be that long.
 

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I'll have to do some asking on the lab that did the testing, as I don't recall off the top of my head. Usually on these essays they charge per chemistry tested for. When we've been involved in the past it was to try to prove or disclaim a wrongful application accusation, and someone involved (farmer, agronomist, applicator) had an idea of what to look for. In this case with the neighbor, nobody had a clue, and the farmer wanted to know what was going on as this field had a residual issue the last time it was in potatoes (that time was glufosinate) so he ordered the test for everything. It took several weeks to get the results, and it cost enough that the owner wouldn't tell his manager what the total bill was.

I usually don't say too much on these topics because I'm a total hypocrite when it comes to chemical application, between my brother and I we ground rig, cropdust, mark-out for potatoes, and soil fumigate. After being involved in some of these essays, and seeing a general trend of more and more chemicals being needed by some of our customers, we have completely changed our philosophies on our own farm. Some of our herbicides are just spot sprays now, we won't allow soil fumigation on the spud ground we rent out, we've found a natural polymer compound that is awesome against fungal, bacterial, and viral infections, as well as nematodes, and we put out beneficial biology every chance we get. We're also in the process of changing from a nutrient replacement fertility model to more of the Albrecht theory of soil balancing.

I had previously read the article in No Till, and I've become a believer that glyphosate is doing as much harm as it is good. My holy ship moment reading the article was the part about high P soils, and the gly having nowhere to go. I cannot make no till work on most of the dryland I farm. One of the reasons is the Take-All that shows up in the wheat after about 3 years. Well, most of these soils are so high in P that my great grandkids won't have to worry about buying P. If anybody else has ever read any of Dr. Huber's work on the downside of glyphosate.....I'll just say I've become a believer.
 

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Just for $hits and giggles, where can a guy get a test like this done and what would the cost be? This isn't something a guy wants to hear really, is it? I figured that these chemicals would break down much quicker than this, never thought it be that long.
Did some asking today, and the tests on the field I mentioned were done at the University of Idaho. Near as anybody can remember the cost was around $3,000 for the whole essay.
 
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