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With skyrocketing combine prices its a wonder no one has tried to reinvent the past and develop a high capacity pull type combine thats how i cut my teeth all those years ago, no cab no monitors no radio hey life wasnt so bad back then.

ps i live in the real world and nobody build one but just passing thoughts on probably would be at least half the cost one would think.

cheers all 13mm in mid mallee south australia
 

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Worked for a neighbor for a while (2003ish) and he used a Case 1482 behind a jd 7810 and a jd 8820. the 1482 couldn't go as fast as the 8820, also no reverse on it either when you got plugged. Had to quit earlier in the night from dew as well...but it cost way way way less to opperate as well. dont remember what he said it cost the 8820 to run for the year but the 1842 was only a few grand....you lose well over that in depreciation in newer combines. i only hobby farm 360 acres between my father and I. We just hire the neighbors to come and do harvest...they run 3 brand new ones everyother year...nothing but the best for them. $35 acre last yr, field to the elevator. Tough to beat that doing it myself, for so few acres. straight combining would be rather limited on width of a header. Think id rather get a 9600..they are getting pritty cheap now and still cover tons a ground for a small guy like me.
 

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The only 'new' pull type combine that I have seen in the last 10 years is the Mcleod Harvester, and that is a completely different system. We used to have the old 960 Coop's back in the day. Other than that, used PT combines are cheap as all heck, even 9501's which are one of the bigger PT combine you will find around. Once you have had the go anywhere ability of the SP combine, you will never go back.
 

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Decades ago the pull type was a good cheaper alternative for the family sized farm. There are almost none of these left anymore. Many farms are still run by families, but they cover alot of acres and need really high capacity in combines and trucks to get the grain in. Those on the smaller end get by buying used machines from that the bigger operators turn over. I'm afraid the future is even bigger operations that make today's average operation look small.
 

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imagine 600 hp tractor in front of a combine now you are getting something done!!

but with the size of heads how would a guy be able to offset the hitch and still be able to pull the thing straight?

would be a great thing for big wheat country where it could be swathed ahead of time then run a dummy head to pick it up.
 

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My dad had a 6601 JD for 14 years. First combine I ever ran. I never ever want to go down that road again.

Remember the 7721 JD with the 21 foot offset straight head? It looked pretty cool. I think Deere made a 9501 for a short period of time.
 

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good point

Some years ago I had a JD 1051 with an open front. It worked OK for me and was cheap as $hit to buy and maintain. Pulled it with a White 2 150 but a few more ponies would have helped.

The fact is, moving to a SP combine is a natural progression. They have great mobility and capacity. But as old mate says, the cost is getting right up there. I suppose it comes down to preference as to whether you stay with the old girl or immitate the neighbours. At the end of the day, are you making money with a big new shiny beast??????????????
 

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Wow, my neck hurts just thinking of a pull type combine. I was just a kid so I never had the chance to operate one but when my Dad first started farming on his own he had a 6601. That was his biggest complaint about the pull-type.....a sore neck from looking back all the time.

There is a local Mennonite fellow in the area that is fixing up old JD pull-types. I heard that he's planning to pull them down to Mexico and re-sell them.
 

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I have a 9600, and a 7721 Titan II, the 7721 is sure cheap backup and adds 40% to the harvesting capacity if someone is around to run it, I pull it with an 8650 so its over powered but you can pull it where a 2 wheel drive sp wont go. I just like how simple they are to fix and a guy can have a parts machine for the price of the tires. In the 8650 the seat half swivels around so the neck issue isnt soooooo bad haha.
 

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I started out on a pull type combine. Now nearly 40 years later I have gone back to one. Bought a 7721 JD last year mainly for flax. My IH rotary would not do flax so for a little more than the cost of upgrading the rotor and feeder on the IH I now have a second, backup combine. With an mfd magnum up front I think it will go through as much or more mud than the self propelled. And it goes through flax like theres no tomorrow.
 
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Back when I was about 10 we had been running a 1682 for two years, and the neighbour had been running his for about the same amount of time. We had a wet year. While we didn't get stuck, the neighbour did. Sunk the combine to the frame, and the 4WD pulling it was to the frame as well. Mind you no self propelled machine would have even got close to where they were stuck at, Just be careful in the mud, when the go down they go down. Wish I had a picture to post. When we went by the whole family was out there with shovels trying to dig it out. I don't know how they got it out, was probably in school, I imagine there might be one out there somewhere, they were only 50 foot from the main highway.

As a side note though The magnum pulling a pull type combine works well. We had a 7140 on ours and it worked great, except for the sore neck thing.
 

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I started out on a pull type combine. Now nearly 40 years later I have gone back to one. Bought a 7721 JD last year mainly for flax. My IH rotary would not do flax so for a little more than the cost of upgrading the rotor and feeder on the IH I now have a second, backup combine. With an mfd magnum up front I think it will go through as much or more mud than the self propelled. And it goes through flax like theres no tomorrow.
Thanks for sharing.
I've heard that flax can be really tough to combine. I have no experience with flax other than it is good to eat and I like to grind it in a small hand held coffee grinder and add some to the pancake mix. Is it as tough to windrow as it is to combine?
 

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but with the size of heads how would a guy be able to offset the hitch and still be able to pull the thing straight?


Or drive the thing with electric motors off the power of the tractor so that the tractor isn't really pulling it at all. Localization equipment (think GPS, but there may be a simpler solution) on the combine can keep it in sync with the motion of the tractor. With enough horsepower, the combines could be cascaded across allowing one tractor to power several combines.
 

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Thanks for sharing.
I've heard that flax can be really tough to combine. I have no experience with flax other than it is good to eat and I like to grind it in a small hand held coffee grinder and add some to the pancake mix. Is it as tough to windrow as it is to combine?
Not bad to swath as long as the knife and the guards are half decent. I used my old IH 4000 swather to cut flax every year. A pickup reel makes a big improvement keeping the knife cleared and crop flowing .
 

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Hey there I know this is an old post but my OH has been offered a co op 960 pull type combine - its a long ways to go look and we are advised its a go-er so was wondering about their dimensions - mostly weight - we have a truck with a 18ft deck but like I said its a weight thing - the guy said about 5 tons is this right? thanks for help for the newbie
 

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There is a natural resistance to going "back" to pull type combines for the obvious reasons. Reduced ability to straight cut is the biggest IMHO. However with new combine prices approaching one million dollars, I wonder if there isn't a place for a simple and relatively cheap mid size PT. A lot of farms have big MFWD tractors with PS or better yet, CVT that would be excellent power and control for any PTO equipment. Also bigger 4WDs often have PTO and PS but would be pretty clumsy on a combine. Thinking about cost per acre of harvesting, and overall profit at the end of a year, or a career, I do not see any way that a $500,000 or $1,000,000 combine can be viable growing $4.00-6.00 wheat. In 1972 a 914 IH (the pt version of a 915) cost $12,500. Back then 3-4000 bu of wheat PAID for that combine. Input costs were low on those bushels. How do you pay for a new combine today when input costs take up most of or more than a bushel of wheat is worth??? How many bushels of wheat do you have to sell to CLEAR enough to pay for the above new combine?? Stiff neck or not, what can we afford to harvest our crops?

PS I might have a good old Versatile 2000 for sale!!
 

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How about instead of making a cheaper pull type, how about making a cheaper, lower tech , maybe not as, fancy self propelled combine an average farmer can afford? Dad has always wanted to own a new combine but they are rapidly inflating beyond what our farm could ever afford, we got a 2013 cx 8080 this year and that is almost overkill for our 2300 acres, to buy that machine new you would have to do at least 3000 acres to justify the payments.
 

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Hear, Hear!! I still can't quite figure out why smaller and med size combines have gone the way of the dodo bird. It's not just the prices that have gotten obscene... The sheer size and capacity of these things is ridiculous- as Kevlar said: Total overkill for most normal sized family farms. We don't all live and farm in the great plains of North America or in Australia... The other day, I passed a guy in a Gleaner R62- and he took up most of a WIDE street with wide shoulders.

I could say the same thing for walker combines. JD had ONE up until this year- and it's huge. Also costs around $350,000 US. ( the small grain combine) Now they've introduced two new series of them- marketed like it's the coolest new idea ever- but those are even bigger, fancier, and more expensive. I See New Holland is now making a MASSIVE one, too. And of course, they all have fancy choppers and spreaders on them... Isn't the point of a walker to GET good quality straw? At least JD's Small grain combine acknowledges that some of us WANT our straw for baling. ( still too big and pricey, but a step in the right direction)

Sorry for the rant, but it gets old scouring classifieds looking for antique combines to use, that are wayyy out of warranty, can be a challenge to get parts for, and need to be nursed along. Something along the size of an Older Gleaner L, K, or M would be perfect for many-just made in THIS century, with a warranty and a parts supply chain. You might even be able to pay it off before it dies!

Oh, and back on topic, I always loved the old school pull type combines! The ones made for small fields and small tractors- like the Allis All-Crops, or the International and JD equivalents.
 
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