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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Put up a 40x100 pole shed and have it insulated and ready for concrete. Has a 26’ wide overhead door on the 40’ end.

Have bought a 70’ u-drain and planned to slope the concrete 14’ on each end towards the drain and 13’ each side of the drain along the 70’ length. Figured for winter maintenace the snow covered super b or snow moving equipment could drip and run into the drain. There will be no vehicles getting washed inside.

Only going to have about 6’ on each side of the building with level concrete on my original plan. Starting to wonder if I need a level area for using floor jacks to change car/suv/pick up truck tires or brake repairs. Will floor jacks and jack stands work on vehicles with a floor that slopes to a long floor drain or do I need to leave a 16’ wide area that slopes to a floor drain and then leave 16’ wide area with level concrete?

If vehicles straddle the floor drain they would be level, but concrete would have a slight slope on it ( probably 1/3” per 12” of slope).

This will be my only heated work building. It is not for storing equipment.

Work on the concrete that slopes to the drain or pour a larger flat area and have a narrow area of the floor sloping to the drain?
 

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We sloped our drain only 10' on each side of the drain. I think that will be plenty for us and leave most of the rest of the floor flat for working like you say. The slope isn't that noticeable. But I haven't actually tried jacking anything up over that part of the floor yet.
 

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I don’t think you will notice the slope when jacking a vehicle up etc. We don’t in our shop.
 

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I would slope it all. Any moisture in those level areas could run towards walls. I can't remember what the slope is but it is not noticeable for working on equipment.
 

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My shop is 50’ wide. 1/2” slope for every 4’ I think. So just over 3” of slope in 25’. After washing we take a squeegee an do the floor.
 

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We have a heated shop that is 40'x100' as well. We put the same 70' U-drain down the center. Sloped the sides 1" over 10' I believe, and we sloped the ends back to the drain. You will never notice working on a sloped floor, or when jacking things up. We have had ours for 6-7 years now and it has never caused us an issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We have a heated shop that is 40'x100' as well. We put the same 70' U-drain down the center. Sloped the sides 1" over 10' I believe, and we sloped the ends back to the drain. You will never notice working on a sloped floor, or when jacking things up. We have had ours for 6-7 years now and it has never caused us an issue.
How wide each way from the drains did you go with your slope? Right to the wall or do you have a small flat area against each side of the 100' long wall?
 

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The only thing that will mess with jacks is your floor drain itself. Couple things to think about. Will your workbenches all be along the wall or will you have a work area with benches "freestanding" away from the wall? Do you have any machine tools that need a level surface? Most likely you will need to shim anything that needs to be level anyway.

If you aren't washing anything I don't think you would gain much by sloping everything. And it is much easier to go for flat concrete than to try get a slope to be consistent.

If you are looking at it primarily for a semi or tractor snowblower type stuff I would be tempted to put the drain more to one side. I know in our case we have several long term projects that always take longer than projected. With the drain in the middle it means the long term stuff needs to be mobile or parked where the drain isn't. If it were off to the side I think we would have more useable space. Combines probably warrant a wider sloped area but squeegees work pretty good for any escapes.

If you are doing lots of wheel/ball joint/brake work I would plan a spot for a lift. Cheap to prep for before you pour. Looking at adding one now and with a sloped floor and floor heat to boot it makes it more difficult. I'm fairly young but getting up and down from the creeper or mechanic seat all day to grab different tools gets old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Glad to know that the slope is not bothering with jacking things up. Was hoping to throw 4 jacks under and lift the whole truck for tire rotations.

Slope the area under the workbenches so I can wash the dirty foot traffic into the drain or leave concrete flat and level under the work benches?

Trowel the concrete very smooth and then paint it on the whole building, or do a rougher broom finish inside the walk in door and in front of the work benches?

Thanks for all the help and ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The only thing that will mess with jacks is your floor drain itself. Couple things to think about. Will your workbenches all be along the wall or will you have a work area with benches "freestanding" away from the wall? Do you have any machine tools that need a level surface? Most likely you will need to shim anything that needs to be level anyway.

If you aren't washing anything I don't think you would gain much by sloping everything. And it is much easier to go for flat concrete than to try get a slope to be consistent.

If you are looking at it primarily for a semi or tractor snowblower type stuff I would be tempted to put the drain more to one side. I know in our case we have several long term projects that always take longer than projected. With the drain in the middle it means the long term stuff needs to be mobile or parked where the drain isn't. If it were off to the side I think we would have more useable space. Combines probably warrant a wider sloped area but squeegees work pretty good for any escapes.

If you are doing lots of wheel/ball joint/brake work I would plan a spot for a lift. Cheap to prep for before you pour. Looking at adding one now and with a sloped floor and floor heat to boot it makes it more difficult. I'm fairly young but getting up and down from the creeper or mechanic seat all day to grab different tools gets old.
My shop is not real large, so was thinking about a small fixed work bench area and then a series of mobile work benches and rolling tool boxes.

It seems that every shop has that one slow project that is awaiting parts and in the way.

I don't plan to pull motors or transmissions or do any ball joint/suspension work. Maybe 1x per year for new brake pads/rotors on a pickup truck. Mainly tires and oil changes for my vehicle service work. I did look into a 4 post lift and actually tried to lay it out in my 40x100 building and it takes up a lot of room. Part of me thinks they would be great, and the other part says waste of space. I am mainly looking for a shop for service of combines, sprayer, tractors, grain trucks and trailers, augers, etc. Not so much vehicle repair. And possibly leave my snow removal tractor in so it is warm and ready to go.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Any way to effectively use the high up space in farm shops that are too narrow for a mezzanine? I only have 6' each side of the overhead door and the walls are 20' high. Lots of wasted space above the work bench, drill press, tire machine, welder, etc. Would pallet racking work and a tall rolling ladder like you see in big stores?

Or do the high up areas just become junk collectors and never get emptied. Seems like a waste of the 12' of space above working height along each wall.
 

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My shop is not real large, so was thinking about a small fixed work bench area and then a series of mobile work benches and rolling tool boxes.

It seems that every shop has that one slow project that is awaiting parts and in the way.

I don't plan to pull motors or transmissions or do any ball joint/suspension work. Maybe 1x per year for new brake pads/rotors on a pickup truck. Mainly tires and oil changes for my vehicle service work. I did look into a 4 post lift and actually tried to lay it out in my 40x100 building and it takes up a lot of room. Part of me thinks they would be great, and the other part says waste of space. I am mainly looking for a shop for service of combines, sprayer, tractors, grain trucks and trailers, augers, etc. Not so much vehicle repair. And possibly leave my snow removal tractor in so it is warm and ready to go.
Just buy one of those movable 2 post lefts if you want one. Are slopes have never bothered us yet. I think we have 2in every 10ft down the Center Outside 10ft where bench’s and cabinetry sets is flat on one side. One thing to keep in mind is run drains to within 10ft of overhead doors. There’s a lot of water comes in when you get a heavy rain hitting a big door.
 

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Just built 42x60 this spring put 20 ft udrain in middle sloped the whole floor to it at 1 inch per 10 feet u can hardly notice the slope for working other than fabricating and just need a little shim sometimes. Definitely slope right to walls pressure washed whole shop floor this summer never touched a squeegee
 

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Glad to know that the slope is not bothering with jacking things up. Was hoping to throw 4 jacks under and lift the whole truck for tire rotations.

Slope the area under the workbenches so I can wash the dirty foot traffic into the drain or leave concrete flat and level under the work benches?

Trowel the concrete very smooth and then paint it on the whole building, or do a rougher broom finish inside the walk in door and in front of the work benches?

Thanks for all the help and ideas.
We polished the whole floor. Easy to wash, and on a windy day we will open the door at each end and use a leaf blower to get dust out.
 

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We put up a 50x100 shop with a 60ft u drain. On the advice of the cement guy ,we sloped it all (2" on 25ft). You don't notice the slope walking across it. It's new so i haven't done any jacking etc but I don't think it will be a problem.
 

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Don't think about having a flat floor!!! Especially if you live where there's any snow ever. My dad has a "flat" floor but it's still not flat enough to fabricate on so you need shims anyways. And water puddles by the walk in door and the walls. Not cool!! My boss has a sloped floor and I never think about it when jacking. But each to his own I guess...
 

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One thing to keep in mind is run drains to within 10ft of overhead doors. There’s a lot of water comes in when you get a heavy rain hitting a big door.
One neighbour has a piece of 2-7/8” pipe laid in the concrete right under where the overhead door sits. It maybe sits 3/4” above the floor. The concrete on the outside of the door is sloped away from the door and he has nearly no water end up inside.
Our shop floor is sloped all the way to the edge of the pad and yes, there is a fair bit of water that comes under the door when it’s windy out.
 

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Dan do you know what slope you used for your floor? Did you use a u drain or sump pit? Do you feel the slope has affected you when doing mechanical work or fabricating? I know from your posts you fix a lot of equipment and do some fabricating. We are wondering as well if we should leave some flat area in our shop we are building or slope all the floors. It looks like from the floors we have looked at a slope of 1/8 in per foot is the most slope you would want to put in. One floor we looked at had a 1/4 inch per foot and the mechanics said it is too much.
 

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Dan do you know what slope you used for your floor? Did you use a u drain or sump pit? Do you feel the slope has affected you when doing mechanical work or fabricating? I know from your posts you fix a lot of equipment and do some fabricating. We are wondering as well if we should leave some flat area in our shop we are building or slope all the floors. It looks like from the floors we have looked at a slope of 1/8 in per foot is the most slope you would want to put in. One floor we looked at had a 1/4 inch per foot and the mechanics said it is too much.
Sorry I missed this Southern.

I have a flat spot which is nice for working on until you park a snow covered unit and the water covers 2/3 of the flat area before it flows towards the sloped area. I checked my sloped area and there’s about 1.25” in 4’ so just over 1/4”per foot. I currently have a tractor split on the sloped area and it was perfectly fine. I had it setup so I was rolling the front away square to the slope. If you were rolling it up or down the slope that would be difficult. The water drains off it fine and I’ve built 21’ hopper bin skids on it and just had to shim them to get it flat as they straddled the sump.

I use an overhead gantry crane and if the floor is freshly swept it can be fun to maneuver by yourself and it will freewheel.

I wouldn’t build too big of an area flat unless you won’t be parking snow covered units on it. Maybe 1/8” per foot would work too. I have a sump about 18” wide and 20’ long with catwalk material over it. Works good except some creeper wheels are small enough they get caught in it.
 
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