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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was born and raised on a small farm in central Kansas. I remember my dad talking about cracks in the concrete around our grain bins. Is this still a problem today? I developed a two part epoxy based mortar paste and I wondered if marketing it to repair the cracks in bins would be a good market. If the response here is positive I will start trying to meet with local farms here in Missouri where we live to show the product.

I welcome any and all comments and help or insight you all can give me concerning this.
Thank you
Dennis
 

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Probably have a better chance of selling Mono Foam to a plumber to fill in his butt crack.
 

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We use Flex-N-Seal to seal our grain bins and we normally put it on the cracks on the concrete pad beside the wall as well. I hate to see water going into those cracks before winter. Last time we did it, i was wondering if an epoxy base mortar would not be better and stronger on bigger bins. I got a product ("Sabatack 750") recommended, which gets used for sealing huge tanks all over the world. It should be way stronger and stays flexible as well. Unfortunately i could not find some in Canada, but i heard it gets sold in the US.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
We are now supplying some of the MFA farm supply stores in the Midwest. We found through market research that a big portion of the customers purchasing our product was repairing feeders and water tanks and having very good results.
Thanks to all of you for the feedback including the filling the plumbers butt crack. lol
 

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I was born and raised on a small farm in central Kansas. I remember my dad talking about cracks in the concrete around our grain bins. Is this still a problem today? I developed a two part epoxy based mortar paste and I wondered if marketing it to repair the cracks in bins would be a good market. If the response here is positive I will start trying to meet with local farms here in Missouri where we live to show the product.

I welcome any and all comments and help or insight you all can give me concerning this.
Thank you
Dennis
Need some advice on how to handle a situation, so mistakes are not repeated.... Timeline... Put up two 15K bu bins in October, concrete had been poured about two weeks before bins were set up, we began filling as soon as the 1st bin was finished. There was about 3 weeks from the time the concrete was poured until the 1st bin was filled completely, (mounded up in the center). A couple of weeks ago we had some pretty hard freezes around here (Southern Middle Tennessee). Toward the end of the cold spell is when I noticed the cracks forming. The location of the bins required that we dig down for the left bin and put down about 1 to 4 feet of fill dirt under the right bin. At first I thought it was a packing problem and we did not pack it well enough and the ground was settling. The right bin is the one that has the most severe cracking problem, but now the left bin is cracking too. My question is there one thing that jumps out that caused the concrete to break, or is it a chain of events that let up to it, or a bad batch of concrete? It appears that the footer each bin is sitting on is still intact, but the pad is starting to crack severely around the edge of each footer. Any feedback would be greatly appreciated. Thanks,
 

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What was the strength of the concrete, thickness of the slab, and what size of rebar and how much was put in? Freezing at 3 weeks is not going to do much. You will not have full strength of the concrete till it has cured for 4 weeks. Freezing after the first week after the pour likely will not hurt it much but it will not cure very well when it is frozen which means it will likely take longer to reach its full strength. When you say you added fill was that dirt or gravel and how was it packed?
 

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I believe in 72 hours it’s at 50% strength and at 2-3 weeks it’s at almost 100%. Rebar and base work is key to getting good concrete. Big flat bins don’t actually put that much force down on ground when you figure out square inches of surface area with total loaded weights of bins.
 

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A uniform base is very important. All the earth should be removed to at least the elevation of the lowest point, and preferably 1 1/2 the times of the depth of the slab then new fill well compacted added to get to the desired elevation.
 

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Something tells me we've been trolled by a spammer. He copied the entire post from another forum. Sigh. And now this user has posted to another part of this forum a very different message. The spammers are getting a little harder to detect. This one was very nearly on topic, and passed the farmer test, but I think he must have copied the post from somewhere else.
 

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Something tells me we've been trolled by a spammer. He copied the entire post from another forum. Sigh. And now this user has posted to another part of this forum a very different message. The spammers are getting a little harder to detect. This one was very nearly on topic, and passed the farmer test, but I think he must have copied the post from somewhere else.
A 10 year old post from another forum copied verbatim.
 

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I cant believe you guys tracked that down. The forum has been a great place to get help and provide help. Unfortunatley there seems to be a lot of fake farmers or cleaver marketers that seem to want to get on this site. Obviously with our internal FBI service they will not get very far if they slip through the cracks. Keep up the good work.
 
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