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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a early R52 with the short sieves-tough time keeping corn in machine on side hills.Try to keep top sieve as open as possible but if you go to far you just plug in up.Tried adjusting rotor every way possible but you still chew up the cobs and then plug sieve.
Any thoughts out there?
 

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Helical bars need to be in good shape and even a small mod to help keep from refeeding over the concave by adding a short helical just above the feed chain inlet. I run four reverse bars to control rotor loss (two minimum on discharge end and maybe two more in the center 90 degrees to the first two) and have every other wire pulled from the concave rear section and sep grate. Run cyl speed between 250 and 320 rpm. Run concave at "12" or 3/4" clearance and with front section at "mid" adjustment. I have my lower sieve in the lowest factory holes in front and raised up at the rear as far as I can (and have drilled new rear mtg holes and moved up the allen bolts at the midway position) and blocked the space between the bottom of the sieve and the grain pan with belting or foam rubber to keep grain from running over into the tailings as easily and to force more air up thru the sieve and chaffer. Four inch taller chaffer dividers that extend onto the grain pan are a must on sidehills ( left lean better than right lean and AGCO has a kit for this) and I have added a "slide" to the tailings elevator outlet to return anything to the center of the sieve instead of the RH side. In corn try and run the lower sieve clear open to start and adjust the chaffer (long finger 1 5/8" SQUARE tip is best) to get your sample close to what you want and then begin to close the lower sieve. The chaffer needs to have the front 8 rows independent of the rest of the chaffer and run it 1/8" to 1/4" wider than the rest of the chaffer. I first did a chaffer like this in the Fall ( on an N-6)of 1981 and have done probably 100 or more since then...it works. Engine speed needs to be at the top of recomended rpms. remember this model is what I call a 1200 BPH corn machine on level land if corn is 20% or less .....sidehills will suffer some.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info-new to rotory combines-what do you mean by reversing the helical bars,also about the one above the feed chain -is this at 90* degrees as well?.Will changing the chaffer not let it plug up more easily,thats one of my problems now?
I appreciate any info
Thanks
Gord
 

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Reverse cylinder bars, not helical bars......it's in your operation/owners manual. The rasp teeth are backwards compared to the other (forward) bars. Changing the chaffer to the front 8 rows independent allows you to open them wider (never more than 3/4" !!) and keep the rear 2/3 of the rows more closed to help keep them from plugging. The extra helical bar just above the rear feed chain is an additional improvement to what it was from the factory.
 

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don't forget to check the accellerator rolls - if they are worn, especially on the rh side under grate, nothing will keep grain in the shoe as the air blast will blow the corn almost to the end of the shoe.
 

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I'd agree with drallis, sidehill kit is a must in sidehills, also accellerator rolls need to be in tip top condition for maximum perfomance!!
 

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my best luck has been with a round end corn chaffer in corn over 20% and close down UNTIL cob chunks stop getting stuck in it may have to turn air down to keep from blowing it out but it will work.leave sieve open and clean it with chaffer to keep it from returning to much cornand overloading right side of shor
 

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What do you guys suggest to help him prevent breaking the cob. Some areas of corn and beans run with just 1/2 the cylinder bars installed all the way accross. Would he be smart to remove 1/2 of the bars next to discharge? If that helps he could expand from there. Of course it would help to extend rasp bars closer to discharge while shortening discharge paddles. I don't know what you can get away with on the short rotor but I would work at reducing cob breakage. You might find you don't need the reverse bars if you eliminate some bars and maybe even us come up with a steggered two bolt bar setup on seperator side. Anyone tuned there rotor to reduce the broken cob thus dramatically reducing load on the shoe?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the info from everyone-I have ordered new accellerator rolls,changed my corn chaffer to open the front 8 rows independently-but does any one have a part # for a sidehill kit-not in my book?
 

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DAN, we keep forgetting not all machines have been upgraded, YES please notice if you can see the discharge paddles from the cage back. IF so then you have the long paddles. All early p3's in all Gleaners had discharge paddles that were longer than the discharge area. Paddles need to be same size as the discharge area. 71385640 paddles are 8.84" long and require extended bars to close the gap 71378577 are the forward long bars. Lowen MFg used to offer a short paddle with a piece of cylinder bar made on it. We made our own for years before anyone picked up on it. Dan invented this idea on the 62's - we made them for the smaller rotor on the 50's and ir had just as much improvement on material flow and less cob break up.
 

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I have been spending nights in the cage inserting plastic plugs in the holes left from last year when I removed every other wire. I found the straw tended to plug the grate with the holes open. Last year I also tried experimenting with half the bars off the rotor over the separator and it helped reduce broken cobs so now I plan on cutting the thrasher bars off where they extend into the separator. Last year I added helix bars into the discharge and filled in the open space on the top of the cage with helix bars. I plan on installing new chopper blades and noticed they are worn more on the right side of the discharge. I think the changes have helped but I did have a little rotor loss so I have one of the "corn rings" to install this year. Any other suggestions?
 

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Looks like you have mostly black iron non chromed helicals. Are they as worn as they appear in pictures? Looks like you have a chrome one near discharge to compare with. Don't know how badly worn helicals will treat you in corn but they could kill machine in tough to convey straws.
 
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