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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any help appreciated.

I have run TR series from TR95 and up - know them inside and out and they are very easy to work on.

I purchased a gleaner R75 2005 as the new series New Holland did not apprear as friendly on maintenance and repairs as TR99

Gleaner simplicity attracted me ... BUT can someone tell me trick to checking rotor gear box oil level... I can t even get to it.. I can see it with my flash light and i stand on platform but that still leaves me to far and its **** near burried back there - book says check every season // keep above elbow... etc only it doesnt show how to check.

TR s i checked weekley because ... well it was easy ...

Also - rotor high and low range?? How do i change ( i see the lever) but when machine off? or running? seperator engaged or not... Also why is there is there a high and low range?

Finally i have this 10 foot bar that is attached to clean grain elevator - i m assuming its a tool for something but i have no clue nor does book show...

any comments appreaciated
 

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Gear box oil level is fun I admit. We put a site glass in ours to make checking easier.

Hi/lo range is selected with machine NOT engaged. Made easier by moving rotor drive belt slightly with one hand while moving lever at same time with other. Don't force it. Will move from hi - neutral - low and vice versa. You'll feel the detents but also you can remove inspection plate to see if rotor is moving or in neutral if your not sure. The hi/lo range is needed for various crops depending on what your thrashing. The max rpm in low range is somewhere under 500 rpm I think, where in high range it runs close to 1000. Again what are you thrashing...all of what we do is in high range - wheat barley canola, but will try fabas in low.

ALSO if the machine should plug then open up the concave, go from high to low, and the machine will usually take it through

The bar is there to assist with the opening of thrasher door (rock trap)...if that is the bar I am thinking of. Should be decal there detailing the use of the bar.

Hope you enjoy the Gleaner
 

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For the oil level look up at the gear box, there is a plug in the top, the elbow on the side, and a plug in the bottom. Wouldn't hurt to change that oil starting off, drain it and then fill back up until it comes out the elbow on the side.

Low speed is for crops like corn and beans that require rotor speed lower than 500 or so where as high range is for most small grains. To shift ranges pull or push on the lever and while your on it wobble the rotor drive belt an inch or two one way or the other and you will feel the gear switch and the lever will move.

The long wrench is mainly for cleaning the crap off your casecade pan in the front of the shoe, after a season or a couple rains on the combine chaff and crop material builds up there and forms solid chunks, keep it clean for better performance.

Good luck with your combine, you got a good one and I'm sure you will like the switch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you very much for the replies guys.

Appreciated - will be running mostly in high range as canola, oats, wheat, barley are the norm.

Taking small steps - still running one TR side by side - if all works out will consolidate to gleaner for ease of parts and servicing. Minus gear box i m impressed that most of what i need to do is at ground level - motor access best on market

Will post once we finally get going and the rain stops....
 

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dgd, you have to send the young, skinny, wirery guy, that thinks it is an adventure, to check the gearbox oil. A 1/2 inch wrench to take the plug out of the elbow, then we stick a white plastic tie in the as a dipstick, to check it. Like the other post said, it is good advice to always peek in ahead of the sieves every night or in the morning and bust loose any buildup ahead of the sieves. Please check the condition of your accelerator rolls before you go to the field. Very important to making your machine perform, open up the door in the engine compartment and if you can stick a pencil through the rolls, the lugs need replaced. We ran a N5 and Dad ran a TR96 for years. I traded for a R62, and a little over a year later Dad traded for an R65. He is a proud man and I know having his son's outperform him in the wheat field, was why he traded. We have since moved up to an R65 too, you will like you machine!
 
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