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Re: tips for older machines

Quote:I've been around since the 1480 series and have learned a few things. Up front, don't neglect the feeder drum bearings(this is a fire maker and then some). Next, check the guide rails for wear, an easy fix is to weld angle iron in. The cast feeder house retaining blocks can crack so check them!! On newer machines with electric feeder reverse, spend the money and put the hydralic on(you won't regret it). On to the transition; if the vanes are wore out so is it. Drill a small hole in the right side in front of the first vane to check it's thickness. If you see wear patterns by the vane holes it is shot. Next, the rotor. Any time you pull it, put new bolts and bushing in the hub on back. And yes, rotors will eventually wear out. Don't fret over a cracked support block on the augers cause they will be wore out when the augers shafts are. Shoes on old machines are a problem; bushings and bolts and bearings, but a trick paint the bushing after installing and the will last longer. If a 2188 or 2388 with the old needle bearings in the channel support upgrade to the heavier cast model. In 21 and 2388s the clean grain system is HIGH wear items. The boot transition, band, flange and auger should all be chrome or at least hard surfaced. 21 & 23's also wear prematurely on the inside of the clean elevator below the bearing support(especially in soybeans). Bubble up augers mainly wear from load, so if you have an extension put a lift auger in(I can tell you where to plumb one on 2388, just send me a message). Return systems are quite reliable. And take them covers off your spreader gear(unless you like trash and fires).
Now, to optimize a 21 or 23 simple. Put a specialty rotor in (if you don't have one already). A set of Gordon bars will increase thru-put dramaticlly. For the shoe in small grains and sunflowers I recommend an airfoil chaffer (I built my own, but the after market ones are good). Add a washer to the slip clutch bolts on the clean grain drive to increase carrying capacities. 2188s can gain alot just by increasing the high idle setting (about 70-80 rpms turns them into an animal). And last , to handle the extra thru-put is the front of the chaffer. In 200+ bushel corn you can and will fill the fan full of corn. To stop this , I built a deflector 4" tall bent at just shy of 45 degrees and bolted it to the front of the chaffer frame. If you overflow that, well you have some awfully good corn.
I will post tips from time to time and hopefully remember them since I am now in the 8010 realm and none of this applies to it.


Would sure like to see a pic of that homemade chaffer.

If your feeder drum is in good condition other than a worn chain channel, you can have a band rolled and installed, then chucked in a lathe and trued. It will more than double the life of the drum and quiet the noise form the cross bars hitting the drum when feeding heavy material.

Dont put cheap bolts in the rotor hub. Make sure they are USA or equivelent made grade 8s of the proper length.

Agreed on the Gorden bars. Amazing what a different machine they make. I also run helical concaves with no wires in small seeds.

To add to your list, I found that the center bearing on the hex cross shaft that drives the shaker system, needs to be realigned. It is assembled at the factory without ever having a loaded hopper. Once you run a few tanks, the entire superstructure settles to its more permanent position and that bearing is then out of alignment. It puts a lot of stress on the shaft. A quick loosening of the bolts so the bearing can center itself, and then retightening, is all it takes.

Also look on the backside of the clean grain elevator shielding inside the grain tank. The roller chain that drives it can, if let run loose or running a worn chain, wear a hole in the tinwork and allow small grains to leak. Use a mirror to look back there, dont just feel around with your hand unless you have a lot of bandaids handy.:-(
 

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Re: tips for older machines

+1 for posting very good stuff!!!

This is one of the reasons a forum like this one is so important - to learn from each others experience!
(and mistakes...
)

- Peter
 

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Re: tips for older machines

Our 2188 has a mechanical fuel pump. A half a turn on it made the biggest difference. Also the 500# spring in the rotor belt tensioner.
 

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Re: tips for older machines

Also, when done for the year move the shaker/sieve mechanism to the middle of its stroke. Will remove stress from shaker bushings, seem to last a little longer.
 
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