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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So we decided to get ambitious this year and rebuild everything in the threshing system. It is worn down, tore up, and just not good. First, we pulled the rotor. We are installing gorden bars and cover plates. We are also installing kile rotor flights. All the transition cone and transport vanes are being replaced. In all honesty, the cone itself needs replaced because there are holes wearing though the cone that we are just gonna patch up. Also replacing the front concave because it looks like a couple of rocks have gone through the combine which they have because the rotor impeller is bent from hitting one a couple seasons ago. Will also be replaced.

However, we are not replacing separator or helical bars. They are regular bars and not chrome, so should I weld a few beads on the leading edge and grind down to a sharp corner like originals? Has anybody else done this?

Also, we have slotted separating grates. How are those tuned with the channel pieces that can bolt on in multiple ways. They can be inside, outside, and in 2 different locations on the grate. There are 9 of them I think.

Lastly, how should I adjust vanes? The gorden bars take up the first half of the rotor. Do they need to be adjusted to be aggressive since gorden bars tend to move material faster? I don't remember if the back ones are adjustable, but do they need to be less aggressive to make sure seed is separated out adequately?


Oh and its a 1460 combine. We harvest corn, beans, wheat and milo. We would ahve put disrupters, but they require spike bars and we bale the straw.

THanks!
 

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Specialty rotor or standard rotor? I assume standard as you mention welding on the bars. Welding would be a tough thing to justify when the new bars are not that much money in comparison. Ask an A&I dealer for a price and also look at aftermarket from other places that sell red parts.

Slotted grates. Inside, bolted leaving slots wide open gets the most out of the rotor. Bolted in center of slots, reduces material volume. Outside leaving slot open, does not retard material and reduces agitation of material, but allows easy stuff to fall out. Outside in center of holes reduces material release the most.

Adjust the vanes over the concaves by loosening the bolts, moving the vane, then tightening the bolts. You can see with the rotor out how they work. They actually make a special bolt for the vanes how that makes moving them easier. Not sure if the 1460 has the vane bolts or not.

Vanes over the grates is not fun. You have to unbolt the cover to get to them and it takes a skinny, agile person to work in the limited space.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Specialty rotor or standard rotor? I assume standard as you mention welding on the bars. Welding would be a tough thing to justify when the new bars are not that much money in comparison. Ask an A&I dealer for a price and also look at aftermarket from other places that sell red parts.

Slotted grates. Inside, bolted leaving slots wide open gets the most out of the rotor. Bolted in center of slots, reduces material volume. Outside leaving slot open, does not retard material and reduces agitation of material, but allows easy stuff to fall out. Outside in center of holes reduces material release the most.

Adjust the vanes over the concaves by loosening the bolts, moving the vane, then tightening the bolts. You can see with the rotor out how they work. They actually make a special bolt for the vanes how that makes moving them easier. Not sure if the 1460 has the vane bolts or not.

Vanes over the grates is not fun. You have to unbolt the cover to get to them and it takes a skinny, agile person to work in the limited space.
No its a specialty rotor. Everything is way more expensive. Its almist another 1000 to replace the remaining 6 seperator bars and 3 helical kcikers. Should i just leave them be? It kinda looks like new ones come rounded.

Thanks for the settings. Thats basically what im looking for. However, how do the vanes need adjusted as far as aggressiveness? It looks like the cone vanes cant be adjusted, hut im nt sure how aggressive all the others should be.

Thanks again
 

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I personally would not weld on rasp bars that are cast. Even though they may take a weld, they are sensitive even to the anchor bolt torque. The kickers can be worn and still provide good action as long as the chopper or beater is in good working order.

The vanes in the cone are fixed as they are under the most pressure. This is why you see the wear in the cone to be much worse than the cage and concaves. It is where the material "transitions" from linear to rotary or rotational.

IMO, from running a 1460, as the adjustable vanes are so blasted difficult to adjust and because the concave and grate area are nearly the only grain outlet vs. the 16xx series, you sort of have to make compromises. I would put them in slow and leave them there. IMO. In fact, for my crops and area, I had removed every other separator vane to slow the rearward flow of material for better separation. But that was with a standard rotor and in my climate conditions, which will vary from yours.
It took longer to get out the tools, remove the cover, put up the ladder, and move the vanes, than it would have to just adjust ground speed and cut height for that field to compensate for the vane position. But again, your mileage may vary.
 

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If your doing corn might as well put the vanes in slow position and leave them there, that's how the book said for them to be set and its the way they were when we got the machine. Figured in beans it would keep loss to a minimum and now with the aftermarket concaves in ours along with specialty rotor its going to be able to handle a lot more material then it could when it was right out of the factory. I don't do wheat but plan on it someday and don't see myself changing the vanes for that either.

I think I would end up changing grates though if I wanted the straw, they are the keystock ones with disruptors in and about every other row is spiked bars in back.

I agree that those vanes would be a pain to move.
 

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I would just remove the hub and inspect, then re-instal with the new bolts. Or, if the bushings are toast, buy a new hub.

I dont know about the 1460, but I have seen the bolts on the older hubs bend some, then half shear. So installing one at a time, might be difficult I would think.

Am I not seeing something right on that?
 

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It's been a few years since my old 1660 days very good machine I rebuilt it two times the bolts in the back of rotor as the guys have said one other thing just as important is the coupler and short shaft for the hydro pump ate the back of motor the splines wear out and you will only have trouble when you are driving hard in the mud I seen that movie before.
 
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