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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our 2188 is on its last season for the current rub bars. But for now I was wondering if I could use filler bars in the first concave to help with threshing barley and wheat. I would think the extra threshing time would help to get the seed out of the head a bit better and put less stress on the return.
Anyway, I don't think it will hurt to try the filler bars. Anybody want to suggest how many or what configuration I should try?
Thanks,
Don

P.S. After the season is over I'll be back on here asking about what type of rub bars to get (regular, gordon, etc.).
 

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your idea would help but you would loose capacity slightly but if your in the yard on a rainy day and can afford them this year i would replace them order borinized or extended wear bars if you plan on keeping the machine if not order whatevers cheapest
 

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You allready know about the Gorden bars and stock, etc. Have you seen the newest release from Kile Manufacturing? The 506?
http://www.kilemfg.com/1.html

You can replace just the thresh section of the rotor bars if you choose without compromising balance anymore than normal. Usually it seems that an average machine will go through 2 sets of thresh bars to each one of the seperator section bars.

As far as interuptor bars or filler bars, they do not increase the aggressive nature of the thresh, they do however, as you mention in your post, give more "time" of thresh. Maybe just the ticket for your situation, I dunno, but I'm glad you made the difference between a cover plate and the filler bars in your post.

I dont have enough experience with the filler bars to give any advice on placement other than if you have a few left over, put them under the tailings inlet. However Ron Kile, the maker of the Kile bars and other rotor performance goods, does use them. He is cutting wheat right now in his area of eastern WA state. You can call him and see how he has them configured. He also just got his AFX flights operational and is doing the initial R&D run right now. He said it shows great promise for those that use the AFX in extremely tough conditions and that the feeding of material into the afx is increased greatly. The wheat in that area seems to be running quite well for a change allthough the wind recently put it flat to the ground. This makes a real challenge for the machine and he and the neighbors are finding out just where the weak spots are in the machines this year.
 
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