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My roller mill died and I am looking at a Renn or Sven 24" long pto roller mill. The Renn has 16" diameter rolls that sit horizontal and the Sven roller mill has 11" diameter rolls and the 1 roller sits lower than the other. Both the same price. The 16" rolls should last longer before a regroove as they have a much larger surface area.

Wondering about the capacity feeding barley. Renn claims the larger rolls suck in barley better and have the MUCH higher bushels per hour and Apollo who makes the Sven roller mill claims that their offset roll design is the MUCH higher capacity.

Any real world users? Both claim 500 bushels per hour of barley. That capacity would be nice it if was indeed true.
 

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Can't comment specifically on either, have been around Renn and Farmking in the past, IMO of the two, Renn was the better. Myself I got some huge older one that was built in Ontario called a Fastcut. Can't recall exactly how large diameter the rolls are, but they are all of 16" or more and it is about 30 inches plus wide. And has smooth rolls...and no not that they are wore down, they were smooth from new. Just from how it is built pretty sure it originated in a feedmill and is of industrial intent, and while I can't compare it to others and I have never really cared enough to test it for max cap, with those large smooth rolls running at about 700RPM(which is fast by industry standards in feet per minute, but where it runs smooth) she packs it away, more so with oats than barley, and moisture effects both. IMO simply based on physics, the larger the rollers, the better a mill will feed under most circumstances. Also things like moisture, kernel size, and more have huge effect, so I would take any claimed capacity with a grain of salt.
I have seen that offset idea in those rollers, and really IMO you still have the same contact area between them as with ones that are on the same plane horizontally, but do they turn at the same speed or does one turn faster?...I seem to recall someone made one that was set up to drive like that, idea was you got some tearing action as well as the crush of the rolls.

Not sure about anyone else but I'm sure there is, locally Barrhead Machine is very well respected for remanufacturing or regrooving rollers, even when broke thru they can fix them for less than a new machine.

https://www.bmwltd.ca/
 

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Have both, a smaller 6 inch sven on electric, and a larger pto renn. though both rollers are relatively serviceable, I prefer the renn. 4 bolts with an impact and the roller is out. It would be pushing it to say 500 bushels an hour. Bigger is not necessarily better, the small electric mill on a timer or pressure sensors feeding into a hopper for a couple hours is just as effective as running a tractor to do the same in 15 mins. just redid my rollers on the renn, new 1/2 in skins and grooves....1700 bucks. I think it was 700 just to get them regrooved last time.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Also curious...

Also what do you mean by died?
I have a little electric mill now with pencil augers, surge tank and wooden overhead bins to fill my feed wagon. It is 40-50 years old and the wooden structures are rotten and ready to fall over, the electric switches and augers keep breaking or failing. Right now it is a switch that is obsolete. Will hobble it together to finish this year, but want to switch to steel hopper bin for next year. Was thinking of getting rid of the cows in 5 years, so thinking the pto mill would be easier to sell than redoing the old electric mill. I have a few small steel hopper bins that are too small for the grain side of the farm and a bunch of old 6 and 7" augers that dont get used anymore, so it should be easy to adapt a pto mill to my program.

Only need to roll about 5000 bushels of barley a year.
 
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