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Yes some die shortly after they retire..That means they waited to long to quit..NO retirement..That means for all not just farmers..Know a fellow who has no issues with money, retired now his wife is sick, can't travel or sweet tweet all ..they have No retirement either..
Make decisions to make sure there will be no regrets..Lots of our relates retired early and spend most of the time travelling the world..
 

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One thing people need to consider is you may not feel like you do at 50 when you are 70, then travelling becomes less of a priority and you seem to hunker down near a hospital. My parents barely travel anymore. Vegas a couple times a year then they miss their house and grandkids and run back home to sit in the -30 January weather. No way I will be sitting in Sask in Jan/Feb when I am a bit older.
 

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Well if at all possible I'll die with my boots on and hopefully they'll be full of cowshit too, but dam I want it during the daylight, and it better be sunny too lol.
I just rented a neighbors pasture last week from his nephew that is taking over. Neighbor is an 80 some year old bachelor. Last summer I went to his place on an ambulance assist and figured that was the end, laying on his garage floor conscious and not making sense with a blood sugar of 12, that is coma territory. He has recovered but will live out his days in a nursing home. Told the nephew you guys should have let me die on that floor. Nephew broke the news to him about having to get rid of the cows and he said if I can't have cows or take care of them I just as well be dead. I don't expect him to live much longer.

I'll never retire. May end up working for the kids in season but a guy has to do something, may as well be something you love.

That said I love the pig work to but I am **** sure not sorting and loading pigs in my 80's.
 

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Who are we to judge what makes others happy?
Really I’m just doing the same thing I have all my farming life, just on a smaller scale and much more focused. That not only makes me happy I’m thrilled by it.

We have no idea what will or will not make any individual happy. While too young Bruce died and went exactly as he had stated he would like too, working to the end (literally) no lingering, no burdening anyone.

Over the last few years I’ve had several close relatives and friends die and while people often discuss the “right” way to go to those left there is no right way.
It’s not like we have a choice in timing.
 

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Be nice in 20 years to be able to go South for 2-3 months. Got to have an ocean near by since I love to fish. In a perfect world own a little cc boat and take friends out fishing when they come down. Or just me And the wife. MAybe a little sleepy Mexican fishing town. Los Burris comes to mind.
I guess we can all dream can’t we?
 
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Judging what should make someone else happy is one of the world's top past times. Even the idea of retiring is seen as the only acceptable goal in life by many people. Who says you really need to retire. If you like what you are doing then it is not necessary. Is it necessary to retire from sitting on a beach after 35 years? Actually it probably is. I need more to do than that.
I too look to get home after 2 weeks away. Mainly because I get bored and need a "home" to feel part of the environment. A warm destination with a house, car, garage and basic tools to tinker when needed and I could be comfortable. Otherwise I am just a passerby and while it is nice to see new places I get more satisfaction from being part of that new environment. So endless travelling and never actually becoming established somewhere would be tiresome.

Maybe some farmers need a "vacation farm" in Brazil. Some acres with machinery and share owners who come down in the winter months to do exactly what they like doing but in a different environment, different machinery, crops and whole bunch more free time. Everyone meets for a beer when the sun goes down and figures out who is doing what tomorrow. Doing a little work, watching the work being done or completely off the plantation vacationing.
 

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Life would be a terrible place if we couldn’t!

You and my brother would get along, last year alone he fished Great Slave Lake in the summer and Lake Winnipeg ice fishing in the winter. Oh. Maybe not.
Well half of that sounds fun
 

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It always amazes me the time, money, thought, and effort that are put into "enjoying life" while at the same time few would give five minutes to thinking about what happens five seconds after you die. "For what shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul?" Mark 8:36
 

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I am semi retired, forced a bit early by my health and the passing of Jayne.
I kept my combine and header and harvest with the people (two different groups) that rent my land.
Having at least that much involvement helps keep me in the loop on cropping practices and technical developments.

I’ll hit the trough in May and decide year to year if I’ll contiue but I enjoy working with the energetic and very progressive thirty somethings, it reminds me of me 30 years ago and they seem to appreciate the harvest assistance.

Doubt many have picked my route, I elected to be more than just a warm body at harvest.

I’m not a big fan of being away from home for extended periods like others, always seems whenever I do when I get home from more than a few days away I realize there’s no place like home.

I don’t care about winter, the thermostat is at 21, same as summer.
I’m sure they are pleasantly surprised by this “old fella” in the field with all the tech gadgetry & knowledge oozing from the cab!

“21” !!!! Yikes ..... that’s freezing! Been mid to high 40’s here for a couple of weeks. Get on the plane & come over ...... don’t bring any coats or gloves. ?
 

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Judging what should make someone else happy is one of the world's top past times. Even the idea of retiring is seen as the only acceptable goal in life by many people. Who says you really need to retire. If you like what you are doing then it is not necessary. Is it necessary to retire from sitting on a beach after 35 years? Actually it probably is. I need more to do than that.
I too look to get home after 2 weeks away. Mainly because I get bored and need a "home" to feel part of the environment. A warm destination with a house, car, garage and basic tools to tinker when needed and I could be comfortable. Otherwise I am just a passerby and while it is nice to see new places I get more satisfaction from being part of that new environment. So endless travelling and never actually becoming established somewhere would be tiresome.


Maybe some farmers need a "vacation farm" in Brazil. Some acres with machinery and share owners who come down in the winter months to do exactly what they like doing but in a different environment, different machinery, crops and whole bunch more free time. Everyone meets for a beer when the sun goes down and figures out who is doing what tomorrow. Doing a little work, watching the work being done or completely off the plantation vacationing.
I used to think that I would just keep farming till I was 80. But at 68 my energy level is not what it used to be. It does not take much to keep me busy for a day any more. 2014 was my last year of putting in a crop and with the weather we have had since then, wet springs and snowy and late harvests, I don't miss that part at all. I can enjoy going and helping some friends for a day or a couple of weeks and leave all the financial, logistical details to them. I ran a 200 excavator this fall for 2 weeks pulling crowns and stacking big poplars. I told the owner there is probably nothing in this world I would rather be doing than the peace and quiet of being all alone in the middle of a section on a nice fall day and accomplishing something. This fall helping to get my grain dryer and handling system up and running, was a large part of the new buyer getting his crop off this fall. I found it very rewarding to hear the dry grain running down the spout for hundreds of hours this fall! I am enjoying that amount of hands and boots on the ground. It is personally rewarding to know that I have the knowledge and can still do the work and enjoy it. One of the most rewarding things is to be able to use the knowledge that I have accumulated in a life of farming and trucking and heavy equipment, to help someone else. As I say this, maybe that is what brings us all together on this forum. We all share some desire to be a part of something bigger than our life would be if we were just sitting alone somewhere. Each to his own. But that is what I find enjoyable. To not be under all the pressure to be personally responsible for all things, frees up my time to be doing what I enjoy and having fun doing that. If something does not get done today, oh well, I'll do it tomorrow.

We have family on Vancouver Island and 3 years ago bought a condo there, overlooking a marina. Never dreamed I would live in a city on the island!! I have about 2 cubic feet of storage space in total. That is too cramped for me. So being surrounded by boats, I bought an old 40' converted fishing boat that is moored in the ocean just 100 yards from the condo. It is a totally different world there but in many ways it is very familiar when I get into life there. I enjoy it not being as cold there and the rain does stop for a while most days. Most days I go down to the boat and am servicing, repairing, rebuilding, learning a new fishfinder or radar overlay, designing and installing a hydraulic system for the new bow thruster. I have met a lot of like minded guys from totally different walks of life but the boat world brings us all together and gives us all a commonality. I have made some good friends there. One of the regulars on a boat forum I follow a bit has a quote on his site that goes something like this "I am spending too much money on my boat and enjoying every cent of it!) The word "boat" is an acronym you know! Break Out Another Thousand!! I am planning to head out to the island in Feb to pull the boat out of the water and install a new Fernstrum keel cooler and temperature controller that I designed and built to hopefully end 40 years of inadequate cooling system. This project has pushed me and retirement allowed me the time to figure out that gpm coolant flow is determined by btu divided by 450 (for antifreeze) x delta T. Pretty cool for an old guy to be able dig into a problem and in this totally foreign world, come up with solutions. The one thing I miss most though is my shop!!! It is like working with one hand tied behind your back, to not have all the tools and materials I am used to. Really makes one appreciate what you have at home. And I realize that I do not want to be totally without that stuff. One of the questions in this thread was "should I build my $300,000 dream shop?" I am not saying that is wrong for you, but as your world of equipment and assets shrinks, your interests get more scattered( a boat at the coast), and your desire to work that hard diminishes, maybe a $100,000 shop and a boat or place in Arizona with the other $200,000 is a better fit for the future. I have heard guys that built their 10,000 sq ft dream shop say that just sweeping the floor is a huge job.

Quitting farming is not like ending a job where you give 2 weeks notice and on that day you gather your worldly possessions into a little box that fits under one arm. I am over 4 years now of steady work selling off 2 generations of equipment without having a auction that takes 10-15% of your money. Tax implications are huge and spreading that out over a longer time and being able to hands on manage it is important. Holding and marketing and hauling a years worth of grain when tax implications are right and markets are at a peak takes time. Well worth some extra time after official retirement. This last year I have spent an enormous amount of time trying to get all the stupid subdivision paperwork through, to be able to stay in my house that I have lived in most of my life. I bought a 5 1/2 ton track hoe to do some of my own approach work and septic work required for the subdivision. Just owning this hoe has opened the door to several little digging jobs. And more to come. There is lots you can do if you like that kind of challenge. Farmers are a pretty ambitious and innovative bunch that will never be bored!

In answer to the OP's question on whether your outlook changes between 50 and 70, it does!
 

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I used to think that I would just keep farming till I was 80. But at 68 my energy level is not what it used to be. It does not take much to keep me busy for a day any more. 2014 was my last year of putting in a crop and with the weather we have had since then, wet springs and snowy and late harvests, I don't miss that part at all. I can enjoy going and helping some friends for a day or a couple of weeks and leave all the financial, logistical details to them. I ran a 200 excavator this fall for 2 weeks pulling crowns and stacking big poplars. I told the owner there is probably nothing in this world I would rather be doing than the peace and quiet of being all alone in the middle of a section on a nice fall day and accomplishing something. This fall helping to get my grain dryer and handling system up and running, was a large part of the new buyer getting his crop off this fall. I found it very rewarding to hear the dry grain running down the spout for hundreds of hours this fall! I am enjoying that amount of hands and boots on the ground. It is personally rewarding to know that I have the knowledge and can still do the work and enjoy it. One of the most rewarding things is to be able to use the knowledge that I have accumulated in a life of farming and trucking and heavy equipment, to help someone else. As I say this, maybe that is what brings us all together on this forum. We all share some desire to be a part of something bigger than our life would be if we were just sitting alone somewhere. Each to his own. But that is what I find enjoyable. To not be under all the pressure to be personally responsible for all things, frees up my time to be doing what I enjoy and having fun doing that. If something does not get done today, oh well, I'll do it tomorrow.

We have family on Vancouver Island and 3 years ago bought a condo there, overlooking a marina. Never dreamed I would live in a city on the island!! I have about 2 cubic feet of storage space in total. That is too cramped for me. So being surrounded by boats, I bought an old 40' converted fishing boat that is moored in the ocean just 100 yards from the condo. It is a totally different world there but in many ways it is very familiar when I get into life there. I enjoy it not being as cold there and the rain does stop for a while most days. Most days I go down to the boat and am servicing, repairing, rebuilding, learning a new fishfinder or radar overlay, designing and installing a hydraulic system for the new bow thruster. I have met a lot of like minded guys from totally different walks of life but the boat world brings us all together and gives us all a commonality. I have made some good friends there. One of the regulars on a boat forum I follow a bit has a quote on his site that goes something like this "I am spending too much money on my boat and enjoying every cent of it!) The word "boat" is an acronym you know! Break Out Another Thousand!! I am planning to head out to the island in Feb to pull the boat out of the water and install a new Fernstrum keel cooler and temperature controller that I designed and built to hopefully end 40 years of inadequate cooling system. This project has pushed me and retirement allowed me the time to figure out that gpm coolant flow is determined by btu divided by 450 (for antifreeze) x delta T. Pretty cool for an old guy to be able dig into a problem and in this totally foreign world, come up with solutions. The one thing I miss most though is my shop!!! It is like working with one hand tied behind your back, to not have all the tools and materials I am used to. Really makes one appreciate what you have at home. And I realize that I do not want to be totally without that stuff. One of the questions in this thread was "should I build my $300,000 dream shop?" I am not saying that is wrong for you, but as your world of equipment and assets shrinks, your interests get more scattered( a boat at the coast), and your desire to work that hard diminishes, maybe a $100,000 shop and a boat or place in Arizona with the other $200,000 is a better fit for the future. I have heard guys that built their 10,000 sq ft dream shop say that just sweeping the floor is a huge job.

Quitting farming is not like ending a job where you give 2 weeks notice and on that day you gather your worldly possessions into a little box that fits under one arm. I am over 4 years now of steady work selling off 2 generations of equipment without having a auction that takes 10-15% of your money. Tax implications are huge and spreading that out over a longer time and being able to hands on manage it is important. Holding and marketing and hauling a years worth of grain when tax implications are right and markets are at a peak takes time. Well worth some extra time after official retirement. This last year I have spent an enormous amount of time trying to get all the stupid subdivision paperwork through, to be able to stay in my house that I have lived in most of my life. I bought a 5 1/2 ton track hoe to do some of my own approach work and septic work required for the subdivision. There is lots you can do if you like that kind of challenge. Farmers are a pretty ambitious and innovative bunch that will never be bored!

In answer to the OP's question on whether your outlook changes between 50 and 70, it does!
Perfect retirement except supporting BC. Hehe **** the greenies. Sounds like a great set up

I’m also told the two most happiest time in your boating life is
1. When you buy your first boat
2. When you sell your last boat

Someday I wish to start on number 1
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Transaxial;3309119. One of the questions in this thread was "should I build my $300 said:
Great feedback, only problem is $100,000 shop doesn't really build much around here anymore, and if I build I plan on using it for the farm for the next 15 to 25 years so it needs to be big enough for that time period. I find your comment about never seeing yourself as living in a condo in the city interesting, it is that type of change that concerns me, I believe in living now while I can but not at the expense on not at least planning for tomorrow in some fashion, and it sure makes it harder to plan for the future, if want to do something in the future that you cant imagine yourself doing at present. But I guess if you farm you better embrace uncertainty and just go for it.
 

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It always amazes me the time, money, thought, and effort that are put into "enjoying life" while at the same time few would give five minutes to thinking about what happens five seconds after you die. "For what shall it profit a man if he gain the whole world and lose his own soul?" Mark 8:36
That ones easy! We rot in a hole in the ground! So far there's no evidence to the contrary!
We are on this earth for only a short time. Be pretty d*mn silly not to enjoy it! :)
 

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Great discussion, applies to all of us eventually. Jordan Petersen sums it up "doing the same thing is easy, change is hard". That is how we all feel when decisions need to be made.
Personally, the desire is waning at 66, physically work is harder to do, and periods of stress is not fun at all. One comment from neighbor, "never been easier to farm, all the toys and technology, but near time to quit!" One has to dislike/desire something MORE than the FEAR/STRESS of change, then it will happen. It is stressful for either choice for me, hope one side wins eventually. Wives will determine change for some of us, "if wife not happy, NOBODY happy!" Good luck to all, been a good run so far. Never been a better time or place to be a live.
 

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Great feedback, only problem is $100,000 shop doesn't really build much around here anymore, and if I build I plan on using it for the farm for the next 15 to 25 years so it needs to be big enough for that time period. I find your comment about never seeing yourself as living in a condo in the city interesting, it is that type of change that concerns me, I believe in living now while I can but not at the expense on not at least planning for tomorrow in some fashion, and it sure makes it harder to plan for the future, if want to do something in the future that you cant imagine yourself doing at present. But I guess if you farm you better embrace uncertainty and just go for it.
I didn't catch the important part that you are 15-25 years away from retirement! Big difference! You will certainly use and enjoy a big modern shop for those years before retirement. It may be the difference between farming the 15 or the 25 years you mention. We all face the problem of getting our money out of what we have built through our career. No black and white answers. Some are fortunate and can transition ownership of what they have built to the next generation and continue to contribute to the operation as much as they feel they want while taking a living out. That allows the original owner to live out his time and gets the new generation on its feet without crippling them with debt. The new shop continues to serve the needs of all in the family farm scenario. It is hard to quit cold turkey and let go of everything if that is what your plan is. Like one of my options seems to be. Not my first choice. The bigger your farmyard, the fewer people will want or be able to buy it down the road.
 

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Maybe some farmers need a "vacation farm" in Brazil. Some acres with machinery and share owners who come down in the winter months to do exactly what they like doing but in a different environment, different machinery, crops and whole bunch more free time. Everyone meets for a beer when the sun goes down and figures out who is doing what tomorrow. Doing a little work, watching the work being done or completely off the plantation vacationing.

Would it be more fun picking stones in Brazil???!!!! lol I agree about how for some people, retirement is their reason for having a career and gauges their success. Really, retirement is a fairly new idea, at one time people worked until they were unable to do so, then still helped out where they could. My success won't be gauged by my retirement, but hopefully by being able to work alongside my children, if they choose to farm, for as long as I can, or as long as they will tolerate me!


I often think about dad, if my brother and I hadn't farmed, he could be living a great retirement now, and could have retired 5-10 years ago (he's 71 now). I told him I was sorry for wanting to farm, and he said this was what he wanted. Pretty much retired now but has his part of the farm and pretty much just swathes a bit now, as that is his favorite thing. He snowmobiles all winter, stays at his cabin or camper most of the summer, and still has a sense of purpose, even if only running for parts or giving advice. I thank my lucky stars for having a dad like him.
 

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The putter in your shop in the winter seems to be passe around here. Don't see too many doing it. Lots lock those bins and head to Mesa after xmas.

As for the wife, there is also a lot of guys around here too that never take their wife anywhere. They sit them in a $30k house on the farm and drive a few million dollars in equipment around the yard. Don't do that.
 
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