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I have read a few opinions about this in other threads but I wanted a little more specific information. We have ran s series combine from the beginning and at times we have been frustrated with rotor loss. We have never changed the reverse bar configuration. I just look in the r78 there is no rhyme or reason to where they are located. I am looking for some advice. All we harvest is cereal. Very heavy irrigated wheat and barley. To 20 bu dry land.
 

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Reserve bars are boat anchors, can't believe Gleaner hasn't figured this out, never worked with a snit on the N series, why stall the crop, Scott.
 

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We have two on the very right and side of the rotor and my grandpa swears its the best to have them there for a clean sample. We have 2 more on the far left of the rotor that I am pulling off tomorrow morning. We are cutting dry wheat with wet green stems yet and its laying on the ground. I am not loosing out the rotor so I am going to free up some HP.
 

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This will be my first Gleaner with reverse bars. I have to pull the rotor to install the AC conversion so will be removing reverse bars also. Do you also replace the bar opposite of reverse bar to get the proper balance?
 

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Do you also replace the bar opposite of reverse bar to get the proper balance?
If the bars are worn yes, if it is in a relatively new machine just buy forward bars and use the reverse bars as a doorstop. Thats about their only real use anyway.

As far as losses, the reverse bar doesnt encourage anymore seperation it just causes grinding of the straw which makes it more difficult for the kernals to seperate from the MOG.

If you REALLY want to tackle the excessive losses for your taste there are alot better ways of achieving that rather than using reverse bars. Such as removing the helicals on the removable door, then placing a F3 cylinder bar in the belly of the cage to create a tumbling effect. Thats ALOT better idea than trying to force the crop backwards. Just slow it up a little bit and add an extra tumble in the cage. It works wonders.
 

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I think one of the big wigs in Agco ordered to many reverse bars and if he doesn't use them up he will be sacked, only reason I can see why they use them.
My S67 I had no reverse bars and a rasp bar fitted up higher at 7 o'clock in the belly so that gravity can still do it's trick. if it's in the belly (6 o'clock) you are starting going uphill. I cut a bar up from the R70 and fitted it in the reverse pattern ( don't know whether the direction made a difference) .Thats my way of thinking anyhow.
I was very pleased with rotor loss. I kept the bar to put in the S78
 

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You have to FLOW the straw and keep it in a thin mat, grinding it over and over is not the answer! I have never tried the F2 bar in the belly, nor removed the helicals, the next step is going in soon, an idea Mike at PFP told me abought, can't say exactly but it might even work better. My S78 really done good after taking out the reverse bars, more free power and a lot less rotor loss. I will not say zero loss, that's impossible, Only a titty-tat can do dat!!!
 

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Gleaner-r76 I was having trouble last year with my 76 in rice getting all the grain separated from the straw when the straw got green and tough. I'm probably gonna rebuild the rotor before this year and install a sweep kit and remove the reverse bars. Are there any more suggestions you might have? Thought about shimming the bars? When you put your sweeps in how did you arrange them?
 

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Gleaner-r76 I was having trouble last year with my 76 in rice getting all the grain separated from the straw when the straw got green and tough. I'm probably gonna rebuild the rotor before this year and install a sweep kit and remove the reverse bars. Are there any more suggestions you might have? Thought about shimming the bars? When you put your sweeps in how did you arrange them?
On the R76 we had, I had the best results with no reverse bars, half inch spacers under all bars, chopper speed up kit and nine sunnybrook sweeps. It had three sweeps in each row on the separator end. also had to weld bracket that extended into the discharge abought 6 inches so the sweep would help feed the chopper more evenly. I didn't cut any rice, but I think this set-up would work. You want to keep the straw mat thin so it will separate, also I think the sweeps help tumble the straw a bit. The rotor is so smooth too, no rumble at all. If I were going to try another rotor it would be Mike's at PFP.
 

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Did you change your chopper or just speed up the stock one?
At first I spead up the stock one but I did put way bigger bolts that hold the blades on. Did fine but later I installed the smaller one from PFP. I think the smaller one gave it more through-put and never had anymore plugging on outside of cage.
 

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Id look into a PFP rotor, at the very least I'd add their bars and accell rolls.
Best thing you can do to eliminate rotor loss in small grains is get a PFP rotor IMO. Have ran a PFP rotor in a 77 against a gleaner rotor with no reverse bars and several different patterns of sweeps and it still cant be as smooth and as little rotor loss as a PFP. If you have an R series I think they are even better in comparison to the gleaner rotors. Have a PFP rotor in my R75 and R62 and wouldn't have it any other way.
 
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