The Combine Forum banner

1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Had the richardson sales guy stop in the yard this week and wants to know where we put their fertilizer, wanting to know the amounts for each acre, legal location. Wants to know where the soybean seed goes and canola seed.
Blamed it on being proactive for the government so they keep track where everything goes.
We do business with multiple retailers for Seed and fert, so I find it little too nosy for a company to know where I put their products, if the government wants to know I can understand but for a company like Richardson to stick their nose in my business I find it offensive. He should be happy I give them my business and not asking why I only booked half the amount of canola seed but too much fertilizer for canola.
Just my 2 cents, wondering what you guys think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,827 Posts
Interesting. My sales agronomist asked me about where fertilizer was going too. Didn't think much of it at the time since she'll be doing agronomy on many of those acres this year. I'll have to ask her about this. I know of no pending policies or talk of any pending policies where any government is going to demand to know this information in Canada. In the future, though, I think the fertilizer runoff situation might trigger regulation. Until then, though, I don't see a need to provide this information.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,465 Posts
I would tell them where I am going to put it, but they might not want to hear where.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,858 Posts
Wonder if this is about to become the norm, honestly I could see it happening really, if it does, wonder if there will be fertilizer cops like the Monsanto gestapo? Maybe they'll give out boots to go with the Roundup leather jackets when you pass the muster lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Ya, they have no idea the value of that data.
What is the value of that data? In number format please. Everyone always goes on and on about how valuable it is yet nobody can ever answer this question.

Richardson reps haven't asked us these questions but I find it kind of surprising how rude some of you guys are. Guy asks where the fertilizer he sold you is going and you tell him to go f*ck himself? Seems ridiculously harsh, you could just say no, that's what I do when someone asks me for something I don't want to give, works very well and rarely does anyone push the subject after.

I also highly doubt any of you constantly tell people to f-off like you insinuate you do on this site.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
What is the value of that data? In number format please. Everyone always goes on and on about how valuable it is yet nobody can ever answer this question.

Richardson reps haven't asked us these questions but I find it kind of surprising how rude some of you guys are. Guy asks where the fertilizer he sold you is going and you tell him to go f*ck himself? Seems ridiculously harsh, you could just say no, that's what I do when someone asks me for something I don't want to give, works very well and rarely does anyone push the subject after.

I also highly doubt any of you constantly tell people to f-off like you insinuate you do on this site.
I kind of agree Jcalder, maybe its a food company that Richardson supports wants this info! It s not that uncommon that companies like General Mills asks us for a report of products we use on our crops, after all they are buying the product and they have to satisfy there consumer interests. I have been doing this for years now and in return I get a bonus paid for the additional work involved for those delivered bushels. I dont see any thing wrong. That being said Richardson should not beat around the bush and just come out and say their reasons for the info.
This is probably just another step so the farmer , grain company and food processing company can facilitate a mutual partnership.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,934 Posts
Uh yes the evil big data.....just like the evil big data that compared the price member's were paying for canola and came up with a report on how we're getting royally ****** in Saskatchewan?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
172 Posts
What is the value of that data? In number format please. Everyone always goes on and on about how valuable it is yet nobody can ever answer this question.

Richardson reps haven't asked us these questions but I find it kind of surprising how rude some of you guys are. Guy asks where the fertilizer he sold you is going and you tell him to go f*ck himself? Seems ridiculously harsh, you could just say no, that's what I do when someone asks me for something I don't want to give, works very well and rarely does anyone push the subject after.

I also highly doubt any of you constantly tell people to f-off like you insinuate you do on this site.
depends on the day:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,645 Posts
I also highly doubt any of you constantly tell people to f-off like you insinuate you do on this site.
Well... I had two guys out trying to sell seed again last week and I told them I had it all booked up. Now keep in mind I know these two fairly well and the one guy said "so you're finally telling us to **** off nicely" I said its more like "**** off, please".

The fertilizer thing is going to tighten up more as we go. Here I have to have a manure plan for my hog barns with all fields listed with soil samples, slope, soil types, yield expectations, etc. Its plugged into a formula which spits out the maximum gallons that can be applied, which I'm always under anyway. Application records are to be provided on demand including what field were spread from what barn, air temp, wind direction, humidity, manure analysis, dates and times. All applicators must go to a two hour recert training yearly to ensure we know how to spread manure and abide by all rules, plus pay a recert fee. You are subject to a spot check while applying and you better have your application card with you and a copy of the manure plan at the site you are pumping.

They pick the low hanging fruit first then move up the tree, livestock guys were first because there are fewer of us, be ready when your time comes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,827 Posts
I agree it will tighten up. And justifiably so. No one can deny the damage fertilizer runoff is having on rivers and lakes in many regions, and to the gulf of Mexico. The problem always is that regulations don't take into account all the exceptions to the rule and the differing circumstance. For example, there's virtually no nutrient runoff from my farm, despite being on a real watershed, as no runoff from my fields will make it more than a hundred feet before the native prairie will take it all up.

And of course the cost of meeting the regulations has all sorts of negative side effects like you mention such as certification and training costs, which are largely ineffective. It's not a lost cause but we have to make sure we don't take the wrong side of the issue! In other words, we can't say all is well there is no problem when there clearly is in many geographies.

Sustainability is an interesting but fairly meaningless word, isn't it. On the one hand there's a lot of what we do that's definitely not sustainable (herbicide resistance). On the other hand it's become a buzzword that keeps people feeling good about themselves while nothing changes--witness the largely meaningless sustainability declarations the grain companies want us to sign. Yet very little of our modern economy is sustainable.

Personally I'm very interested in real sustainability as it pertains to farming, and it's worth a lively debate over. It's a bit hard when people who eat food but oppose agriculture start arguing, but it's also hard when we aren't willing to take honest hard looks at what we do.

Hmm, a start may be if we can convince the city people they need to return our nutrients to us, in a purified and applicable form of course.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
587 Posts
I agree it will tighten up. And justifiably so. No one can deny the damage fertilizer runoff is having on rivers and lakes in many regions, and to the gulf of Mexico.
I absolutely can deny that fertilizer runoff is an issue in the great plains of North America. If you have evidence to the contrary then please share it. Otherwise don't post nonsense that can be used to vilify our industry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,465 Posts
Seldom is there talk about what the raw sewage that's dumped daily from urban centers is doing to contribute to the algae problems (example, Winnipeg). Local lake was drained several years ago for a clean up, you should have seen all the sewer pipes laying out in the lake. All kinds of research done on fertilizer applied by farms, but none for cosmetic purposes.
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
Top