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Last year I was fighting rotor loss in my 1480.

In order to fix the problem this year, I was hoping to get an education as to what rotor loss actually is.

Is it grain that is lost because it isn't fully thrashed out by the time the plants hit the end of the rotor?

If so, how does one limit rotor loss? Tighten the concaves until it stops?

If I am way off base, what exactly is rotor loss?
 

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Well if you are getting un-threshed grain then you either need to speed the rotor up to get better impact and centrifugal force, maybe concave choice too. Rotors are the best and most efficient way to separate grain but you need to get it threshed. Running more material actually helps this too because you get grain-on-grain threshing. My 9230's have basically the same rotor as you do(slightly more concave wrap) with well over 500HP and I have never seen rotor loss be an issue in wheat or canola.:)
 

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I was asking myself the same question today. So if the rotor loss meter is too high I should simply speed up the rotor or tighten up the concave. Do the veins ever need to be moved
 

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I was asking myself the same question today. So if the rotor loss meter is too high I should simply speed up the rotor or tighten up the concave. Do the veins ever need to be moved
I have never messed with vanes, I think mine are in middle position. If they were set at maximum angle it might be a contributing factor???
 

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I could be all wet....I don't run case anymore, but I was pretty sure the new case combines have larger, and shorter rotors than the previous models....could be wrong though......
 

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Bussard just put this thread up the other day about adjusting vanes for rotor loss.

Rotor loss is any grin or seed of value that makes it out the back of the rotor and onto the ground. Threshed or unthreshed. But remember, the loss sensor on a 1480 and up to whatever number, about all 88s, is still inside the combine, before the chopper. So rotor loss readings from the monitor is not accurate.
 

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I always fight rotor loss never chaffer. I believe vanes do need to be adjusted in older series combines not the new ones. They work on a different threshing concept. Case has gone from a "wedge" threshing concept to a grind it all up to powder and drop it onto the pre-separation and sieves rather than auger bed and sieves. It is a lot more inefficient but it works well. I still don't quite understand the concept of using a combine with a small tube rotor or a bullet rotor (JD) where there is more space between the grates and the rotor. Does this just not add up to more rotor loss and a difficulty in getting the grain separated from the straw? I can understand that you can put a lot "tougher" grain and straw through the machine but aren't you just throwing it out the back rather than separating it and putting it into the bin?
 

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What I found this year and continue to see threw this harvest year conditions, if rotor loss is high and you have tried the normal calibrations to fix the problem with no luck, then try the vane position in the slow position, it could be the answer
 

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At least you have grain to thresh. Some of us don't. Concaves have to be zeroed properly. If not material gets less of a thrash. We also use cover plates to hold the material in longer so there is grain on grain thrashing. I found I did a better job by opening up concaves and travelling faster, once we had a 36 ft draper header. Concaves with more bar over the wires help too.
 
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